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Developer Evangelism
 

Developer Evangelism

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My introduction to tech evangelism held in Bangalore, India. The session was 2 hours, hence the size:)

My introduction to tech evangelism held in Bangalore, India. The session was 2 hours, hence the size:)

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    Developer Evangelism Developer Evangelism Presentation Transcript

    • Developer Evangelism Christian Heilmann, Bangalore, India, 21/10/2008
    • नम#$ Namaste
    • I’m Chris.
    • Today I was asked to tell you how to be an evangelist.
    • The issue is that I can’t do that.
    • Being an evangelist is something that can’t be taught.
    • We’re not sales people.
    • However, I can listen, I can help and I can give you the information you need.
    • I’ll do this by showing you how I approach it.
    • This might work for you, too.
    • However, you know your culture and what makes people interested here much better than I do.
    • Which is where you need to find your own style to get the messages across.
    • One thing every evangelist needs is enthusiasm.
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/psd/2928474683/
    • If you don’t believe in it...
    • ... if you don’t want to play with it...
    • ... don’t pretend to.
    • Developers can smell lies really quickly.
    • You want people to get excited about what you evangelise...
    • ...not having to defend it.
    • Sometimes you also need to curb your enthusiasm a bit.
    • You want to come across as an expert telling people about something cool...
    • ...not like a 12 year old on a sugar rush.
    • A concept that is really important is that of being an independent voice.
    • Yes, we work for a certain company...
    • ...but that doesn’t mean we need to love everything they do.
    • It also doesn’t mean that anything other companies do is worse or not of interest to us.
    • You got to know what other people do to learn from their victories and mistakes.
    • If you present something, people will ask how this compares to other products.
    • If you know about the other product, then you can tell them.
    • If the other product is better, don’t claim it isn’t.
    • We should be confident enough to admit that competitors do good things.
    • The most important thing is that people can trust your judgement.
    • Which is where your presence comes in.
    • Be visible and be interested in what people are talking about.
    • Mailing Lists Forums Social Bookmarking Microblogging (yeah, twitter) Blogging Social Networks IRC
    • Use the internet for your storage and distribution.
    • Flickr Upcoming Del.icio.us Slideshare Google reader Facebook / Orkut / Hi5... Mahalo
    • The more you spread, the more channels are there to reach you.
    • Let’s talk a bit about communication.
    • Things to do before you communicate to developers in any way:
    • 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Make sure that you are up-to-date on the matter before you go and speak about it. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Do not promise things that are not under your control. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Your communication should be targeted to the audience. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • People came to talk to you with an agenda – if you fulfill that agenda you win. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • You cannot be the expert in everything. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • For the tricky questions have an expert at hand to answer them for you. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • If there is no expert available at the time note down the question and follow it up 1. Get your facts right after consultation. 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Do not promise to come back to someone and forget it – that’ll make you look like you needed a 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs fast way out! 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Your communication should be in the right format for the group. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • This can range from slides over videos and audio to live coding exercises or online step-by- 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs step examples. 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • 1. Get your facts right http://icanhaz.com/stickyevent 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Things will go wrong. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Be prepared: have your slides online, on a memory stick, plan to use a whiteboard... 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Don’t expect any fancy technology to be available. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Secretly every communication hardware hates humans. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • You will not be online in 99% of the cases. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Relying on audio and video is asking for trouble. 1. Get your facts right 2. Know the audience and their needs 3. Have expert backup 4. Choose the right medium 5. Plan for failure
    • Things to be aware of during communicating.
    • 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • You will find dozens of books and videos on how to be a great presenter. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Nothing makes you a better presenter though than being who you are. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • You should not have to play a role or dress up. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • If you believe in what you do, you will be great. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • The best asset is confidence. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways Jason Calacanis at LeWeb3: 4. Prepare to steer Q&A http://blip.tv/file/536742 5. Be honest and real
    • ...or being so honest and scared but competent that people just have to feel sympathy. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways Jake Archibald at @media Ajax 4. Prepare to steer Q&A http://www.flickr.com/photos/patolucas/2862381584/ 5. Be honest and real
    • It is all about communication. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • So if you give a talk, tell people that it is OK to ask questions. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Make space in your presentations for that. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Ask the audience questions, make them participate. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • People should have the chance to concentrate on what you are saying. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • So don’t make them feel they have to jot things down. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Have a URL where they can download your information afterwards – say that this exists. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Have all the links in a presentation as a tag on – for example – delicious. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Say upfront what you will cover and what they will get out of it. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Have time for Questions and Answers. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Be in control of Q&A. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • A lot of times you will have people who don’t ask questions but profile themselves instead. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Deal with that accordingly – and swiftly. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • People will have real questions that need answering. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • If you don’t know an answer – do *not* speculate. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Ask the audience if someone knows – if not, offer to investigate further and swap contact details. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • There is no harm in not knowing something. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • There is harm in lying though. 1. Be yourself 2. Invite communication 3. Prepare takeaways 4. Prepare to steer Q&A 5. Be honest and real
    • Following up communication.
    • Whatever you do – it is important to cuddle afterwards.
    • In this case make sure you email everyone who gives you a business card (this can become time consuming)
    • Make sure to blog, upload recordings and photos and publish your slides immediately!
    • It shows respect to those who came to see you talk, and invites those who missed it.
    • Have contact options available after your talk – emails, twitter and so on.
    • Do not use company mails or IM information though – protect your channels.
    • Let’s talk about writing (f.e. for a blog) a bit.
    • 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Simple is not easy. It is also not stupid. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Simple takes a lot of work and thorough understanding of the subject. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you explain things in as easy as possible terms you will reach the most you can 1. Simple is not stupid reach. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Read and re-read what you’ve written (take breaks in between) and make it 1. Simple is not stupid as easy as possible. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Avoid being condescending – you can oversimplify, too. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Comparisons with real life objects work very well to simplify complex matters. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Your heading and introductory text are the most important things of a blog post. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Both determine how easy it will be to find the post in the future. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Newspapers have conditioned us to write clever, witty and interesting 1. Simple is not stupid headlines with pop 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it references. 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • These don’t translate well to other cultures. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • So do we want to be creative and witty for a minute or do we want to provide valid 1. Simple is not stupid information for 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it several months? 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • At the start of any post state what happened, where and how. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Continue to explain what is coming in the post. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • This’ll prevent any confusion and get interested people on the way to find out 1. Simple is not stupid more. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Does that stifle creativity? 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Maybe, but let’s not forget the environment you publish in: 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Technical online writing is about keeping things short and to the point. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • People are busy, and want the facts. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • So in order to write great posts, write them, read them, delete what is not 1. Simple is not stupid needed, read again, 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it delete more and so 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference on. 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you cannot take anything away any longer, you’ve reached the point of 1. Simple is not stupid publication. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you have a lot to cover, why not split it up into several posts? 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you can, add relevant media to the post. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • An introductory photo invites the eye and lures the brain into reading what 1. Simple is not stupid happened. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • We’re lucky that these days embedding video, audio and slides is as easy as 1. Simple is not stupid copy+paste. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Embedding ties our information together in a nice, easy to digest bundle. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • It also allows visitors to skim over the post the first time and come back to take in 1. Simple is not stupid the rest (watch the 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it video, download the 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference podcast) later. 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • This also helps people who have a hard time reading but are very much capable of 1. Simple is not stupid listening or seeing. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Structure is very important – give readers landmarks to take in your 1. Simple is not stupid information one 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it chunk at a time. 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • This means a clever hierarchical heading structure. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • It also means short sentences. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • It means paragraphs dealing with one thing at a time. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • It means using lists to explain step-by-step processes or give an overview of what is 1. Simple is not stupid available. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • For large documents it also means providing a table of contents which allows 1. Simple is not stupid for bookmarking 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it sections. 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you eat food past the “best before” date you get sick. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • If you don’t time stamp your publications they will be considered great 1. Simple is not stupid forever. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • They’ll be quoted – sometimes badly – and re-iterated over and over again. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Our technical environment moves at breakneck speed though. 1. Simple is not stupid 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • What was “best practice” half a year ago might very well be “considered 1. Simple is not stupid harmful” now. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • So let’s make sure that readers know when a certain document was written 1. Simple is not stupid and choose to follow 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it its advice even now. 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • The last, very important point is to cite other sources and link to content you 1. Simple is not stupid have built upon. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • By citing other sources (and reading them of course) you validate your 1. Simple is not stupid thoughts and facts. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • Readers don’t have to trust you blindly – they can make up their mind by 1. Simple is not stupid comparison. 2. Say what it is – don’t sugar-coat it 3. Size matters 4. Media can make a difference 5. Structure is good 6. Date your content 7. Cite to prove
    • What about presenting?
    • This is very much dependent on your style and what you are comfortable with.
    • Things that work for me:
    • 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Introducing yourself, however briefly breaks down an initial barrier. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • You are not any longer this unreachable person on stage or at the head of the table – 1. Introduce yourself you are a normal 2. Use humour person. 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Explain why you are competent to talk about the matter at hand. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Then put the ego away – people came for information, not to see you sing and dance. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Humour is important to keep a long presentation interesting. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I like to put in things that people just don’t expect – to keep both me and them on the 1. Introduce yourself ball. 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Humour also makes things more approachable. We tend to use humour to deal with things 1. Introduce yourself that scare us. 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Humour also allows for a memorable moment – it is a different kind of structuring and 1. Introduce yourself providing 2. Use humour landmarks. 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I like to bring up real world examples and comparisons. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • The rationale is that they make very theoretical and hard to grasp data more easy to 1. Introduce yourself consume for 2. Use humour humans. 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Real world comparisons also allow for emotion – and emotional responses are very 1. Introduce yourself powerful and make 2. Use humour us remember. 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Speaking at the right pace makes you easy to understand. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • If you appear rushed, listeners will feel uneasy. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Trying to keep up is a terrible feeling and makes us feel inadequate. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • So speak slowly, with meaning and concentrate on pronouncing things thoroughly. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Pauses are good. They allow listeners to take information in and digest it in the way they know 1. Introduce yourself best. 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I am so bad at this! :) 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • “Hello World” examples are easy to show. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • They are also useless, as they teach a syntax, but not the concept of a language or 1. Introduce yourself solution. 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • There is no personal value in “Hello World”. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • We should teach how to solve issues and fulfill tasks. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I yet have to be asked in a professional product to produce “Hello World”. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • It is *much* better to have a real production example to build upon. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • “This is what we had to create – here are the specs” 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • “This is the final outcome” 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • “Here’s what we used to deliver this job” 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • “... and here is how you can do it yourself!” 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Build on top of what people are asked to do, not what you expect them to do for you. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I always try to deliver fresh material. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • I hate re-using presentations and training material. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • The least I do is to bring some new, fresh angle. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Check what is hot at the moment, research it and add it to the talk. 1. Introduce yourself 2. Use humour 3. Build bridges to the real world 4. Pace yourself 5. Avoid “hello world” 6. Be fresh
    • Last but not least – know your arsenal.
    • You should know where to find information about the products you advocate.
    • Including the communication channels (internal and external) to reach those in charge.
    • So, let’s stop this presentation and go through them.
    • THANKS! Christian Heilmann | http://wait-till-i.com | twitter: codepo8