Carmenere 2011
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  • merlot – right Carmenere - left
  • Primary Red Varieties (in hectares) Cabernet Sauvignon : 38,806 Merlot : 9,656 Carmenere : 8,249 Syrah : 5,391 Pinot Noir : 2,598 Cabernet Franc: 1,226 Malbec / Cot: 1,148 Primary White Varieties: (in hectares) Sauvignon Blanc: 11,244 Chardonnay : 12,739 Moscatel of Alexandria: 6,035 Riesling: 333 Viognier: 685 Gewürztraminer: 287
  • Hectares Planted Cabernet Sauvignon | 720 Merlot | 190 Carménère | 124 Syrah | 112 Chardonnay | 134
  • At 22,828 feet (6,956 meters), Mt. Aconcagua , the highest mountain in the Americas Total Hectares planted : 1098 Cabernet Sauvignon | 475 Merlot | 157 Carménère | 67 Syrah | 94 Chardonnay | 39  
  • D.O.: Central Valley Valley: MAIPO Vineyards stretch eastward from Santiago to the Andes and westward to the coast three distinct sectors of the Maipo Valley best known for its well-balanced red wines Alto Maipo - Cabernets. Central Maipo is one of the country’s oldest and most diverse productive regions, Coastal Maipo —a relative newcomer—benefits from the cool maritime influence Alto Maipo Rising into the Andean foothills, the Alto Maipo section ranges from roughly 1,300 to 2,600 feet (400 to 800 meters) above sea level and is highly influenced by the mountains themselves. The rising sun must scale the Argentine side of the peaks before first morning light reaches the vines on its western—Chilean—slopes. The afternoon sun warms the vineyards and the cool mountains breezes that slide down the hillsides at night create a broad oscillation between daytime and night-time temperatures, all of which makes for dream-team of conditions for bold yet elegant red wines, especially the regional star Cabernet Sauvignon . Central Maipo The rocky alluvial soils that border the course of the Maipo River along its way from the Andes to the coast, red varietals grow well and strong in this warm-but-not-hot region that spreads out due south of Santiago. It sees less rainfall than its higher altitude neighbor to the west. Pacific Maipo The relatively few vineyards found in the vicinity of the Maipo River as it approaches the Coastal Range, southwest of Santiago, tend to be tucked up against some of the smaller, low-lying hills that rise between the Andes and the Coastal Range. This protects them from a more direct maritime influence. This area is separated from the San Antonio Region to the west by the political (rather than geographical) border that divides the Metropolitan Region from the country’s V Region of Valparaíso.
  • D.O.: Central Valley Valley: MAIPO Vineyards stretch eastward from Santiago to the Andes and westward to the coast three distinct sectors of the Maipo Valley best known for its well-balanced red wines Alto Maipo - Cabernets. Central Maipo is one of the country’s oldest and most diverse productive regions, Coastal Maipo —a relative newcomer—benefits from the cool maritime influence Alto Maipo Rising into the Andean foothills, the Alto Maipo section ranges from roughly 1,300 to 2,600 feet (400 to 800 meters) above sea level and is highly influenced by the mountains themselves. The rising sun must scale the Argentine side of the peaks before first morning light reaches the vines on its western—Chilean—slopes. The afternoon sun warms the vineyards and the cool mountains breezes that slide down the hillsides at night create a broad oscillation between daytime and night-time temperatures, all of which makes for dream-team of conditions for bold yet elegant red wines, especially the regional star Cabernet Sauvignon . Central Maipo The rocky alluvial soils that border the course of the Maipo River along its way from the Andes to the coast, red varietals grow well and strong in this warm-but-not-hot region that spreads out due south of Santiago. It sees less rainfall than its higher altitude neighbor to the west. Pacific Maipo The relatively few vineyards found in the vicinity of the Maipo River as it approaches the Coastal Range, southwest of Santiago, tend to be tucked up against some of the smaller, low-lying hills that rise between the Andes and the Coastal Range. This protects them from a more direct maritime influence. This area is separated from the San Antonio Region to the west by the political (rather than geographical) border that divides the Metropolitan Region from the country’s V Region of Valparaíso.
  • - Winery located in Cachapoal , the northernmost,
  • D.O.: Central Valley Valley: MAIPO Vineyards stretch eastward from Santiago to the Andes and westward to the coast three distinct sectors of the Maipo Valley best known for its well-balanced red wines Alto Maipo - Cabernets. Central Maipo is one of the country’s oldest and most diverse productive regions, Coastal Maipo —a relative newcomer—benefits from the cool maritime influence Alto Maipo Rising into the Andean foothills, the Alto Maipo section ranges from roughly 1,300 to 2,600 feet (400 to 800 meters) above sea level and is highly influenced by the mountains themselves. The rising sun must scale the Argentine side of the peaks before first morning light reaches the vines on its western—Chilean—slopes. The afternoon sun warms the vineyards and the cool mountains breezes that slide down the hillsides at night create a broad oscillation between daytime and night-time temperatures, all of which makes for dream-team of conditions for bold yet elegant red wines, especially the regional star Cabernet Sauvignon . Central Maipo The rocky alluvial soils that border the course of the Maipo River along its way from the Andes to the coast, red varietals grow well and strong in this warm-but-not-hot region that spreads out due south of Santiago. It sees less rainfall than its higher altitude neighbor to the west. Pacific Maipo The relatively few vineyards found in the vicinity of the Maipo River as it approaches the Coastal Range, southwest of Santiago, tend to be tucked up against some of the smaller, low-lying hills that rise between the Andes and the Coastal Range. This protects them from a more direct maritime influence. This area is separated from the San Antonio Region to the west by the political (rather than geographical) border that divides the Metropolitan Region from the country’s V Region of Valparaíso.

Carmenere 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Carménère In the Spotlight
  • 2. Story of Carm é n è re
    • Brought to Chile in 1800’s from France
    • Used to be part of the Bordeaux Blend
      • Took too long to ripen
      • Was found in Medoc Region
        • Known as Grande Vidure,
  • 3. Which is Merlot????
  • 4. Chile Facts
    • Chilean vineyards were first established in the mid-sixteenth century by Spanish missionaries
    • Ocean and Andes influence Climate
    • Phylloxera hasen’t reached Chile
    • Approx 118,000 hectares vineyards
    • Over 8,000 hectares of carmenere
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. Coquimbo Region
  • 8. Limari Valley
    • Founded 1549 (known for Pisco)
    • Rainfall >4”/yr (Drip Irrigation)
    • 1,700 Hectares Vineyards
  • 9. Casa Tamaya
  • 10.  
  • 11. Aconcagua Region
  • 12. Aconcagua Valley
    • Founded
    • Rainfall
    • 1,100 Hectares Vineyards
  • 13. Vina Err á zuriz
  • 14.  
  • 15. Central Valley
  • 16. Maipo Valley
    • 11,000 hectares vineyards
    • Alto, Central, Pacific
    • RED wine country (Cab is flagship)
  • 17. Vi ñ a Chocalan Winery
  • 18.  
  • 19. Rapel Valley
  • 20. Rapel Valley
    • Comprised of Colchagua and Cachapoal
    • stretches from the Pacific coast to the slopes of the Andes
    • 34,000 Hectares Vineyards
    • Dry and Warm
  • 21. Anakena Winery
  • 22.  
  • 23. Maule
  • 24. Maule Valley
    • Largest and very old region in Chile
    • Practice Dry Farming
    • 34,000 hectares vineyards
  • 25. Casas Patronales
  • 26.  
  • 27. Single Vineyard Carm é n è re
    • Vina Carmen
  • 28. Single Vineyard Carm é n è re
    • Vina Errazuriz
  • 29. The Future for Carm é n è re
    • Chile
      • Aconcagua Valley (Aconcagua)
      • Colchagua Valley (Rapel)
    • USA
      • Lake County (Guenoc Winery)
      • Washington (Walla Walla)