Article Summary and Reflections Group Presentation

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  • 1. Kate Gaustad Chelsea McConnell Pamela Mouchaham Rachel Blomeyer ECE 7706 Kennesaw State University Summer 2013
  • 2. What were the “big ideas” from your readings?  The most important ideas we discussed include inquiry, integration, and inclusion.  We must use inquiry to allow our students to explore and investigate on their own. They must take control of their own education in order for it to be meaningful. Integration is crucial in covering all of the curriculum, especially with science. Making connections is the best and most effective way for students to learn. Lastly, inclusion is imperative.
  • 3. What were the “big ideas” from your readings?  We must make education all encompassing. Every child deserves a chance to learn and grow in the way they are most comfortable. As teachers, it is our job to find out what that way may be, and then cater to our students’ individual needs. When students discover on their own, they take ownership in their learning.  In Mangrubang’s article, we found out that there is a shortage in science teachers. Because of this, principals are placing teachers in positions they are not qualified to teach.
  • 4. What were the “big ideas” from your readings?  Assessment was another “big idea” topic in our articles. Student learning should not always be measured through a standardized test. The use of authentic assessments allows teachers to see what students have truly learned or internalized, while multiple choice questions tend to show lower level learning most of the time.
  • 5. What do we need to be thinking about when we teach science in the elementary schools?  We need to think about our students’ individual and unique needs. All students learn differently, and we as teachers must be mindful of this. It is very important that we know our students, and recognize (and praise) their individual qualities. Lessons should be differentiated in order to suit all of their needs. Teachers must remember what they were taught in regards to technology so that they may pass this information on to their students (Mangrubang, F.R. 2005).
  • 6. What do we need to be thinking about when we teach science in the elementary schools?  As teachers, we need to understand that science concepts need more than a 45 minute slot to be learned. Students need to make discoveries on their own through inquiry-based learning. We can give our students more time to complete a topic/lesson through a multiple day lesson. This will allow for more inquiry-based learning to take place.
  • 7. What do we need to be thinking about when we teach science in the elementary schools?  As educators, we need to consider and incorporate collaborative learning for students. For many students, this is the best chance at learning. This provides memorable experiences for students, as well as helps them understand concepts better. We also need to think about how important science education is to our students. Learning about science concepts once a week is not adequate for students’ learning.
  • 8. How is what you learned from the articles reflected in your science teaching?  Although we don’t use inquiry-based, problem- based, or project-based learning 100% of the time in science, we found ourselves proud about our teaching. We use textbooks as a resource and try our best to create meaningful learning experiences. Students are engaged in activities in positive learning environments. Most of our articles mentioned inquiry-based. Two of our group members work at IB schools, so their units of inquiry usually have a science and/or social studies focus.
  • 9. How is what you learned from the articles reflected in your science teaching?  Each of us would like to integrate math into science more so than we do now. The STEM articles posted were interesting to us as we have implemented this technique in our classrooms, sometimes without even realizing it. After reading articles about STEM we realize how important the integration of science, technology, engineering and math really is and we are proud to know that we reflect these ideas within our teachings.
  • 10. How is what you learned from the articles reflected in your science teaching?  Since there seems to be a lot of shortages in qualified science teachers, we feel that teachers need better trainings for science teaching. This class has helped with this matter. A quote from Preparing tomorrow's science teachers to use technology: Guidelines for Science educators says, “The work of scientists embraces an array of technologies, and major accomplishments in science are often accompanied by sophisticated applications of technology (Flick, L., & Bell, R. 2000). ” We know that integration is important, but so too is application. As teachers we must make it a goal to not only integrate, but to also apply the information and make connections.
  • 11. How can what you learned inform your science teaching moving forward?  We know that science is most efficiently taught when it is student led, and hands on. Allowing students to be inquirers, and guide their own instruction is a great way to ensure engagement. As the article, Issues and Trends in Science Education: The Shortage of Qualified Science Teachers states teachers must be properly trained in order to be effective and successful teachers (Mangrubang, F.R. 2005). Students learn best when they are interested. The best way to do this is to allow students to ask questions, and then provide them with learning opportunities to figure out their own answers.
  • 12. How can what you learned inform your science teaching moving forward?  As stated in the article, Elementary Science: Where are we now?, “educators want to use the inquiry-based science curriculum materials recommended by the standards but were restricted by non-academic considerations such as funding” (Sandall, 2003). As teachers, we have to find a way to teach science through inquiry-based learning without being restricted by the non- academic considerations.
  • 13. How can what you learned inform your science teaching moving forward?  Additionally, when science is integrated with other subjects, as stated in the STEM article, we prepare our students for global career opportunities. The article America’s Children: Providing Early Exposure to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Initiatives summarizes that by implementing the STEM initiatives at an early age, our students are more likely to succeed in higher education (Dejarnette, N. K.“, 2012). Through integration, students become more internationally minded. If we strive to create classroom environments that integrate science in all subjects, students will like science more and more. For so long, science has been put on the back burner and it is important that we make it a priority just like any other subject. We all have to admit, it is hard to incorporate science in every subject, but while reading these articles, we have learned that we must do so in order to move our science teaching forward.
  • 14. Bibliography Dejarnette, N. K. (2012). America's Children: Providing Early Exposure to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Initiatives. Education, 77-84. Flick, L., & Bell, R. (2000). Preparing tomorrow's science teachers to use technology: Guidelines for Science educators. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education [Online serial], 1 (1). Retrieved from :http://www.citejournal.org/vol1/iss1/currentissues/science/article1.htm Guney, B. G., & Seker, H. (2012). The Use of History of Science as a Cultural Tool to Promote Students' Empathy with the Culture of Science. Educational Sciences: Theory And Practice, 12(1), 533-539. Mangrubang, F.R. (2005). Issues and Trends in Science Education: The Shortage of Qualified Science Teachers. American Annals of the Deaf, 150(1), 41-46. Sandall, B. R. (2003). Elementary Science: Where Are We Now? Journal of Elementary Science Education, 13-30.