Modern architecture part1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Modern architecture part1

on

  • 5,131 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
5,131
Views on SlideShare
5,124
Embed Views
7

Actions

Likes
5
Downloads
443
Comments
0

2 Embeds 7

https://blackboard2.dcccd.edu 4
https://dcccd.blackboard.com 3

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Modern architecture part1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MODERN ARCHITECTURE Is an overarching movement and period in architectural history during the 20 th century.
  • 2. MODERNISM
    • - broadly characterized by simplification of form and subtraction of ornament from the structure and theme of the building (architecture definition)
  • 3. Notable Architects
    • Frank Lloyd Wright – designed the Price Tower, a 19-story tower in Oklahoma and the Solomon Guggenhein Museum, a warm beige spiral building in New York City.
  • 4. Notable Architects
    • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe – one of the pioneering masters of Modern Architecture. Notable for Villa Tugendhat, his European masterwork in Czech Republic and the 860-880 Lake Shore Drive, twin tower apartment buildings in Chicago.
  • 5. Notable Architects
    • Le Corbusier – a pioneer in studies of modern design. It was his Villa Savoye in France that most succintly summed up his five points of architecture.
  • 6. ORIGINS According to some historians, modern architecture is developed as a result of social and political revolutions. It is closely tied to the project of Modernity and thus the Enlightenment. Others view it as primarily driven by technological and engineering developments. Others regard it as matter of taste: a reaction against eclecticism and the lavish stylistic excesses of Victorian & Edwardian architecture.
  • 7. ADVANCES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
    • INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
    • the availability of newly-available building materials such as iron, steel & sheet glass drove the invention of new building techniques.
    • 1796 – Shrewsbury mill owner Charles Bage first used his ‘fireproof’ design, which relied on cast iron & brick with flag stone floors.
    • Early 1830s – Eaton Hodgkinson introduced the section beam, which lead to widespread use of iron construction.
  • 8. ADVANCES IN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY
    • Great Exhibition of 1851 – Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace was an early example of iron & glass construction.
    • 1864 – first glass & metal curtain wall construction.
    • 1890 – William Le Baron Jenney & Louis Sullivan’s steel-framed skyscraper in Chicago was developed.
  • 9. EARLY YEARS The architects around the world began developing new solution to integrate precedents with new technological possibilities.
  • 10.
    • Art Nouveau ("New Art“)
      • In Russian - "Модерн”
      • In Spanish - “Modernismo”
      • In English - “Modern”
      • It is in the book by Otto Wagner, the fallout of the First World War would result in additional experimentation and ideas.
  • 11. IN THE UNITED STATES
    • First examples of modern architecture:
    • 1904 Wright’s Larkin Building in Buffalo, NY
    • 1905 Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois
    • 1910 Robie House in Chicago
  • 12. IN ITALY: FUTURISM
    • Futurist Architecture
      • Began in Early 20 th century
      • Characterized anti-historicism and long horizontal lines.
      • Themes include technology and urgency.
  • 13. Manifesto of Futuricism
    • First manifesto produced by FiIippino Tommaso Marinetti in 1909
    • Attracted poets,musicians,artists such as Umberto Boccioni,Giacomo Balla, Fortunato Depreso and architects like Antonio Sant’ Elia .
    • Antomio Sant’ Elia- built little (being killed in WWI)
  • 14. IN RUSSIA: CONSTRUCTIVISM
    • Construction
      • A new style resulting from the 1907 revolutions ,the societal upheaval and change coupled with a desire for a new aesthetic in Communist to Neoclassicism.
      • Prospered but full markedly out of favor during the design competition for the Palace of the Soviets 1931-1933,losing to Post constructivism.
  • 15.
    • Post constructivism
      • More traditional revivalism of Russian architecture with nationalistic overtones.
      • Resulted in the ultimate demise o the Russian branch of early architectural modernism.
  • 16. IN WESTERN EUROPE
    • Deutscher Werkbund(German Work Federation)
      • German association of architects, designers, industrialists which spanned the gap but then Arts and Crafts movement and the modernism of 1903.
      • Founded in 1907 in Munich at the instigation of Herman Muthesius .
  • 17. RISE OF MODERNISM
    • Modern architecture
      • 1920s,serves as the most important figures establishment of their reputations.
      • Peter Behrens
        • Trained the big three:Le Corbusier in France;
        • Walter Gropuis and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in Germany
  • 18.
    • Bauhaus
      • European school and associated concerned with reconciling craft tradition and industrial technology.
      • The directors are Gropius and Mies van der Rohe,also designed the German Pavilion (Barcelona Pavilion)
  • 19.
      • Its purpose was to sponsor the attempt to integrate traditional crafts with the techniques of industrial mass production.
      • De Stijl – “The Style”
            • An art and design movement developed unique to the Netherlands resulted from isolation during WWI.
            • Characterized by use of line and primary colors .
  • 20. INTERNATIONAL STYLE
    • Museum of Modern Art
      • 1932- The International Exhibition of Modern Architecture was held .
    • Philip Johnson and collaborator Henry-Russell Hitchcock
      • identified architecture as stylistically similar and having a common purpose.
  • 21.
    • Most commonly use materials are glass for the façade(usually curtain),steel for exterior support and concrete for the floor.
    • The style became most evident in the design of skycrapers
  • 22.
    • TheSeagram Building,
    • New York City, 1958, by
    • Ludwig Mies van der Rohe,
    • is regarded as one of the
    • finest examples of the
    • functionalist aesthetic and
    • a masterpiece of corporate
    • modernism.
  • 23. In United States
    • Richard Neutra
      • Designed the Lovell House and Case Study Houses in Los Angeles.
      • 1946 and 1966- twenty or so homes were built primarily in and around Los Angeles
      • Nuetra, Americans Charles and Ray Eames (the Eames House) have attracted hundreds of thousands of visitors.
  • 24.