Consumer AttitudeFormation and ChangeCHAPTEREIGHT
AttitudeA learnedpredisposition tobehave in aconsistentlyfavorable orunfavorable mannerwith respect to agiven object.2Copy...
What Are Attitudes?• The attitude “object”• Attitudes are a learned predisposition• Attitudes have consistency• Attitudes ...
Structural Models of Attitudes• Tricomponent Attitude Model• Multiattribute Attitude Model• The Trying-to-Consume Model• A...
CognitionA Simple Representation of the TricomponentAttitude Model - Figure 8.35Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Pub...
The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeThe knowledge andperceptions that areacquired by acombination of dir...
The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeA consumer’semotions or feelingsabout a particularproduct or brandCo...
The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeThe likelihood ortendency that anindividual willundertake a specific...
Issues in Attitude Formation• How attitudes are learned– Conditioning and experience– Knowledge and beliefs9Copyright 2010...
Issues in Attitude Formation• Sources of influence on attitude formation– Personal experience– Influence of family– Direct...
Strategies of Attitude ChangeChanging the Basic Motivational FunctionAssociating the Product with an Admired Group or Even...
Changing the Basic Motivational FunctionUtilitarianEgo-defensiveValue-expressiveKnowledge12Copyright 2010 Pearson Educatio...
Discussion Questions• What products thatyou purchaseassociate themselveswith an AdmiredGroup or Event?13Copyright 2010 Pea...
Attitude Change• Altering Components of the MultiattributeModel– Changing relative evaluation of attributes– Changing bran...
Behavior Can Precede or FollowAttitude FormationCognitive DissonanceTheory• Holds that discomfortor dissonance occurswhen ...
Issues in Attribution Theory• Self-Perception Theory• Attributions toward Others• Attributions toward Things• How We Test ...
Chapter 8Questions?17
Case 8-2: It’s a Whirlpool fromGermany• Do you think American consumers would viewthe Whirlpool washing machine differentl...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Chapter ppt 08 student

227 views
124 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
227
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chapter ppt 08 student

  1. 1. Consumer AttitudeFormation and ChangeCHAPTEREIGHT
  2. 2. AttitudeA learnedpredisposition tobehave in aconsistentlyfavorable orunfavorable mannerwith respect to agiven object.2Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  3. 3. What Are Attitudes?• The attitude “object”• Attitudes are a learned predisposition• Attitudes have consistency• Attitudes occur within a situationCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 3Chapter Eight Slide
  4. 4. Structural Models of Attitudes• Tricomponent Attitude Model• Multiattribute Attitude Model• The Trying-to-Consume Model• Attitude-Toward-the-Ad ModelCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 4Chapter Eight Slide
  5. 5. CognitionA Simple Representation of the TricomponentAttitude Model - Figure 8.35Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  6. 6. The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeThe knowledge andperceptions that areacquired by acombination of directexperience with theattitude object andrelated informationfrom various sourcesComponents6Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  7. 7. The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeA consumer’semotions or feelingsabout a particularproduct or brandComponents7Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  8. 8. The Tricomponent Model• Cognitive• Affective• ConativeThe likelihood ortendency that anindividual willundertake a specificaction or behave in aparticular way withregard to the attitudeobjectComponents8Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  9. 9. Issues in Attitude Formation• How attitudes are learned– Conditioning and experience– Knowledge and beliefs9Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  10. 10. Issues in Attitude Formation• Sources of influence on attitude formation– Personal experience– Influence of family– Direct marketing and mass media• Personality factors10Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  11. 11. Strategies of Attitude ChangeChanging the Basic Motivational FunctionAssociating the Product with an Admired Group or EventResolving Two Conflicting AttitudesAltering Components of the Multiattribute ModelChanging Beliefs about Competitors’ Brands11Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  12. 12. Changing the Basic Motivational FunctionUtilitarianEgo-defensiveValue-expressiveKnowledge12Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  13. 13. Discussion Questions• What products thatyou purchaseassociate themselveswith an AdmiredGroup or Event?13Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  14. 14. Attitude Change• Altering Components of the MultiattributeModel– Changing relative evaluation of attributes– Changing brand beliefs– Adding an attribute– Changing the overall brand rating• Changing Beliefs about Competitors’Brands14Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  15. 15. Behavior Can Precede or FollowAttitude FormationCognitive DissonanceTheory• Holds that discomfortor dissonance occurswhen a consumer holdsconflicting thoughtsabout a belief or anattitude object.Attribution Theory• A theory concernedwith how people assigncausality to events andform or alter theirattitudes as an outcomeof assessing their ownor other people’sbehavior.15Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  16. 16. Issues in Attribution Theory• Self-Perception Theory• Attributions toward Others• Attributions toward Things• How We Test Our Attributions– Distinctiveness– Consistency over time– Consistency over modality– Consensus16Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide
  17. 17. Chapter 8Questions?17
  18. 18. Case 8-2: It’s a Whirlpool fromGermany• Do you think American consumers would viewthe Whirlpool washing machine differently ifthey knew it was manufactured in Germany?• How might a consumer use the attitude-toward-object model to evaluate specificbrand/models of washing machines18

×