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Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
Intro to electricity cristina hernandez
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Intro to electricity cristina hernandez

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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICITY BY: CRISTINA HERNANDE Z
  • 2. HOW CAN YOU TELL IF ELECTRICITY IS AROUND YOU? Electricity is everywhere! Examples  Throughout your home and school, electrical outlets where you can plug in all sorts of electrical appliances.  A cell phone or tablet device contain batteries, which create fluctuating amounts of electricity.  Static Electricity (An everyday application) The shock you can get from rubbing your shoes on the carpet and then touching something metal like a door knob.  A bolt of lightning.
  • 3. WHAT IS AN ATOM?  The smallest component in all things  Made up of 3 smaller particles o Nucleus o Protons( Positive charged) o Neutrons ( no charge) Electrons (negative charge) Electricity is produced when electrons move between atoms. Positive atoms look for free negative electrons and attract them, so that they can balance.
  • 4. Conductors and Insulators Conductors: are materials through which electrons can move more freely. Examples of good conductors • Copper, Aluminum, Steel, Liquids like saltwater Insulators: are materials that electrons cannot move around. Examples • Glass, rubber, plastic or dry wood are good insulators Important safety Without insulators you would not be able to touch a pan or T.V.
  • 5. ELECTRIC CIRCUIT Electrons cannot jump spontaneously through the air to a positively charged atom. They always need a circuit to move. When a source of energy, like a battery, is connected to a light bulb the electrons can move from the battery to the light bulb and back again. We call this an electric circuit. A current that flows back and forth is called an alternating current (AC).
  • 6. CAN ELECTRIC CURRENTS BE STOPPED? • You can discontinue the current from flowing by putting a switch into the circuit. You can open the circuit and stop electrons from moving. • A section of metal or wire can also be used to create heat. When an electrical current passes through such metal it can be slowed down by the flow of resistance. • This causes friction and makes the wires hot. • That’s why a person can toast their bread in a toaster or dry their with warm air from a hairdryer. • Special switches ,called fuses, protect the wiring in many buildings incase of wires becoming too Hot
  • 7. TYPES OF ELECTRICITY S TAT I C ELECTRICITY • happens when there is a build-up of electrons • it stays in one place and then jumps to another object • it does not need a closed circuit to flow • Lightning is one form of static electricity CURRENT ELECTRICITY • • • • • happens when electrons flow freely between objects it needs a conductor— something in which it can flow an example a wire current electricity needs a closed circuit it is in many appliances in our homes - TV sets , laptops, cell phones, a battery is a form of current electricity
  • 8. HOW BATTERIES WORK A battery has a working chemical unit cell inside, it helps produce electric charges. The flat end of the battery has a negative charge and on the opposite end a positive charge. When you connect a wire onto both ends a current flows. When the current passes through a light bulb electric energy is transformed into light. The chemicals in the battery keep the ends charged. As times passes, the chemical becomes weaker and battery cannot produce any more energy.
  • 9. HOW ELECTRICITY IS CREATED AND MEASURED • Generators are used to transform mechanical energy into electrical energy. • A magnets interchanges inside a coil of wire. • When the magnet moves, an electric current is produced in the wire. • Electricity is measured in watts, named after James Watt who invented the steam engine.
  • 10. HOW ELECTRICITY IS TRANSPORTED • The electricity formed by a generator travels along cables to a transformer that alternates the voltage of electricity. • Power lines carry the high-voltage electricity over very long distances. • When it reaches your home town another transformer lowers the voltage and smaller power lines bring it to homes and other buildings.

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