2012 information literacy 1 final
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2012 information literacy 1 final 2012 information literacy 1 final Presentation Transcript

  • Information Literacy 1
  • Information Literacy 1 What is information literacy?
  • Information Literacy 1 What is information literacy? View slide
  • Information Literacy 1 What is information literacy? View slide
  • Information Literacy 1 What is information literacy? Wh at is information literacy?
  • Information Literacy 1
    • Information literacy is the ability to
    • identify what information is needed; [WHAT]
    • understand how the information is organized; [HOW]
    • identify the best sources of information for a given need; [WHERE]
    • locate those sources ; [WHERE]
    • evaluate the sources critically ; [WHY/ HOW] and
    • share that information . [FOR WHOM]
    • It is the knowledge of commonly used research techniques.
    • (From: the University of Idaho) http://www.webs.uidaho.edu/info_literacy/
    • Note: Information literacy is NOT computer skills.
    What is information literacy?
  • Information Literacy 1 Why is information literacy important? Information literacy is important because we are constantly bombarded by different kinds of information, both visually and aurally > information overload .
  • Not all information is created equal. Some might be authoritative, current, reliable. But some might be biased, out of date, misleading, and false. To sieve out information that we need is therefore an essential life skill, i.e. information literacy. Information Literacy 1 Why is information literacy important?
  • Information Literacy 1
    • Information is usually organised and categorised according to
    • Genre classifications (e.g. non-fiction vs. fiction)
    • Genres/ Text types (e.g. thriller vs. romance; newspaper feature article vs. factual recount of a catastrophe)
    • Subject classifications (e.g. history vs. geography; biology vs. physics)
    • Format or Media Type (e.g. CD, DVD, Print or Broadcast)
    • But it can also be categorised by the ORDER IN WHICH it is produced (i.e. who produces it and who the major audience is), e.g. Popular vs Scholarly information.
    • (From: the University of Idaho) http://www.webs.uidaho.edu/info_literacy/
    How is information organised?
  • Information Literacy 1
    • Popular sources = publications that inform and entertain the general public .
    How is information organised: Popular vs Scholarly Sources
  • Information Literacy 1
    • Scholarly sources = publications that disseminate research findings and invite academic discussion among professionals within disciplines .
    How is information organised: Popular vs Scholarly Sources
  • Information Literacy 1
    • A primary source refers to an original object or document. It is the raw-material that is often considered first-hand information. It can be found in:
    • eyewitness accounts
    • results of an experiment
    • statistical data
    • legal documents
    • interviews
    • From: Ithaca College Library http://www.ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/primary
    Primary vs Secondary Sources
  • Information Literacy 1
    • A secondary source usually refers to something written about a primary source. It can include:
    • comments on the original material
    • interpretations on the original material
    • summary/ synopsis/ abstract of the original material
    • discussions about the original material
    • Note: If I tell you something, I am the primary source. If you tell someone else what I told you, you are the secondary source.
    • From: Ithaca College Library http://www.ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/primary
    Primary vs Secondary Sources
  • Information Literacy 1 Primary vs Secondary Source?
  • Information Literacy 1 Primary vs Secondary Source?
  • Information Literacy 1 Question Why is it important to use primary sources? Why is it important to use scholarly sources? Which are your best resources for research?
    • Primary sources
    • Scholarly sources
  • Information Literacy 1
    • For a piece of research to qualify as ‘academic research’, it must be:
    • Credible
    • Useful
    • Reliable
    • Relevant
    Why use these resources for research?
    • Primary sources
    • Scholarly sources
  • Information Literacy 1 Where do we look for the best resources?
    • PRINT
    • Hullett Memorial Library
    • National Library
    • Newspapers
    • ELECTRONIC
    • NLB E-Resources (www.nlb.gov.sg)
    • SIRS Researcher (via RE Portal)
    • Newslink (via RE Portal)
    • Youtube
  • Information Literacy 1 Where do we look for the best resources?
    • ELECTRONIC
    • NLB E-Resources (www.nlb.gov.sg)
    • SIRS Researcher (via RI Discovery)
    • Newslink (via RI Discovery)
  • https//discovery.ri.edu.sg
  •  
  •  
  • Information Literacy 1 SIRS Issues Researcher
    • SIRS has been the leader in social issues coverage for more than 35 years. 

    • Controversial Issues such as abortion, capital punishment, immigration, and gun control; and current issues such as the global financial crisis, mass media, privacy rights for teenagers, alternative education, climate change, and same-sex marriage. 

Thousands of highly targeted documents, primary source documents, websites, and multimedia (including 13,000+ research-quality images) represent viewpoints from the pros and cons, to everything in-between. 

 Every SIRS Leading Issue:
    • Offers introductory overview for context including Terms to Know, Perspectives, and links for Further Research.
    • Reviews the issue's pro/con viewpoints with Essential Questions, answers, and resources for each viewpoint.
    • Provides relevant, full-text documents and multimedia resources, updated daily.
    • Offers sample activity templates for student essays, research papers, debates, and a Research Guide for the Critical Thinker.
    • Links to new collaborative aids, like social bookmarking and note organizers, to discuss and share ideas, then create, present, and mash-up your ideas in Web 2.0-style.
    • Promotes critical thinking and inquiry-based learning.
  •  
  • Information Literacy 1 Newslink Access to news articles from the Singapore Press Holdings. English newspapers since 1989, and Chinese newspapers since 1994.
  •  
  • Information Literacy 1 NewsBank Access to news articles from all over the world.
  •  
  • Information Literacy 1 National Library Board E-Resources Access to databases which are gateways to academic journals. Commonly used databases are ProQuest, and JSTOR.
  •  
  • http://www.nlb.gov.sg
  • Registration
  • Registration
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television”
    • Go to Wikipedia www.wikipedia.org and put “television” in the search box.
    • Scan the information on the page. Is this secondary or primary source? Is this information meant for the general public ( popular ), or for professionals in academic or research settings ( scholarly )?
    • Scroll down to look at the Menu . Are there sub-headers that might interest you? Make a mental note. For example, click on 4. Social aspects and effects on children.
    • Click on the hyperlink ‘ Media violence research ’.
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 5. Read the first paragraph: Research into the media and violence examines whether a link between consuming media violence and subsequent aggressive and violent behavior exists. Although some social scientists support this link, [1] methodological and theoretical problems with the existing literature limit interpretation of findings in this area. There is concern among some scholars that media researchers may have exaggerated effects (Ferguson & Kilburn, 2009; Freedman, 2002; Pinker 2002; Savage, 2004). Let’s analyse this short paragraph.
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 5. Read the first paragraph: Research into the media and violence examines whether a link between consuming media violence and subsequent aggressive and violent behavior exists. Although some social scientists support this link, [1] methodological and theoretical problems with the existing literature limit interpretation of findings in this area. There is concern among some scholars that media researchers may have exaggerated effects (Ferguson & Kilburn, 2009; Freedman, 2002; Pinker 2002; Savage, 2004).
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 5. Read the first paragraph: Research into the media and violence examines whether a link between consuming media violence and subsequent aggressive and violent behavior exists. Although some social scientists support this link, [1] methodological and theoretical problems with the existing literature limit interpretation of findings in this area. There is concern among some scholars that media researchers may have exaggerated effects (Ferguson & Kilburn, 2009; Freedman, 2002; Pinker 2002; Savage, 2004). Secondary source?
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 5. Read the first paragraph: Research into the media and violence examines whether a link between consuming media violence and subsequent aggressive and violent behavior exists. Although some social scientists support this link, [1] methodological and theoretical problems with the existing literature limit interpretation of findings in this area. There is concern among some scholars that media researchers may have exaggerated effects (Ferguson & Kilburn, 2009; Freedman, 2002; Pinker 2002; Savage, 2004). Primary sources?
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 5. Read the first paragraph: Research into the media and violence examines whether a link between consuming media violence and subsequent aggressive and violent behavior exists. Although some social scientists support this link, [1] methodological and theoretical problems with the existing literature limit interpretation of findings in this area. There is concern among some scholars that media researchers may have exaggerated effects (Ferguson & Kilburn, 2009; Freedman, 2002; Pinker 2002; Savage, 2004). Primary sources? Probably yes. But which are the more scholarly ones?
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 6. Scroll down to the References section, and compare these 2 works. Ferguson, C., & Kilburn, J. (2009). The public health risks of media violence: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Pediatrics. vs. Pinker, Steven (2002). The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature . New York, NY: Penguin. Look at where it is published. What does the title tell you?
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 6. Scroll down to the References section, and compare these 2 works. Ferguson, C., & Kilburn, J. (2009). The public health risks of media violence: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Pediatrics. vs. Pinker, Steven (2002). The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature . New York, NY: Penguin. Which is more scholarly?
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 6. Scroll down to the References section, and compare these 2 works. Ferguson, C., & Kilburn, J. (2009). The public health risks of media violence: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Pediatrics. vs. Pinker, Steven (2002). The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature . New York, NY: Penguin. Which is more scholarly? The Journal of Pediatrics!
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 7. Now, look for keywords in the titles in the References section, and search for other scholarly articles in JSTOR. 8. Go to NLB E-Resources > e-journals > JSTOR > Advanced Search
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television”
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 9. Type any keywords relevant to your research. For example: television effects on children 10. Click on PDF to download the research article.
  • Information Literacy 1 (Hands-On) Topic: “Television” 10. Read the article. Is it useful? 11. Look for more articles with different keyword searches. 12. Take time to surf for useful articles now. (Approximately 10 minutes)
  • Information Literacy 1 Having read a few articles now, what set of criteria do we need to evaluate these sources? (Watch this video)
  • Information Literacy 1 What set of criteria do we need to evaluate sources?
    • CARRDSS, a mnemonic device, can be a useful tool:
    • Credibility
    • Accuracy
    • Reliability
    • Relevance
    • Date
    • Source
    • Scope and Purpose
    To be covered in Information Literacy 2 lecture.
  • Information Literacy 1 What did we learn today?