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1. hml history s share

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    1. hml history s share 1. hml history s share Presentation Transcript

    • Hullett Memorial Library Hullett Memorial Library Raffles InstitutionRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial LibraryMission“…to guide all Rafflesians to be effective and responsible users of informationand creators of new knowledge.” Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial LibraryWelcome to HML Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library OVERVIEW History History of the Hullett Memorial Library, the oldest library in Singapore. Resources, Facilities & Services Rules & RegulationsRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY HML named after R.W. Hullett (1870-1906) Renamed as HML in 1923 during the centenary celebration of the founding of Raffles Institution in 1823. The idea of Dr Lim Boon Keng and Sir Song Ong Siang.Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY FOUNDERS Sir Song Ong Siang Dr Lim Boon KengRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORYBras Basah SchoolHML was only a small room adjoining the principal office.Collection : 1400The library was renovated and upgraded after WWII. Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORYOfficially reopened again on the 4th May 1950 with acollection of about 4000 books. Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY Simple and spartan reading room of yesteryears.Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY Pupil librarians’ work roomTeenage Periodical Corner Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY At Grange Road CampusThe move to Grange Road took place on the 3rd August 1975 Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY The Library occupied the top floor of the Science LabRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY The library loan counter at Grange RoadRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY The move to Bishan in 1990Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORYRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORYRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY http://exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg/bookstob ytes/zone2/index.htmlRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY http://exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg/bookstob ytes/zone2/index.htmlRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY http://exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg/bookstob ytes/zone2/index.htmlRaffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library HISTORY Raffles Chair (English-Regency work of 1810 to 1820) There is one item of furniture that sums up the impact of the neoclassical more than any other: the Raffles Chair. Its name is generally explained by the idea that its use was popularized during Raffles brief rule as Lieutenant- Governor over Java, to 1816. So prevalent is the Raffles chair, in surviving images and photographs of the second half of the 19th century, (and in todays homes) that The basic design of the Raffles chair is usually credited to the brilliant English designer Thomas Sheraton who published his most influential designs between 1794 and 1803. A chair which has a similar profile to the Raffles chair does appear on plate 33 of Sheratons Drawing Book of 1794. The basic shapes is of thin arms arching down, forming a scroll that sits above a vase-shaped dowel. The line continues down to the straight, tapering reeded front legs. http://exhibitions.nlb.gov.sg/bookstobwrote The shapes are heavily ornamented, but Sheraton ytes/zone2/index.htmlhtem will serve as patterns "the mere outlines of any of either for painted or mahogany chairs, by leaving out the ornaments for the mahogany."The Raffles chairs typically have a strong horizontal back rail, with horizontally oriented cross bars usually quite high above the backof the sear. Most importantly, the broad rail usually projects beyond the sides of the seat, and takes a concave form to welcome the sittersback. Importantly too, the rear legs are swept sharply backwards.It is clear that the Raffles chair is a later development; its curving, extended back and swept-back legs reflecting the explicit influence ofdesigns revived from ancient Greece.Outside of Java, the models most similar are American designs of 1815 and the heavier English-Regency work of 1810 to 1820. Raffles Institution
    • Hullett Memorial Library THE ENDRaffles Institution