• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Focus on Publishers
 

Focus on Publishers

on

  • 4,748 views

A presentation advocating the implementation of unobtrusive badges when distributing your content to blogs and social networks held at webwatch at ebay UK in August 2007.

A presentation advocating the implementation of unobtrusive badges when distributing your content to blogs and social networks held at webwatch at ebay UK in August 2007.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,748
Views on SlideShare
4,501
Embed Views
247

Actions

Likes
5
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 247

http://www.wait-till-i.com 140
http://icant.co.uk 52
http://wait-till-i.com 51
http://www.netvibes.com 4

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Focus on Publishers Focus on Publishers Presentation Transcript

    • Focus on web publishers The forgotten audience Christian Heilmann, Yahoo UK Ebay, London, 30.08.2007
    • Who is this?
      • Christian Heilmann
      • Lead Interaction Architect at Yahoo UK
      • Author of several books with long titles full of web development gobbledegook.
    • Who is this?
      • Blogger and web magazine author for several years.
      • Speaker at several conferences for web development and accessibility.
    • Who is this?
      • Coffee addict.
      • No TV owner
      • No car owner
      • Foreigner.
    • We all love distribution
      • As service and media providers we want our information out on the web.
      • Having third parties link to our products gives them credibility.
      • It also makes search engines give us some good lovin’
    • We all love distribution
      • Lots of search engine love is a good thing.
    • Why do people link to us?
      • They like the content
      • They want the kudos to be the first to have found something cool on the web.
        • Quirky auctions
        • Inappropriate imagery (pet snake)
        • Bargains
    • Why do people link to us?
      • They want to enhance and verify their own content.
        • “ Photos of our event on flickr”
        • “ Find the same camera on ebay”
        • “ Find other movies or albums by that awesome artist.”
    • Why do people link to us?
      • They want a slice of the pie!
        • Text ads
        • Search referrals
        • Sales referrals
        • Freebies by referral
    • How can we make people link to us?
      • Banners
      • Badges
      • Widgets
      • APIs
    • What are publishers?
      • There are several types of publishers on the web.
      • Each of these have different approaches and needs.
      • Each have their place and help us distribute our goodies.
    • Consumers / Connectors
    • Consumers / Connectors
      • These people do not care about technology, all they want is use the services we offer.
      • They primarily want to use the technology to connect to other people.
    • Consumers / Connectors
      • This could be
        • dating,
        • chatting with people with the same interests or
        • keeping up with family and friends.
    • Consumers / Connectors
      • Products of interest:
        • Webmail
        • Chat systems
        • Instant Messaging
    • Consumers / Connectors
      • These people are the big mass, the ones that keep a constant stream of revenue flowing.
      • They are also great for reaching out to people you can’t reach.
    • Content Publishers
    • Content Publishers
      • These are the folks that create content for social sites and the web.
      • That mythical 10% that is responsible for 90% of what we call UGC.
    • Content Publishers
      • Bloggers,
      • Video editors,
      • Photographers,
      • Writers,
      • Poets,
      • Musicians,
      • (…)
    • Content Publishers
      • These people want to publish what they have done.
      • They are interested in the platforms they use for that.
    • Content Publishers
      • Products of interest:
        • blogging systems
        • image editing suites
        • audio and video software and services
    • Content Publishers
      • They do fiddle with these tools, but are not that interested in developing.
      • The main focus is to create content and get kudos for having created it.
    • Content Publishers
      • This group should be very dear to our hearts.
      • They are the “early adopters” of products and inspire other people to try them out.
      • They are a minority, but one with a massive voice.
    • Developers
    • Developers, Developers, Developers
    • Developers
      • These are the real “early adopters” who develop publication platforms.
      • However, they are not as vocal as they spend time developing, not blogging about it.
    • Developers
      • They are very important to us, as they bring products to content producers.
      • They also help us improve our products immensely.
      • However, they require a special communication voice and tone.
    • What do publishers give us?
    • What do publishers give us?
      • Their trust (our systems will be available)
      • Their screen estate
      • Link love
      • Visitors (people WILL leave their sites)
    • What do we give publishers?
    • What do we give publishers?
      • The connectors and the developers are easy to make happy.
      • All they want is systems that work, and they can use.
      • However…
    • Avoid the one big mistake
    • Avoid the one big mistake
      • Applications need to be available
      • They also need to be secure – I trust you with my data
      • They also need to tell me when I do things wrong (no, “password” is NOT a viable password)
    • Avoid the one big mistake
      • If you offer an API, show commitment.
        • It has to be available 24/7
        • It has to be backward compatible = plan it well
        • It has to have output formats catered to different needs.
    • An API is for life, not just for the next press release!
    • Avoid the one big mistake
      • Be all ears:
        • Offer mailing lists frequented by people in the know
        • Take on improvement requests and give feedback on these
        • Support new platforms when they crop up.
    • What do we give publishers?
    • What do we give publishers?
      • Catering to consumers is easy, we know them as our users.
      • Catering to developers is also easy, we have those living in a habitat in the office anyways.
      • Publishers, however are a different beast.
    • What do we give publishers?
      • As we are not sure of how they work we offer badges and widgets that are really catered to consumers.
    • What do we give publishers?
      • Fixed functionality
      • Fixed size
      • Fixed design
      • Keeping the brand secure
      • Targeted at bringing users to our sites.
    • What do we give publishers?
      • Let’s take a look at a schema of a publisher site.
      • This could be a blog, a small web site, a myspace or facebook account or even a profile in a photo or video sharing site.
    •  
    • Navigation, Search, This is what this is
    • CONTENT
    • Me, Me, Me
    • BADGE
    • BADGE
    • Obtrusive
      • We expect people to like our stuff so much, they give up theirs.
      • The reasons are:
        • Being scared of brand washout
        • Not wanting to deal with technical support
        • “ We know best” mentality
    • Obtrusive
      • But what about the brand of the publisher?
      • What about banner blindness?
      • What about the technical issues?
    • Technical issues?
    • Technical issues
      • A lot of banners and badges were built to work in outdated browsers.
      • What worked in 1998 does not necessarily perform well these days.
      • Web sites and applications these days get more and more complex.
      • Outdated tricks and workarounds stand in the way of these.
    • Technical issues
      • Every request to another server when the page is loading is slowing it down immensely.
      • A lot of banners and badges have a Russian Doll behaviour – it looks like one request but become many more.
    • Technical issues
      • Sloppy code might interfere with other scripts in the page.
      • There is no way to find out what is going on in the third party code, users need to trust it and it is hard to reproduce errors.
    • Unobtrusive
      • Just Google it :-)
      • Badges and widgets could become unobtrusive.
      • We allow the publisher to decide the look and feel.
      • We also allow the publisher to place the content in the right context.
    • CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT relevant badge content CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT
    • CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT relevant badge content CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT BADGE
    • Me, Me, Me My ebay stuff My photos My videos
    • Me, Me, Me My ebay stuff My photos My videos My ebay stuff BADGE
    • Power to the publisher
      • That way, we can profit from the competence of the publisher.
      • Users can choose when to see the badge which counteracts banner blindness.
      • Choosing already means showing interest = more likely to result in a transaction.
    • Seeding opportunities
      • If your API is read and write this also means you have a seeding opportunity.
      • Relevant visitors of the publisher site can enter information or upload data from a site they trust, and don’t have to go to one they can’t be bothered about.
    • Content distribution is a leap of faith
    • Show me the money!
      • Premature monetization is the death of good distribution models.
      • Web surfers are a cynical bunch, and publishers even more so.
      • Distribution mechanisms are first and foremost an opportunity to raise product awareness and link love.
    • Show me the money!
      • Give out free and good, and good things will come back to you.
      • It worked for me.
    • Thanks!
      • Christian Heilmann
      • [email_address]
      • http://wait-till-i.com
      • http://icant.co.uk
      http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
    • Credits
      • “ File not Found” by Ape Lad:
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/apelad/1266913887
      • “ Connect 4” by Banalities
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/richardsummers/379654824/
      • “ Publisher” by Jason Cartwright
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jasoncartwright/168646014/
      • “ Developer’s Paradise” by Nik Cubrilovic
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/perfected/348699072/
      • “ stretchcat” by Constintina
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/constintina/550573052/
      • “ Give” by Neil McQuaid
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcquain2/689551864/
      • “ Riley the Golden Retriever”
      • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jennykhan/306241846
      • “ This is Sparta”, “Smiling Cat”, “You Rock”, “Beaker” found on the Internets