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Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860
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Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860

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This WebQuest is designed for 8th grade social studies. Students will answer questions about what life was like during the Pre-Civil War era by identifying with a particular character...a Native …

This WebQuest is designed for 8th grade social studies. Students will answer questions about what life was like during the Pre-Civil War era by identifying with a particular character...a Native American, a Plantation Slave, a Pioneer, or a Government Representative.

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  • 1. THE GROWTH OF DEMOCRACY, 1810-1860 Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 8th Grade Social Studies Designed by Cheryl Korbach [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] As the student, you have already learned about the Jefferson Era. This includes Jefferson’s presidency, the Louisiana Purchase, and the exploration of Lewis and Clark. In this unit, you will gain an understanding of the age of Jackson, which comprises slavery, nationalism, and sectionalism, and the Trail of Tears. You will assume the identity of one of the following four characters: Government Representative, Plantation Slave, Homesteader (Pioneer), or Native American. The three latter figures will have the occasion to express your grievances concerning your unjust living conditions before a U.S. Senate subcommittee. Because for you, the phrase “Era of Good Feelings” that symbolized the period between 1815-24 provided you with little to none of the components it promoted, prosperity and social advancement. The big question is “What will the government do for you?” Here is your chance to ask them to right a wrong.
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Picture this: You have been selected by the U.S. Senate subcommittee to speak on behalf of your people/community and acquaint the Senate members with the difficulties in your life and how the government can make your existence more bearable. You will prepare a hand written autobiographical packet using the Internet and primary and secondary sources that will include the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Page </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-2 At least two pages of hand written notes taken when you research the above topics. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Complete bibliography for 3 sources (only one can be from the internet). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A U.S. map showing the location of your home. Example: If you are a Seminole Indian, you will highlight on the U.S. Map where in Florida you are living. You may copy a map from a book or print a map from the internet. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.ramosrisk.com/50states.gif </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Background information on how you came to live there. (You can make up a realistic story telling what led you to your current location.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe a typical day of your life from morning until night. Include a description of your work, diet, and recreation activities. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>List problems that you encounter and what the government could do to improve your life. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include a diary of at least a hand written page that tells your inner thought about your life and your relationships. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government Representatives must document what the government’s policy was during this time for each of these groups. List all the problems with each group, the president’s policies for each group and what legislation was passed during this time. </li></ul></ul>Title
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>To accomplish the task, you must complete a few steps first to learn about the person’s </li></ul><ul><li>identity you have assumed. </li></ul><ul><li>Native American </li></ul><ul><li>Research Day 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Choose your tribe (needs to be on that lived east of the Mississippi before 1850). </li></ul><ul><li>Give yourself an appropriate and meaningful name. </li></ul><ul><li>Take notes on these topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyday life of a member of that tribe </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho using </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kind of work that you do </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diet (how you get your food and what you eat) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recreation activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beliefs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Problems that you encounter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bibliography – on a separate piece of paper – must have 3 sources (including one book). </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2 & 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Use your notes and bibliography (pages 1 & 2) to develop pages 3-7. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 3 – a fictional but realistic story about how you came to live where you live. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 4 – Describe a typical day of your life from morning until night. Include a </li></ul><ul><li>description of your work, meals, and fun activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 5 – List at least 5 problems that you have and what the government could do to </li></ul><ul><li>make your life more bearable. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 6 – Write at least ¾ page diary entry or series of smaller entries that tells your </li></ul><ul><li>inner thoughts about your life and your relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 7 – A U.S. map on which you have marked your home. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.trailoftears.no/ </li></ul>
  • 5. Process Contd. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Homesteader (Pioneer) </li></ul><ul><li>Research Day 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Choose where you live (needs to be a rural setting where pioneers lived. </li></ul><ul><li>Give yourself an appropriate and meaningful name. </li></ul><ul><li>Take notes on these topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a. Everyday life on the homestead </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b. Housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>c. Kind of work that you do – lots of chores!! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>d. Diet (how you get your food and what you eat) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>e. Recreation activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>f. Beliefs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>g. Problems that you encounter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bibliography – on a separate piece of paper – must have 3 sources (including one books). </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2 & 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Use your notes and bibliography (pages 1 & 2) to develop pages 3-7. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 3 – a fictional but realistic story about how you came to live where you live. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 4 – Describe a typical day of your life from morning until night. Include a description of your work, meals, </li></ul><ul><li>and fun activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 5 – List a least 5 problems that you have and what the government could do to make your life more </li></ul><ul><li>bearable. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 6 – Write at least ¾ page diary entry or series of smaller entries that tells your inner thoughts about your </li></ul><ul><li>life and your relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 7 – A U.S. map on which you have marked your home. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.americanwest.com/pages/awexpans.htm </li></ul>
  • 6. Process Contd. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Plantation Slave </li></ul><ul><li>Research Day 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Choose where you live (needs to be where a plantation actually would have been located.) </li></ul><ul><li>Give yourself an appropriate and meaningful name. </li></ul><ul><li>Takes notes on these topics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a. Everyday life on the plantation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b. Housing – where you sleep </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>c. Kind of work that you do – are you a house slave or a field slave? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>d. Diet (how you get your food and what you eat) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>e. Recreation activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>f. Beliefs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>g. Problems that you encounter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bibliography – on a separate piece of paper – must have 3 sources (including one book). </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2 & 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Use your notes and bibliography (pages 1 & 2) to develop pages 3-7. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 3 – a fictional but realistic story about how you came to live where you live. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 4 – Describe a typical day of your life from morning until night. Include a description of your work, meals, </li></ul><ul><li>and fun activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 5 – List at least 5 problems that you have and what the government can do to make your life more bearable. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 6 – Write at least ¾ page diary entry or series of smaller entries that tells you inner thoughts about your life and your relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Page 7 – A U.S. map on which you have marked your home. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/library/aaslavry.htm </li></ul>
  • 7. Process Cont’d. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>Government Representative </li></ul><ul><li>Research Day 1 </li></ul><ul><li>You live in Washington, D.C. Research what the government’s policies were during this time for these groups: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a. Native Americans, Slaves, and Pioneers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b. If you are Andrew Jackson, takes notes on his policies and the kind of leader that he was. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bibliography – on a separate piece of paper – must have 3 sources (including one book). </li></ul><ul><li>Day 2 & 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Use your notes and bibliography ( pages 1 & 2) to develop a diary that talks about your feelings about your job and the government’s policies. </li></ul><ul><li>Work with the other government people to compare notes and share information. </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm about the problems that these three groups will talk about and how you can defend your position. </li></ul><ul><li>http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/nc/bio/public/jackson.htm </li></ul>
  • 8. Evaluation Your “Growth of Democracy” project will be graded according to the rubric below: Teacher Name: Cheryl Korbach Student Name:_______________________________________________________ Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Writing Process Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful. Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works and gets the job done. Student devotes some time and effort to the writing process but was not very thorough. Does enough to get by. Student devotes little time and effort to the writing process. Doesn't seem to care. Focus on Assigned Topic The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic. Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic. Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic. No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic. Creativity The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination. There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination. Spelling and Punctuation There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout. There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft. There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft. The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.
  • 9. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations on creating striking and remarkable characters in your presentations! Your diary entries show deep thought and good research. You have all learned a immense amount about these four groups of people who contributed to the United States’ Westward Expansion, Nationalism, Sectionalism, Slavery, and Indian Dispersal. More specifically, you discovered the government’s establishment of a national bank, the mechanizations of the Underground Railroad and the Fugitive Slave Act as well as the differences between a slave and an indentured servant, the Missouri Compromise of 1820 and the Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854, and the Southern Indian Cessions and Removals, 1830s with the last to be forcibly moved by the U.S. Army, The Cherokees along the “Trail of Tears” in 1838. We need to pay special thanks to our panel of government representatives. It is not easy to sit up front and field all the impromptu questions. As you have now ascertained, the growth of the democracy was not a simple or trouble-free development. Thousands of people lost their lives and land, but those that did survive prospered through hard work and perseverance. Lastly, you understand the importance of your rights as citizens to make your voices be heard in government.
  • 10. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Pingnews.com. “President Woodrow Wilson Addresses Congress, 1917.” Online posting. 20 November, 2007. Flickr. 31 May, 2008. http://www.flickr.com/photos/pingnews/2050713336/ . Chung Chu. “U.S. Capitol Building.” Online posting. 22, October, 2006. Flickr. 2 June, 2008. http://www.flickr.com/photos/chung123/276203691/ . Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials.
  • 11. The Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860 [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 8 th Grade Social Studies Designed by Cheryl Korbach [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 12. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed as part of Susan Life’s curriculum for 8 th grade pre-AP 8 th grade U.S. History at Blevins Junior High in Fort Collins, Colorado. http://www.psdschools.org/schools/blevins/ This unit deals with numerous facets of change during the Pre-Civil War era, such as nationalism, sectionalism, the Missouri Compromise of 1820, the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, Indian removal, the Fugitive slave act, westward expansion, and the Jackson presidency. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 13. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson on the Growth of Democracy between 1810 – 1860 is designed to cover social studies at the 8 th grade level, but is also planned to augment the students’ writing and research skills. The assignment is also framed to introduce the students to primary sources, to seek reputable internet sites, and to hone their bibliography skills in either MLA format or Turabian citation style. The students have recently completed the study of the Industrial Revolution and the spread of slavery. In addition, they studied the role of Jefferson's presidency and his agrarian republicanism in forging a national identity. They were also introduced to the first two political parties, the Democratic-Republics and the Federalists. And, they have studied the Louisiana Purchase, the Lewis and Clark expedition and all lessons are supported with geography exercises. They are used to reading from their textbooks and answering guided reading questions from each chapter. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 14. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>As a result of this lesson, students will learn several important key concepts that deal with this time period as well as significant figures. </li></ul><ul><li>Social Studies Standards Addressed </li></ul><ul><li>● 1.3 Students use chronology to examine and explain historical </li></ul><ul><li>relationships. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2.1 Students know how to use the processes and resources of historical inquiry. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.2 Students know how to interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources of historical information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2.3 Students apply knowledge of the past to analyze present-day issues and events from multiple, historically objective perspectives. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.1 Students know how various societies were affected by contacts and exchanges among diverse peoples. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3.2 Students understand the history of social organizing in various societies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4.1 Students understand the impact of scientific and technological developments on individuals and societies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4.2 Students understand how economic factors have influenced historical events. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4.3 Students understand the historical development and know the characteristics of various economic systems. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5.1 Students understand how democratic ideas and institutions in the United States have developed, changed, and/or been maintained. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5.2 Students know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5.4 Students know the history of relationships among different political powers and the development of international relations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>6.2 Students know how societies have been affected by religions and philosophies. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>. </li></ul></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 15. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This Pre-Civil War project is designed to be taught in three or four lessons. Day one the students are introduced to the assignment and provided with the rubric. They also begin their research on day one in the media center. Once there, the students sit together in their synchronized groups and are provided with computers and the affiliated primary and secondary sources. On day two, the students continue their research and writing in the media center and are provided with continued instruction in bibliography formatting, locating maps, and answers to any other questions they have. In addition, the students are assisted by the teacher candidates to deliver individualized instruction to a student and/or a small group of students under the supervision of a mentor teacher. Blevins Junior High is designated as a Professional Development School working in conjunction with Colorado State University’s School of Education. Once the students have completed the research and writing portion of this assignment, they are then ready to present their autobiographies to the U.S. Senate subcommittee as outlined in the four student process slides of this WebQuest. The instructor has previously made the necessary arrangements and reservations with the media center’s librarian, who has reserved one section of the library for this classes use, as well as pulling the requested resources from the shelves. This lesson is not necessarily easy for a novice teacher. It requires some experience with directing debates or role plays. For example, classroom management skills to keep the students on task in the media center and keeping their voice levels at acceptable ranges. Specifically, they were told that an alternative project would be assigned if they could not remain quiet. During the presentation/mock Senate hearings, it is also important to make certain that the students understand that this panel discussion does not reflect the individual student’s viewpoints on racism – it is a reenactment. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>The implements needed in this lesson include the following implements: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They may utilize their assigned textbooks as a reference work, but the overall objective is to promote the use of primary sources. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assistance in locating a printable U.S. Map. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The guided use of the media center’s laptops in locating appropriate and applicable websites. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The students will also require assistance in proper bibliography citations. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Listed below are a few of the recommended websites that were provided in the Student Pages of this WebQuest. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.trailoftears.com </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ramosrick.com/50states.gif </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.americanwest.com/pages/awexpans.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.liu.edu/cwis/cwp/libary/aaslavry.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/bio/public/Jackson.htm </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. Evaluation (Teacher) Story writing: The Growth of Democracy, 1810-1860 Teacher name: Cheryl Korbach [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Writing Process Student devotes a lot of time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works hard to make the story wonderful. Student devotes sufficient time and effort to the writing process (prewriting, drafting, reviewing, and editing). Works and gets the job done. Student devotes some time and effort to the writing process but was not very thorough. Does enough to get by. Student devotes little time and effort to the writing process. Doesn't seem to care. Focus on Assigned Topic The entire story is related to the assigned topic and allows the reader to understand much more about the topic. Most of the story is related to the assigned topic. The story wanders off at one point, but the reader can still learn something about the topic. Some of the story is related to the assigned topic, but a reader does not learn much about the topic. No attempt has been made to relate the story to the assigned topic. Creativity The story contains many creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has really used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions that contribute to the reader's enjoyment. The author has used his imagination. The story contains a few creative details and/or descriptions, but they distract from the story. The author has tried to use his imagination. There is little evidence of creativity in the story. The author does not seem to have used much imagination. Spelling and Punctuation There are no spelling or punctuation errors in the final draft. Character and place names that the author invented are spelled consistently throughout. There is one spelling or punctuation error in the final draft. There are 2-3 spelling and punctuation errors in the final draft. The final draft has more than 3 spelling and punctuation errors.
  • 18. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>The WebQuest model is best suited for learners who can navigate the Web on their own and can read the kinds of material commonly found on the Web. We can stretch the format to reach primary-aged learners, developmental English Language Learners and special populations by creating a facilitated WebQuest, one that requires an adult or older peer to drive things. </li></ul><ul><li>This page includes step by step directions to the facilitator, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>● Assisting the students in organizing themselves into their groups at the media center. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>● Checking out the laptops and providing instruction on proper usage to include turning them off at the end of class and closing them up. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The facilitator can also assist in locating pertinent primary and secondary sources if the student has a special request, a book that was overlooked in the pre-stage/organization of this lesson. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Special questions I encountered from several students were religious-based. Some students who chose to assume the identity of a plantation slave also chose a slave whose faith was Islamic. Here is an example of locating a unique primary source that was not anticipated. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In the presentation portion of the lesson, once every student has taken their turn, it is recommended to ask if anyone who is especially proud of something they wrote that they would like to share with the class. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Another student’s unique request was associated with her identity as a pioneer, and inquired about a “Prairie Schooner,” a specific wagon designed and used during The Oregon Trail. My mentor instructor had a replica of a Prairie Schooner in her classroom to facilitate the student’s understanding. So, the use of visual aids facilitates learning. You can also find helpful information at: http://www.endoftheoregontrail.org/wagons.html </li></ul></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 19. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The students will have gained knowledge of this particular time period by analyzing history through the experiences of those who were there, as revealed through their research, creative writing, diaries that describe their typical day and the problems associated with their way of life and through the practice of debate. A Teacher’s Reflection I have come to a frightening conclusion. I am the decisive element in my classroom. It is my personal approach that creates the climate. It is my daily mood that makes the weather. AS a teacher, I possess tremendous power to make a child’s life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of injustice or an instrument of inspiration and leadership. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or deescalated, and a child humiliated or uplifted. ~ Author unknown Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 20. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Pingnews.com. “President Woodrow Wilson Addresses Congress, 1917.” Online posting. 20 November 2007, Flickr. 31 May 2008. http://www.flickr/photos/pingnews/2050713336/ . Chung Chu. “U.S. Capitol Building.” Online posting. 22 October, 2006. Flickr. 2 June, 2008. http://www.flickr.com/photos/chung123/276203691 . Lana Stewart. “Thank you card.” Online posting. 17 August, 2007. Flickr. 2 June, 2008. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lanastewart/1148127718/ I would like to thank Susan Life for her exceptional instruction as my mentor teacher during Spring 2007 semester at Blevins Junior High, Poudre School District, Fort Collins, Colorado. In addition, special thanks to Dr. Jean Radin and Liliana Castro for their outstanding teaching in the Teacher Licensure Program at Colorado State University. The poignant mantra for our class with Dr. Radin and Ms. Castro was “Kids don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care”. Lastly, a special thank you to Dr. James Folkestad for his brilliant instruction in the latest and most innovative technological methods as they pertain to his students as future educators. Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion

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