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Promising Emerging Energy Sources l Chevron LinkedIn Group Discussion
 

Promising Emerging Energy Sources l Chevron LinkedIn Group Discussion

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Find out what Chevron's LinkedIn Group members think is the most promising emerging energy source and why. ...

Find out what Chevron's LinkedIn Group members think is the most promising emerging energy source and why.

The report aims to provide an overall snapshot of group opinion expressed in the discussion as
well as insight into the group’s dynamics through commenter demographic analysis.

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    Promising Emerging Energy Sources l Chevron LinkedIn Group Discussion Promising Emerging Energy Sources l Chevron LinkedIn Group Discussion Presentation Transcript

    • Promising Emerging Energy SourcesA LinkedIn Group Discussion AnalysisJuly 2012
    • Overview and Methodology DISCUSSION: In your opinion, what is the most promising emerging energy source and why? Is it renewables such as wind, solar, hydro, or geothermal? Clean power such as clean coal, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) or hydrogen power? Unconventional sources such as oil sands or shale gas? Other? Tell us what you think. Ongoing discussion can be found at: http://linkd.in/Nck4aG© 2012 Chevron 2
    • Overview and MethodologyThis is one of the most popular discussions on the Chevron LinkedIn Group Page.To create this report, all of the responses were read and categorized and publicallyavailable information from commenter LinkedIn profiles was compiled. The reportaims to provide an overall snapshot of group opinion expressed in the discussion aswell as insight into the group’s dynamics through commenter demographic analysis. 782 165 198 total comments comments articulated a position unique commenters Comments were received between February 2011 and January 2012.© 2012 Chevron 3
    • Overview and MethodologyFor clarification, please note, two of the most popular positions expressedin the discussion have been categorized as follows: Combination Energy Efficiency Refers to comments that clearly expressed Refers to comments in favor of technologies the belief that no single source is most and ingenuities that achieve energy promising and multiple emerging sources reduction and find these savings to be the will need to be cultivated for the future. most promising emerging energy source. “ The energy companies are think tanks of engineers and managers with real programs developing “ I think the most promising “source” of energy is aggregated efficiency & conservation. We live in a world of declining biofuels, geothermal, hydrogen, resources and increasing population - we Greg Michael Jamie Hannon MBA solar, wind - the entire spectrum absolutely need to learn how to use our “ * “ * of possibilities. existing reserves more wisely.© 2012 Chevron *All Linked comments featured in the report have been condensed from original. 4
    • Response Breakdown“What is the most promising emerging energy source and why?” 30% Combination 4% Hydrogen 20% Natural Gas 4% Nuclear 17% Energy Efficiency 4% BioMass 10% Solar 2% Algae 7% Wind 2% Water 5% Geothermal 1% Electromagnetic© 2012 Chevron 5
    • Response Analysis T. Boone Pickens was referenced during the discussion thread in March, June, and July of 2011. In an interview with Roll Call, published May 17, 2011, Pickens discussed a shift in his plan, originally established in 2008. Largely due to wind power investments not proving financially viable in the short term, Pickens “tabled” the renewable energy section of his plan in favor of clean energy, specifically the development of natural gas. In July of 2011, Pickens continued to buy up U.S. shale acreage and on April 28, 2012 wrote a letter to the editor of USA Today, taking exception to an editorial that urged the export of natural gas.© 2012 Chevron 6
    • Response Analysis The overall top Chevron Group discussion responses (note that participants were largely from the United States) match closely with the current pillars of the “Pickens Plan.” Comments specifically mentioning Pickens discussed his motives for moving away from wind power and the viability of natural gas. Pickens Pillars* Chevron Group Responses Invest in multiple alternative energy technologies. 30% Combination Use America’s abundant natural gas to replace imported oil as 20% a transportation fuel. Natural Gas 12% Provide incentives to homeowners and the owners of commercial buildings to upgrade their insulation and increase efficiency. Energy Efficiency Develop renewable energy sources, 10% Solar such as wind and solar power. 7% Wind© 2012 Chevron *See Appendix A 7
    • Response Analysis Nuclear Energy was a popular topic in the discussion, though it did not receive enough endorsement to make the top 5. Safety was the primary concern – if not a worry of the commenter, it was voiced that a collective negative sentiment, much of which stems from the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis that began on March 11, 2011 in Japan, would be too strong to overcome. Nuclear Energy Comments (2011) 16 14 12 Number of Commenters 10 8 6 4 2 0 n r* r g pt c Ja Ap Au Se No De ay v n ct b l a Ju Ju Fe M M O Safety Concerns No Safety Concerns Direct Mentions of Fukushima *All comments in March were made after the 11th© 2012 Chevron 8
    • Individual Commenter DemographicsEducation Gender 10% 90% 36% 32% Male Female 32% Approximate Commenter Age Bachelors Degree 65-75 8 Masters Degree or Higher 55-65 35 Other or Not Reported 45-55 45 Age 35-45 40 25-35 26 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Number of Commenters© 2012 Chevron 9
    • Group Commenter DemographicsTop Commenting States Commenter Frequency IL MO 5 5 163 people 1 to 3 times commented PA 5 MA 6 WA 6 8 people 4 to 6 times LA 8 commented FL 10 8 NY 11 CA 21 people commented 7 to 9 times TX 43 0 10 20 30 40 50 18 Number of Commenters people commented 10 or more times© 2012 Chevron 10
    • Group Commenter Demographics Top Industries Top Countries 103 Oil and Energy 159 USA 9 Renewables & Environment 7 Nigeria 8 Information Technology and Services 6 UK 5 Financial Services 5 India 4 Environmental Services 2 Netherlands 4 Telecommunications 2 Malaysia 4 Industrial Automation 2 Indonesia 4 Airlines/Aviation 2 Canada© 2012 Chevron 11
    • External Perspectives on Emerging Energies The following opinion polls serve to compare how the Chevron LinkedIn Group’s responses about emerging energy sources map to broader nationwide perspectives on this topic. This is for illustration purposes only and does not reflect Chevron’s opinion on this topic in any way.© 2012 Chevron 12
    • External Perspectives on Emerging Energies In March 2011, a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation Poll* asked adults across the United States: “In thinking about [America’s] future energy needs, which of these energy sources do you think we should rely on more and which should we rely on less?” Results: More Less 11% 17% 29% 57% 88% 83% 70% 42% Solar Wind Natural Nuclear Power Power Gas Power© 2012 Chevron *See Appendix B 13
    • External Perspectives on Emerging EnergiesAccording to a Pew Research Center survey* taken of adults across the United States, a 10% shift was seenin favor of fossil fuels between 2011 and 2012. The Poll asked: “Right now, which ONE of the following do you think should be the more important priority for addressing America’s energy supply?” Results: Wind, Solar, Hydrogen Oil, Coal, Natural Gas 29% 39% 63% 52% February- March March 2011 2012© 2012 Chevron * See Appendix C 14
    • External Perspectives on Emerging EnergiesA Gallup Poll* surveyed adults across the United States in March 2011 and 2012, the year of and yearafter the tsunami in Japan, asking: “Generally speaking, do you think nuclear power plants are safe or not safe?” Results: Safe Not Safe Unsure 6% 4% 36% 58% 40% 57% March March 2011 2012© 2012 Chevron * See Appendix D 15
    • Appendix© 2012 Chevron 16
    • Appendix Ahttp://www.pickensplan.com/theplanAs of June 18, 2012There are several pillars to the Pickens Plan:• Use America’s abundant natural gas to replace imported oil as a transportation fuel;• Build a 21st century backbone electrical transmission grid;• Develop renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power; and,• Provide incentives to homeowners and the owners of commercial buildings to upgrade their insulation and increase efficiency.By investing in alternative energies while utilizing natural gas for transportation and energygeneration, America can decrease its dependence on OPEC oil, develop the cutting-edge know-howto make wind and solar technology viable, and keep money at home to pay for the whole thing.Reuters The Daily PickensBoone Pickens says still buying shale acreage Pickens’ letter published in USA TodayMatt Daily, July 12, 2011 The Pickens Team, June 28, 2012 USA Today Letters: Seize advantage of cheap natural gas T. Boone Pickens, June 27, 2012© 2012 Chevron 17
    • Appendix Bhttp://www.pollingreport.com/energy.htmCNN/Opinion Research Corporation Poll. March 18-20, 2011. N=1,012 adults nationwide. Margin of error + 3.“In thinking about this country’s future energy needs, which of these energy sources do you think weshould rely on more and which should we rely on less? . . .” More Less Unsure % % %“Solar power”3/18-20/11 88 11 -“Wind power”3/18-20/11 83 17 1“Natural gas”3/18-20/11 70 29 1“Coal” 43 56 13/18-20/11“Nuclear power” 42 57 13/18-20/11“Oil” 28 71 13/18-20/11The Washington PostRenewable energy sees record $257 billion investment in2011, solar drives much spendingAP, Published June 11© 2012 Chevron 18
    • Appendix Chttp://www.pollingreport.com/energy.htmPew Research Center survey. March 7-11, 2012. N=1,503 adults nationwide. Margin of error + 3.“Right now, which ONE of the following do you think should be the more important priority for addressingAmerica’s energy supply? Developing alternative sources, such as wind, solar and hydrogen technology.Expanding exploration and production of oil, coal and natural gas.” Wind, solar, Oil, coal, Give equal Unsure hydrogen natural gas priority (vol.) % % % % 43/7 - 11/12 52 39 5 22/22 - 3/1/11 63 29 6© 2012 Chevron 19
    • Appendix Dhttp://www.pollingreport.com/energy.htmGallup Poll. March 25-27, 2011. N=1,027 adults nationwide. Margin of error + 4.“Generally speaking, do you think nuclear power plants in the United States are safe or not safe?” N=527 (Form B), MoE + 5 Safe Not Safe Unsure % % %3/25 - 27/11 58 39 5Gallup Poll. March 8-11, 2012. N=1,024 adults nationwide. Margin of error + 4.“Generally speaking, do you think nuclear power plants are safe or not safe?” N=503 (Form B), margin of error ± 5. Safe Not Safe Unsure % % %3/8 - 11/12 57 40 4Huffington Post WorldJapan Fukushima Disaster: Nuclear Reactor StillHas Fatally High Radiation Levels, Little WaterMari Yamaguchi, March 28, 2012© 2012 Chevron 20