The 10 Commandments of Case Management        © - RTW Matters       www.rtwmatters.org
1 Communication with the  employee  The first communication should  take place as early as possible,  preferably within 24...
2   A coordinator to oversee and    monitor each case    Problems or issues are identified    early and addressed.        ...
3   Assistance for every employee    with a health condition or injury.    Employee assistance may include    ensuring tha...
4   Clear information provided for    coworkers.    With the injured employee’s    permission, so that they are aware    o...
5   Minimal delays.    In some situations this is simply a    matter of following up with simple    actions as agreed. In ...
6   Regular follow-ups.    Follow-up may comprise a weekly five minute    meeting between the employee and their    superv...
7 Trained and skilled case managers   Whether a supervisor or dedicated RTW coordinator   manages return to work, it is im...
8   Case managers with enough time    to do their job.    The number of cases handled    at one time depends upon the    d...
9 Documented case management  procedures.  Documenting case management  procedures is important so that  staff know what t...
10   A week-one RTW briefing     meeting with injured employees.     Despite the existence of documented procedures,     e...
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The 10 Commandments of case management

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The 10 Commandments of case management

  1. 1. The 10 Commandments of Case Management © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  2. 2. 1 Communication with the employee The first communication should take place as early as possible, preferably within 24 hours of the injury or illness, and regular communication should continue throughout the case. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  3. 3. 2 A coordinator to oversee and monitor each case Problems or issues are identified early and addressed. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  4. 4. 3 Assistance for every employee with a health condition or injury. Employee assistance may include ensuring that the employee has: – High quality medical care, including primary and specialist care; – A sound understanding of their condition; – Any aids or appliances that may be necessary; and, where relevant – Assistance with domestic services in the early stages. For example, domestic assistance would be appropriate for a person with an arm fracture who is unable to clean the house, or someone with a leg fracture who is unable to drive. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  5. 5. 4 Clear information provided for coworkers. With the injured employee’s permission, so that they are aware of his or her needs upon return to work. Supervisors should also be informed, so that too they have an understanding of the persons difficulties. Giving supervisors background information about the case facilitates employee-supervisor collaboration in planning productive and meaningful modified duties. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  6. 6. 5 Minimal delays. In some situations this is simply a matter of following up with simple actions as agreed. In other cases, it can require considerable effort to overcome the many potential obstacles that arise from bureaucratic compensation systems. For example, a number of telephone calls may be required to confirm that liability is accepted for an operation without delay. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  7. 7. 6 Regular follow-ups. Follow-up may comprise a weekly five minute meeting between the employee and their supervisor, or a regular phone call to someone who is off work. Follow-up aims to check on progress and deal with issues as they arise. – Employees should also have the ability to follow up issues. An employee with an injury should be provided with clear advice about who to contact if there is a problem. For example, this may be: – The supervisor as the first point of call; – HR for problems with pay, or if the person does not feel their supervisor is responding to their needs; and – For more complex cases, a particular, trusted manager within the organisation to deal with any issues that arise. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  8. 8. 7 Trained and skilled case managers Whether a supervisor or dedicated RTW coordinator manages return to work, it is important that they are trained in: – Processes and legislation; – Active listening; – Dealing with problematic situations; – Basic ergonomics; and – Individual health conditions and restrictions as they arise. – The life skills of the RTW coordinator are often more important than professional training, but having appropriate training grounds the RTW coordinator and provides a solid base for effective management. In large organisations it may be appropriate that the RTW Coordinator has a tertiary or a professional qualification. A trained RTW coordinator can often spend time up-skilling others within the organisation. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  9. 9. 8 Case managers with enough time to do their job. The number of cases handled at one time depends upon the demands of each case and any other workload — in principle, 30 to 60 cases is a full-time workload. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  10. 10. 9 Documented case management procedures. Documenting case management procedures is important so that staff know what to expect. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
  11. 11. 10 A week-one RTW briefing meeting with injured employees. Despite the existence of documented procedures, employees will often not read or take notice of information until they are faced with a situation, so it is sensible to refresh an employees understanding of return to work procedures after injury occurs. – An early meeting with the employee to let them know about the employers approach, how the system works, and what is expected of them can make a substantial difference. It is pragmatic to make this meeting part of the case management procedures. – At the week-one meeting the employee should receive information about: – Their pay level over time; – Return to work systems and what is expected of them; – The roles of those involved in return to work management, such as the supervisor and the production manager; – The role of the claims or insurance manager; – What is expected in terms of certificates, how they are completed and who they need to be handed to; – How to get the most out of the system; – How to problem-solve return to work issues; and – What they can do to contribute positively and get the best outcome. © - RTW Matters www.rtwmatters.org
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