Subcultures andConsumerBehaviorCHAPTERTWELVE
SubcultureSubcultureA distinct cultural groupthat exists as anidentifiable segmentwithin a larger, morecomplex society.2Co...
Relationship Between Culture andSubculture - Figure 12.23Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hal...
Examples of Major Subcultural CategoriesTable 12.14Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chap...
Nationality Subculture - Hispanic• Stronger preference for well-establishedbrands• Prefer to shop at smaller stores• Prefe...
6Nationality Subculture – HispanicU.S. Hispanic Population by Place of OriginFigure 12.36Copyright 2010 Pearson Education,...
Religious Subcultures• 200+ organized religious groups in the U.S.• Primary organized faiths include:– Protestant denomina...
Regional Subcultures• Many regional differences exist inconsumption behavior– Westerners have a mug of black coffee– Easte...
Major Racial SubculturesAfrican American• The African American Consumer– 13 percent of the U.S. population– Purchasing pow...
Major Racial SubculturesAfrican American• Prefer leading brands over private-labelbrands• Brand loyal• Higher than average...
Major Racial SubculturesAsian American• Fastest growing racial segment• Diverse group including 6 major ethnicities:– Chin...
Major Age Subcultures12Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
Generation Y• According to sources, born 1977-1994 OR1982-2000• Three groups– Gen Y Adults – 19-28– Gen Y Teens – 13-18– G...
Generation X• Born between 1965 and 1979• No rush to marry, start a family or workexcessive hours.• Do not like designer l...
Baby Boomers• Born between 1946 – 1964• More than 40 percent of the adult population• Motivated consumers• Not anxious to ...
Older Consumers• Roughly 65 years and older• Growing segment due to better medical care,declining birthrate and the aging ...
Older Consumers• Segmentation can also be done onmotivations and quality-of-life orientation• Cyberseniors17Copyright 2010...
How Seniors Use the InternetFigure 12.91818Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twel...
Issues in Understanding Gender as aSubculture• Sex Roles and Consumer Behavior– Masculine vs. Feminine Traits• Consumer Pr...
Working Women• Segments of ALL women– Stay-at-home– Plan-to-work– Just-a-job working– Career-oriented working2020Copyright...
SubculturalSubculturalInteractionInteractionMarketers should striveto understand howmultiple subculturalmemberships jointl...
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Chapter ppt 12 - copy-1

  1. 1. Subcultures andConsumerBehaviorCHAPTERTWELVE
  2. 2. SubcultureSubcultureA distinct cultural groupthat exists as anidentifiable segmentwithin a larger, morecomplex society.2Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  3. 3. Relationship Between Culture andSubculture - Figure 12.23Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  4. 4. Examples of Major Subcultural CategoriesTable 12.14Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  5. 5. Nationality Subculture - Hispanic• Stronger preference for well-establishedbrands• Prefer to shop at smaller stores• Prefer to cook with fresh foods vs frozen orprepared foods.• Large and strong family structure. Familyoriented.• Youths are more fashion conscious than non-Hispanic peers5Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  6. 6. 6Nationality Subculture – HispanicU.S. Hispanic Population by Place of OriginFigure 12.36Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  7. 7. Religious Subcultures• 200+ organized religious groups in the U.S.• Primary organized faiths include:– Protestant denominations– Roman Catholicism– Islam– Judaism• Consumer behavior symbolically andritualistically associated with the celebration ofreligious holidays.7Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  8. 8. Regional Subcultures• Many regional differences exist inconsumption behavior– Westerners have a mug of black coffee– Easterners have a cup of coffee with milk andsugar– White bread is preferred in the South andMidwest– Rye and whole wheat are preferred on the Eastand West coasts8Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  9. 9. Major Racial SubculturesAfrican American• The African American Consumer– 13 percent of the U.S. population– Purchasing power estimated at $845 billion9Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  10. 10. Major Racial SubculturesAfrican American• Prefer leading brands over private-labelbrands• Brand loyal• Higher than average trips to grocery storeand higher spending• Spend more then other segments ontelephone services10Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  11. 11. Major Racial SubculturesAsian American• Fastest growing racial segment• Diverse group including 6 major ethnicities:– Chinese, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, Korean,and Japanese• 95% live in metropolitan areas and businessownership is high• Increasing buying power• Diverse so few trends• Many prefer ads in English11Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  12. 12. Major Age Subcultures12Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  13. 13. Generation Y• According to sources, born 1977-1994 OR1982-2000• Three groups– Gen Y Adults – 19-28– Gen Y Teens – 13-18– Gen Y Tweens 8-12• Twixters – 21-29 and live with parents13Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  14. 14. Generation X• Born between 1965 and 1979• No rush to marry, start a family or workexcessive hours.• Do not like designer labels, are cynical, and donot want to be marketed to1414Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  15. 15. Baby Boomers• Born between 1946 – 1964• More than 40 percent of the adult population• Motivated consumers• Not anxious to retire and handle it as:– Opportunity for a new start– A continuation of preretirement life– Unwelcome disruption– Transition to old age1515Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  16. 16. Older Consumers• Roughly 65 years and older• Growing segment due to better medical care,declining birthrate and the aging of the largebaby boomer segment• Three segments by age– The Young-Old (65-74)– The Old (75-84)– The Old-Old (85 and older)16Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  17. 17. Older Consumers• Segmentation can also be done onmotivations and quality-of-life orientation• Cyberseniors17Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  18. 18. How Seniors Use the InternetFigure 12.91818Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  19. 19. Issues in Understanding Gender as aSubculture• Sex Roles and Consumer Behavior– Masculine vs. Feminine Traits• Consumer Products and Sex Roles• Women as depicted in Media19Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  20. 20. Working Women• Segments of ALL women– Stay-at-home– Plan-to-work– Just-a-job working– Career-oriented working2020Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide
  21. 21. SubculturalSubculturalInteractionInteractionMarketers should striveto understand howmultiple subculturalmemberships jointlyinfluence consumersbehavior21Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Twelve Slide

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