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Elections
 

Elections

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the election process

the election process

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Elections Elections Presentation Transcript

  • Presentation Pro Magruder’s American Government CHAPTER 7 The Electoral Process© 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc.
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • A Critical First Step Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • A Critical First StepIn the United States, the election process occurs in two steps: Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • A Critical First Step In the United States, the election process occurs in two steps:1. Nomination, in which the field of candidates is narrowed Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • A Critical First Step In the United States, the election process occurs in two steps:1. Nomination, in which the field of candidates is narrowed2. General election, the regularly scheduled election where voters make the final choice of officeholder Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Three Ways to Nominate Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Three Ways to Nominate Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Types of Direct Primaries Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Types of Direct Primaries Closed PrimaryOnly declaredparty members can vote. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Types of Direct Primaries Closed Open Primary PrimaryOnly declared Any qualifiedparty members voter can take can vote. part. Blanket Primary Qualified voters can vote for any candidate, regardless of party Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Types of Direct Primaries Closed Open Runoff Primary Primary Primary If a required majorityOnly declared Any qualified is not met, the twoparty members voter can take people with the most can vote. part. votes run again Blanket Primary Qualified voters can vote for any candidate, regardless of party Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • The Direct Primary Types of Direct Primaries Closed Open Runoff Primary Nonpartisan Primary Primary Primary If a required majorityOnly declared Any qualified is not met, the two Candidates are notparty members voter can take people with the most identified by party can vote. part. votes run again labels Blanket Primary Qualified voters can vote for any candidate, regardless of party Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Primaries Across the United States Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Primaries Across the United States Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Petition Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Petition• Candidates must gather a required number of voters’ signatures to get on the ballot by means of petition. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Petition• Candidates must gather a required number of voters’ signatures to get on the ballot by means of petition.• Minor party and independent candidates are usually required by State law to be nominated by petition. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Petition• Candidates must gather a required number of voters’ signatures to get on the ballot by means of petition.• Minor party and independent candidates are usually required by State law to be nominated by petition.• Petition is often used at the local level to nominate for school posts and municipal offices. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 1
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling PlacesPrecincts Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts• A precinct is a voting district. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts• A precinct is a voting district.• Precincts are the smallest geographic units used to carry out elections. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts• A precinct is a voting district.• Precincts are the smallest geographic units used to carry out elections.• A precinct election board supervises the voting process in each precinct. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts Polling Places• A precinct is a voting district.• Precincts are the smallest geographic units used to carry out elections.• A precinct election board supervises the voting process in each precinct. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts Polling Places• A precinct is a voting • A polling place is where district. the voters who live in a precinct go to vote.• Precincts are the smallest geographic units used to carry out elections.• A precinct election board supervises the voting process in each precinct. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Precincts and Polling Places Precincts Polling Places• A precinct is a voting • A polling place is where district. the voters who live in a precinct go to vote.• Precincts are the • It is located in or near smallest geographic each precinct. Polling units used to carry out places are supposed to be located conveniently elections. for voters.• A precinct election board supervises the voting process in each precinct. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Office-Group and Party-Column Ballots Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Office-Group and Party-Column Ballots Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 2
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Campaign Spending Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Campaign Spending Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing• Early campaign regulations were created in 1907, but feebly enforced. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing• Early campaign regulations were created in 1907, but feebly enforced.• The Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) of 1971 was passed to replaced the former, ineffective legislation. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing• Early campaign regulations were created in 1907, but feebly enforced.• The Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) of 1971 was passed to replaced the former, ineffective legislation.• The FECA Amendments of 1974 were passed in response to the Watergate scandal. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing• Early campaign regulations were created in 1907, but feebly enforced.• The Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) of 1971 was passed to replaced the former, ineffective legislation.• The FECA Amendments of 1974 were passed in response to the Watergate scandal.• Buckley v. Valeo invalidated some of the measures in the FECA Amendments of 1974. Most significantly, it also stipulated that several of the limits that the 1974 amendments placed on spending only apply to candidates who accept campaign money from the government, not those who raise money independently. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Regulating Campaign Financing• Early campaign regulations were created in 1907, but feebly enforced.• The Federal Election Campaign Act (FECA) of 1971 was passed to replaced the former, ineffective legislation.• The FECA Amendments of 1974 were passed in response to the Watergate scandal.• Buckley v. Valeo invalidated some of the measures in the FECA Amendments of 1974. Most significantly, it also stipulated that several of the limits that the 1974 amendments placed on spending only apply to candidates who accept campaign money from the government, not those who raise money independently.• The FECA Amendments of 1976 were passed in response to Buckley v. Valeo. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election Commission Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election CommissionThe Federal Election Commission (FEC) enforces: Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election Commission The Federal Election Commission (FEC) enforces:• the timely disclosure of campaign finance information Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election Commission The Federal Election Commission (FEC) enforces:• the timely disclosure of campaign finance information• limits on campaign contributions Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election Commission The Federal Election Commission (FEC) enforces:• the timely disclosure of campaign finance information• limits on campaign contributions• limits on campaign expenditures Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • The Federal Election Commission The Federal Election Commission (FEC) enforces:• the timely disclosure of campaign finance information• limits on campaign contributions• limits on campaign expenditures• provisions for public funding of presidential campaigns Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Loopholes in the Law Go ToSection: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Loopholes in the Law“More loophole than law…” —Lyndon Johnson Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Loopholes in the Law“More loophole than law…” —Lyndon Johnson• Soft money—money given to State and local party organizations for “party-building activities” that is filtered to presidential or congressional campaigns. $500 million was given to campaigns in this way in 2000. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Loopholes in the Law“More loophole than law…” —Lyndon Johnson• Soft money—money given to State and local party organizations for “party-building activities” that is filtered to presidential or congressional campaigns. $500 million was given to campaigns in this way in 2000.• Independent campaign spending—a person unrelated and unconnected to a candidate or party can spend as much money as they want to benefit or work against candidates. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3
  • Loopholes in the Law“More loophole than law…” —Lyndon Johnson• Soft money—money given to State and local party organizations for “party-building activities” that is filtered to presidential or congressional campaigns. $500 million was given to campaigns in this way in 2000.• Independent campaign spending—a person unrelated and unconnected to a candidate or party can spend as much money as they want to benefit or work against candidates.• Issue ads—take a stand on certain issues in order to criticize or support a certain candidate without actually mentioning that person’s name. Go To Section: 1 2 3 Chapter 7, Section 3