How to identify fibre and fabric

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Power Point presentation about fibre and fabric identification.

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Natural fabrics
Sythetic fabrics
Fibre blends
Fibre mixtures

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  • Hi, my name is Cheryl Widlend, and today I will be talking about HOW TO IDENTIFY FIBRES AND FABRICS. This presentation is about 10 minutes long. www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • NATURAL FABRICS –The natural fibres used to manufacture natural fabrics is derived from plants or animals. e.g cotton and wool SYNTHETIC OR MAN MADE FIBRES – These fabrics were developed after extensive research by scientists to improve upon the properties of natural fabrics FIBRE BLENDS - A Blend is a fabric or yarn made up of more than one type of fibre in a fabric. FABRIC MIXES – This a a fabric made of different kinds of thread or yarn. e.g. the warp yarn is viscose and weft yarn is an acetate, used to create a shot effect in a fabric www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • COTTON - is a soft, fluffy staple fibre that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant. Cotton is one of the most common types of fabric used in clothing manufacture SILK – is a fine lustrous fibre composed out of fibroin and produced by certain insect larvae to form cocoons, especially the strong, elastic, fibrous secretion of silkworms are used to make thread and fabric. WOOL – is a dense, soft, often curly hair forming the coat of sheep and certain other mammals, such as the goat and alpaca. Wool consists of cylindrical fibers of keratin www.FashionMentorOnline.com FLAX/LINEN - Is the thread/fabric made from fibres of the flax plant.
  • SYNTHETIC FIBRE VISCOSE RAYON – It ’s the first man made natural filament yarn and staple fibre. It is very versatile, and used in garment production, domestic textiles, motorcar applications. CELLULOSE ACETATE - It ’s a man made fibre of natural origin ACRYLIC – It ’s a synthetic fibre made from a polymer www.FashionMentorOnline.com POLYESTER - was one of the first man-made fibres , and has been manufactured on an industrial scale since 1947
  • SYNTHETIC FIBRE NYLON – It ’s a man-made fiber manufactured from a synthetic polyamide. These fibers are generally very strong and flexible METALIC FIBRES – are synthetic fibres which include metal and may be plastic-coated ... Gold and silver have been used since ancient times as yarns for fabric decoration ELASTROMERIC – Is a natural or synthetic rubber www.FashionMentorOnline.com COMMON NAME ASSOCIATION – is subject to trademarks and patents . e.g. DuPont Lycra is a common elastromeric
  • FIBRE BLENDS- I ’ts a Yarn/fibre made from two or more different fibres COTTON/POYLESTER is a common fibre blend BLENDED FIBRES are found in EACH of the yarns in the fabric www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • So, WHY do we BLEND FIBRES? Because the fibre blend is a fabric or yarn made up of more than one type of fiber, it minimizes the disadvantages of the individual blends, in terms of its chemical physical and economic impact. This is discussed in further detail further on in the presentation www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • ADVANTAGES OF FIBRE BLENDS There are many benefits to blending fabrics, many different textures can be created for various different uses. Some of the benefits of blended fabrics are the qualities of each individual fiber combined with the qualities of other fibers. For example cotton blended with polyester will give you the comfort of cotton, along with the wrinkle-resistance, durability and strength of polyester. The more natural fibers the fabric contains, the more comfortable the fabric will be to wear, since natural fabrics is more breathable and does not contain any chemicals. www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • DURABILITY Adding synthetic fibres such as: Acrylic, Nylon and Polyester to natural fibres Increases the durability of the natural fibres Some of the most common blended fabrics are:……….Polyester/Cotton……..Nylon/Wool……..Nylon/Acetate…….Ramie/Polyester……….Ramie/Acrylic………Wool/Cotton………Linen/Cotton……….Linen/Silk………..Linen/Rayon……….Silk/Wool…………..Rayon/Cotton www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • STRENGTH Strengthening of fibres…….. e.g. adding nylon to a natural fibre increases the strength of the natural fibre www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • MOISTURE ABOSRBENCY AND COMFORT Blending an absorbent fibre (e.g. wool) with a non absorbent fibre (e.g. polyester) makes the blend more absorbent than pure polyester www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • WRINKLE RESISTANCE Synthetic fibres, such as Polyester or nylon fibres are usually used to reduce the wrinkling properties of another fibre, e.g. a natural fibre such as cotton www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • HEAT RESISITANCE As synthetic fabrics are easily adversely affected by heat, adding natural fibres improves the heat resistance of the blended fabric www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • CHEMICAL PROPERTIES Natural fibres are generally more adversely affected by chemicals e.g dry cleaning chemicals. Adding the synthetic fibres reduces the amount by which the dry cleaning fluids or other chemicals affect the blended fabric. Please note that Laundering still needs to done as per the weakest (natural) fibre care instruction requirements www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • FIBRE MIXTURES Not as common as fibre blends. Two or more yarns woven or knitted as SEPARATE yarns into the fabric Example – shot viscose/acetate – warp is viscose and weft is acetate to create the shot effect. Other interesting effect is the use of an Angelina fibre which has a super soft handle, much like cashmere, but has been produced in such a way that even just a little added to a fibre mix will result in a sparkling effect. www.FashionMentorOnline.com 
 The fibre can be spun, woven, layered, trapped, bonded etc. Its applications in textile art, embroidery, felt making, papermaking, card and candle-making etc, are endless
  • FIBRE MIXTURE Spandex or lycra is commonly mixed with other fibres to: ……… Increase the wrinkle resistance………Add comfort www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • PURPOSE OF COMMON BLENDS Polyester/cotton – T SHIRT……..Cotton/spandex – DENIM JEANS……….Rayon/spandex – SEMI-Tailored JACKET…………Rayon/wool – Jumper www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • PURPOSE OF COMMON BLENDS Cotton/acetate –SHIRT………Rayon/nylon – KNITTED GARMENT…………Rayon/cotton – CHILD ’S KNITTED GARMENT…….Ramie/cotton – BLOUSE www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • NATURAL FABRICS –The natural fibres used to manufacture natural fabrics is derived from plants or animals. e.g cotton and wool SYNTHETIC OR MAN MADE FIBRES – These fabrics were developed after extensive research by scientists to improve upon the properties of natural fabrics FIBRE BLENDS - A Blend is a fabric or yarn made up of more than one type of fiber in a fabric. FABRIC MIXES – This a a fabric made of different kinds of thread or yarn. e.g warp is viscose and weft is acetate to create a shot effect in a fabric www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • Hi, my name is Cheryl Widlend, and today I will be talking about HOW TO IDENTIFY FIBRES AND FABRICS. This presentation is about 10 minutes long. www.FashionMentorOnline.com
  • You’ve just seen the first session of my ‘How to identify fibres and fabrics’ , if you would like more information about this unit, just email me at [email_address]   And if you have any questions, just email me and I'll be happy to answer them for you. www.FashionMentorOnline.com   Warmly Cheryl
  • How to identify fibre and fabric

    1. 1. How to Identify fibres and fabrics www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    2. 2. <ul><li>Natural fabrics </li></ul><ul><li>Synthetic fabrics </li></ul><ul><li>Fibre blends </li></ul><ul><li>Fabric mixtures </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    3. 3. <ul><li>Cotton </li></ul><ul><li>Silk </li></ul><ul><li>Wool </li></ul><ul><li>Flax (linen) </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    4. 4. <ul><li>Viscose rayon </li></ul><ul><li>Cellulose acetate </li></ul><ul><li>Acrylic </li></ul><ul><li>Polyester </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    5. 5. <ul><li>Nylon </li></ul><ul><li>Metallic </li></ul><ul><li>Elastomeric </li></ul><ul><li>Common name association-subject to trademarks and patents </li></ul><ul><li>(e.g. DuPont Lycra is a common elastomeric) </li></ul>Synthetic fibre www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    6. 6. <ul><li>Two or more different fibres </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton/polyester </li></ul><ul><li>In EACH of the yarns in the fabric </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    7. 7. <ul><li>Minimize the disadvantages of the individual blends: </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical </li></ul><ul><li>Physical </li></ul><ul><li>Economic </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    8. 8. <ul><li>Durability </li></ul><ul><li>Strength </li></ul><ul><li>Moisture absorbency and comfort </li></ul><ul><li>Wrinkle and heat resistance </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical properties </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    9. 9. <ul><li>Adding synthetic fibres such as: </li></ul><ul><li>Acrylic </li></ul><ul><li>Nylon </li></ul><ul><li>Polyester </li></ul><ul><li>Increases the durability of the natural fibres </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    10. 10. <ul><li>Stronger fibres </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    11. 11. <ul><li>Blending an absorbent fibre with a non absorbent fibre makes the blend more absorbent </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    12. 12. <ul><li>Synthetic fibres are usually used </li></ul><ul><li>to reduce the wrinkling properties of the </li></ul><ul><li>natural fibres </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    13. 13. <ul><li>Synthetic fabrics adversely affected by heat </li></ul><ul><li>Natural fibres improves the heat resistance </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    14. 14. <ul><li>Natural fibres are generally more affected by chemicals </li></ul><ul><li>Synthetic fibres reduces the amount by which the chemicals affect the fabric </li></ul><ul><li>Laundering still needs to done to the weakest (natural) fibre </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    15. 15. <ul><li>Not as common as fibre blends </li></ul><ul><li>Two or more yarns woven or knitted as SEPARATE yarns into the fabric </li></ul><ul><li>Example – shot viscose/acetate – warp is viscose and weft is acetate to create the shot effect </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    16. 16. <ul><li>Spandex or lycra is commonly mixed with other fibres to: </li></ul><ul><li>Increase the wrinkle resistance </li></ul><ul><li>Add comfort </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    17. 17. <ul><li>Polyester/cotton – T SHIRT </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton/spandex – DENIM JEANS </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon/spandex – SEMI TAILORED JACKET </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon/wool - JUMPER </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    18. 18. <ul><li>Cotton/acetate – SHIRT </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon/nylon – KNITTED GARMENT </li></ul><ul><li>Rayon/cotton – CHILD ’S KNITTED </li></ul><ul><li>GARMENT </li></ul><ul><li>Ramie/cotton - BLOUSE </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    19. 19. <ul><li>Natural fibre </li></ul><ul><li>Synthetic fibre </li></ul><ul><li>Fibre blends </li></ul><ul><li>Fabric mixtures </li></ul>www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    20. 20. How to Identify fibres and fabrics www.FashionMentorOnline.com
    21. 21. <ul><li>You’ve just seen the first session of my </li></ul><ul><li>‘ How to identify fibres and fabrics’ , if you would like more information about this unit, just email me at [email_address] com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>And if you have any questions, just email me and I'll be happy to answer them for you. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Warmly </li></ul><ul><li>Cheryl </li></ul>

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