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Reg voting
Reg voting
Reg voting
Reg voting
Reg voting
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Reg voting
Reg voting
Reg voting
Reg voting
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Reg voting
Reg voting
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Reg voting
Reg voting
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Reg voting

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 2. SECTION 1The Right to Vote Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 3. SECTION 1The Right to Vote• How have voting rights changed over time in the United States? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 4. SECTION 1The Right to Vote• How have voting rights changed over time in the United States?• What constitutional restrictions exist on the States’ power to set voting qualifications? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 5. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 6. The History of Voting Rights Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 7. The History of Voting Rights• The Framers of the Constitution purposely left the power to set suffrage qualifications to each State. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 8. The History of Voting Rights• The Framers of the Constitution purposely left the power to set suffrage qualifications to each State.• Suffrage means the right to vote. Franchise is another term with the same meaning. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 9. The History of Voting Rights• The Framers of the Constitution purposely left the power to set suffrage qualifications to each State.• Suffrage means the right to vote. Franchise is another term with the same meaning.• The electorate is all of the people entitled to vote in a given election. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 10. The History of Voting Rights• The Framers of the Constitution purposely left the power to set suffrage qualifications to each State.• Suffrage means the right to vote. Franchise is another term with the same meaning.• The electorate is all of the people entitled to vote in a given election.• Initially, the right to vote in America was limited to white male property owners. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 11. The History of Voting Rights• The Framers of the Constitution purposely left the power to set suffrage qualifications to each State.• Suffrage means the right to vote. Franchise is another term with the same meaning.• The electorate is all of the people entitled to vote in a given election.• Initially, the right to vote in America was limited to white male property owners.• Today, the size of the American electorate is greater than 200 million people. Nearly all citizens at least 18 years of age can qualify to vote. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 12. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 13. Setting Voter Qualifications Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 14. Setting Voter QualificationsThe Constitution sets five limits on the power that States have to set voter qualifications: Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 15. Setting Voter QualificationsThe Constitution sets five limits on the power that States have to set voter qualifications: Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 1
    • 16. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 17. Universal Requirements Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 18. Universal RequirementsThere are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 19. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 20. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship• Most States require United States citizenship in order to vote. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 21. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship• Most States require United States citizenship in order to vote.Residence Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 22. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship• Most States require United States citizenship in order to vote.Residence• One must berequire residencyof a minimumvote in elections. in Most States a legal resident for State to amounts of time order to vote in the State. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 23. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship• Most States require United States citizenship in order to vote.Residence• One must berequire residencyof a minimumvote in elections. in Most States a legal resident for State to amounts of time order to vote in the State.Age Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 24. Universal Requirements There are three factors that States require people to meet to be eligible to vote.Citizenship• Most States require United States citizenship in order to vote.Residence• One must berequire residencyof a minimumvote in elections. in Most States a legal resident for State to amounts of time order to vote in the State.Age• The 26th Amendment requires that no State set a minimum voting age above 18. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 25. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 26. Political Participation and Awareness in America Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 27. Political Participation and Awareness in America Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 28. Want to connect to the Magruder’s link for this section? Click Here! Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 29. Section 2 ReviewWant to connect to the Magruder’s link for this section? Click Here! Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 30. Section 2 Review1. The three universal requirements States use for a person to be eligible to vote are (a) residence, gender, and income. (b) citizenship, property ownership, and gender. (c) citizenship, residence, and age. (d) income, employment, and age.Want to connect to the Magruder’s link for this section? Click Here! Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 31. Section 2 Review1. The three universal requirements States use for a person to be eligible to vote are (a) residence, gender, and income. (b) citizenship, property ownership, and gender. (c) citizenship, residence, and age. (d) income, employment, and age.2. The 24th Amendment forbids the use of (a) poll taxes. (b) alcohol. (c) literacy tests as a means of voter qualification. (d) the death penalty.Want to connect to the Magruder’s link for this section? Click Here! Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 2
    • 32. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 33. SECTION 4Voter Behavior Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 34. SECTION 4 Voter Behavior• What is the nonvoting problem and what is its scope? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 35. SECTION 4 Voter Behavior• What is the nonvoting problem and what is its scope?• Why do people not vote? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 36. SECTION 4 Voter Behavior• What is the nonvoting problem and what is its scope?• Why do people not vote?• How can we compare the voting behavior of voters and nonvoters? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 37. SECTION 4 Voter Behavior• What is the nonvoting problem and what is its scope?• Why do people not vote?• How can we compare the voting behavior of voters and nonvoters?• What are the sociological and psychological factors that affect voting? Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 38. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 39. Nonvoters Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 40. Nonvoters• Millions of Americans do not vote when elections are held. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 41. Nonvoters• Millions of Americans do not vote when elections are held.• Only 50.1 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the 2000 presidential election, and only 46.3 percent of the electorate voted for the members of the House of Representatives. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 42. Nonvoters• Millions of Americans do not vote when elections are held.• Only 50.1 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the 2000 presidential election, and only 46.3 percent of the electorate voted for the members of the House of Representatives.• Voter turnout significantly decreases in off-year elections, congressional elections held in years when there is no presidential election. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 43. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 44. Why People Do Not Vote Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 45. Why People Do Not Vote• Some people cannot vote for various reasons, such as physical or mental illness, unexpected travel, and resident alien citizenship status. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 46. Why People Do Not Vote• Some people cannot vote for various reasons, such as physical or mental illness, unexpected travel, and resident alien citizenship status.• However, most nonvoters do not vote because Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 47. Why People Do Not Vote• Some people cannot vote for various reasons, such as physical or mental illness, unexpected travel, and resident alien citizenship status.• However, most nonvoters do not vote because • voting is in some way inconvenient, Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 48. Why People Do Not Vote• Some people cannot vote for various reasons, such as physical or mental illness, unexpected travel, and resident alien citizenship status.• However, most nonvoters do not vote because • voting is in some way inconvenient, • they do not believe that their vote will make a difference, or Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 49. Why People Do Not Vote• Some people cannot vote for various reasons, such as physical or mental illness, unexpected travel, and resident alien citizenship status.• However, most nonvoters do not vote because • voting is in some way inconvenient, • they do not believe that their vote will make a difference, or • they distrust politics and political candidates. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 50. Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 51. Sociological Factors Go ToSection: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 52. Sociological FactorsVoter preferences can’t be predicted by just one sociological factor. Voter opinion is acombination of all of these factors and more. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4
    • 53. Sociological FactorsVoter preferences can’t be predicted by just one sociological factor. Voter opinion is acombination of all of these factors and more. Go To Section: 1 2 3 4 Chapter 6, Section 4

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