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06 chapter six

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  • Hello and welcome back again to AtTheInstitute.com’s online preparatory course for the National Restaurant AssociationServSafe Manager Certification Exam.
  • In this section (Section Six) we’ll be covering Purchasing, receiving and storage. So without further ado, let’s look at the goals for this section.
  • In this section, we’ll learn the definition of “Approved Supplier”.And we will understand the importance of purchasing from approved, reputable suppliers.We’ll explain how delivery scheduling helps ensure food safety.We will list the procedures and requirements for labeling food prepared and stored in-house.And we will learn the guidelines for storing bothfood and non-food items to prevent contamination and (where necessary) time-temperature abuse.
  • Our definitions for this section:Approved Supplier – An approved supplier is one that has been inspected and meets all applicable local, state and federal laws.FIFO stock rotation – In First-In, First-Out rotation more recent deliveries are labeled and placed behind older deliveries of each item to ensure that the oldest product is always used first.And…ROP (also MAP and Sous Vide) Packaging – Reduced-Oxygen Packaging, Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Vacuum packaging respectively. These packaging methods involve hermetically sealing a product in a material or container.
  • You must purchase food in such a way as to ensure that the food you serve will be safe. Follow these guidelines: Purchase only from Approved, Reputable Suppliers. Remember: An approved supplier is one that has been inspected and meets all applicable local, state and federal laws.Develop a relationship with your suppliers and get to know their food safety practices.Consider reviewing a supplier’s food safety inspection reports.Arrange deliveries so that they arrive one-at-a-time and during off-peak hours. Suppliers must deliver products at times when staff has the time to properly inspect them and put them away.
  • To ensure that the receiving and inspection process is keeping food safe. Follow these guidelines: Make sure you have enough trained staff available to promptly receive, inspect, and store food.Authorize staff to accept, reject, and sign for deliveries.Make sure TCS food deliveries are refrigerated or frozen immediately.When it is necessary to reject an item:set it aside from the items you are acceptingTell the delivery person exactly why you are rejecting the itemGet a signed adjustment or credit-slip before returning or discarding the itemLog the incident on the invoice or receiving document
  • Use Receiving Criteria in your facility. Temperature criteria include:Cold Food must be received at a temperature of 41° F. or lower.Hot Food must be received at a temperature of 135° F. or higher.Frozen Food must be frozen. Reject frozen food if there are signs of thawing and re-freezing, like:Fluid or frozen liquid is in the bottom of the packagingThere are ice crystals present in the product
  • Use packaging criteria: Packaging should protect food and food-contact surfaces from contamination. Reject items for the following reasons:Damage: Tears, holes or puncturing. Also reject cans that are rusted, swollen or dented. Soiled items should also be rejected.Liquid: Reject items that are water-stained, damp, or leaking.Pests: Reject items with signs of pest infestation or damage.Dates: Reject items with expired codes or use-by dates.
  • Set specific specifications or quality standards for the food you order. Reject food if it does not meet these standards and for any of the following reasons:Color: Reject food with an abnormal color.Texture: Reject meat fish or poultry that is slimy, sticky, or dry. Also reject it if the flesh is soft or mushy and leaves an imprint when you touch it.Odor: Reject items with abnormal or unpleasant odors.
  • There are also some specific foods we need to consider.When receiving eggs: Eggs must be clean and unbroken. Reject eggs if that do not meet this criteria and for any of the following reasons:Temperature: Eggs must be received at a temperature of 45° F. or lower. (Why 45° F. instead of 41° F.? When taking the temperature of eggs you are not taking an internal temperature – as there is no practical way to get a thermometer inside an egg. You are taking an external or packaging temperature which will be higher. So 45° F. or lower is permitted.Liquid, Frozen and Dehydrated Eggs: These products must be pasteurized.Inspection Mark: Eggs must have a USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) inspection mark. Eggs must meet USDA grade and safety standards.
  • Milk and Dairy products must be received at 41° F. or lower unless otherwise specified by law. They must also be pasteurized and comply with FDA “Grade A” standards.
  • Shellfish may be received live or shucked (removed from the shell) Note the following guidelines for raw shucked shellfish:Containers & Labeling: Shucked shellfish must be packaged in nonreturnable containers and labeled with the packer’s name, address, and certification number.If the container is smaller than one-half gallon: it must show a sell-by or use-by date.If the container is one-half gallon or larger: it must show the date the shellfish were shucked.
  • Live Shellfish must be received with shell stock identification tag(s).Shell stock Identification Tags must remain attached to the delivery container until all the shellfish have been used. Afterwards, employees must write on the tag, the date that the last shellfish was sold or served from the container. Operations must keep this tag on file for 90 days from the date written on them.Reject shellfish that are muddy, have broken shells or are dead.
  • Sliced melons,cut tomatoes and fresh-cut leafy greens must be received at 41° F. or lower.
  • Prepackaged juice must be purchased from a supplier with a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) Plan. (We will learn about HACCP and HACCP plans in a later section.)It must be treated (that is to say - pasteurized) to prevent, eliminate or reduce pathogens to safe levels.*.
  • Fish suppliers must freeze fish intended to be served raw or undercooked (such as sushi-grade fish), according to specific guidelines to kill potential parasites in the fish.Obtain copies of these records for fish you will serve raw or undercooked and keep them on file for 90 days from the date the last of the fish is served.
  • Fish suppliers must freeze fish intended to be served raw or undercooked, according to specific guidelines to kill potential parasites:Obtain copies of these records for fish you will serve raw or undercooked and keep on file for 90 days from the date the last of the fish is served.
  • In order to keep food and nonfood items safe, it is vital to keep storage areas clean and rotate stock appropriately using the FIFO method..
  • You must label all TCS, ready-to-eat food prepped in-house if it is to held more than 24 hours. The label must include the product name and the date by which it must be sold, eaten, or discarded:You can hold ready-to-eat, TCS foods, prepped in-house for a maximum of seven (7) days at 41° F. or lower.When using previously cooked food: Any item prepared with previously cooked food must use the discard date of the previously cooked item. For example, if using previously cooked chicken to make chicken salad, you must label the chicken salad based on the discard date of the previously cooked chicken.
  • Use the oldest inventory item first. Many operations use the FIFO (First In First Out) method to rotate food products. To do this:Identify the food’s use-by or sell-by dateStore items with the earliest use-by or expiration dates in front of items with later use-by dates.Throw out any item past its manufacturer’s use-by or sell-by date.For bulk-storage items like flour or sugar: Make a schedule to throw out stored food on a specified date. Discard any remaining product. Clean and sanitize and air-dry the container And refill with fresh product.
  • Always store food in containers intended for food. These containers should be durable, leak-proof, and able to be covered or sealed. Never use containers that previously held chemicals.Store food, linens, and single-use items in designated storage areas only.Store all food, linens, and single-use items at least six inches off the floor and away from walls.
  • Keep all storage areas clean and dry.Clean floors, walls, and shelving in storage areas, refrigerators, freezers, and heated-holding cabinets regularly.Clean dollies, carts, trays, and transporters.Always store food in cleaned & sanitized containers.Store dirty linens in clean, washable containers in such a way that prevents the contamination of food and equipment.
  • To properly store refrigerated and frozen items:Maintain refrigeration regularly.Set temperatures to keep cold food 41° F. or lower and frozen food frozen .Monitor the temperature of the food regularly (at least once per shift).Keep refrigerators and freezers closed whenever possible.Use open shelving – Do not line shelves with foil, sheet pans or plastic. Also avoid overloading refrigeration. Refrigerators require good airflow.
  • Also Store foods in such a way as to avoid cross-contamination. In top to bottom order store:Ready-to-eat Foods. (on the Top Shelf) followed byWhole cuts of SeafoodThen Whole cuts of MeatThen Ground Meats & SeafoodAnd finally Poultry (on the Bottom Shelf)
  • Dry storage areas also have requirements for safe storage.Keep dry storage areas cool and dry 50° to 70° F. Store food 6 (six) inches off the floor and away from the wallsMake sure dry storage areas are well-ventilated.
  • We hope you enjoyed learning about safe purchasing, receiving & storage.All of the information provided can be found in The National Restaurant Association’s, ServSafe Essentials, 5th Edition with 2009 FDA Food Code Updates.For more information check out their site online at www.servsafe.com.
  • We urge you to use the review questions for this section before continuing on to section Seven of the ServSafe Course.And we welcome your feedback. Email us at “feedback@AtTheInstitute.com”.For AtTheInstitute.com, this is [your name]. Thank You.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ServSafe™ Exam Prep & Study Guide AtTheInstitute.com
    • 2. 6. The Flow of Food: Purchasing, Receiving & Storage AtTheInstitute.com
    • 3. Section Goals• Know the definition of • List the procedures and “Approved Supplier”. requirements for• Understand the labeling food prepared importance of in-house. purchasing from • Know the guidelines for approved, reputable storing food and non- suppliers. food items to prevent• Explain how delivery contamination and scheduling helps ensure time-temperature food safety. abuse.
    • 4. Definitions• Approved Supplier – A supplier that has been inspected and meets all applicable local, state and federal laws.• FIFO stock rotation – More recent deliveries are labeled and placed behind prior deliveries of each item to ensure that the oldest product is used first.• ROP (also MAP and Sous Vide) Packaging – Reduced-Oxygen Packaging, Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Vacuum packaging respectively. Packaging methods that involve hermetically sealing a product in a material or container.
    • 5. PurchasingYou must purchase food in such a way as to ensure that the food you serve will be safe. Follow these guidelines: • Purchase only from Approved, Reputable Suppliers. Remember: An approved supplier is one that has been inspected and meets all applicable local, state and federal laws. • Develop a relationship with your suppliers and get to know their food safety practices. • Consider reviewing a supplier’s food safety inspection reports. • Arrange deliveries so that they arrive one-at-a-time and during off-peak hours. Suppliers must deliver products at times when staff has the time to properly inspect them.
    • 6. Receiving & InspectingYou must ensure the receiving and inspection process is keeping food safe. Follow these guidelines: • Make sure you have enough trained staff available to promptly receive, inspect, and store food. • Authorize staff to accept, reject, and sign for deliveries. • Make sure TCS food deliveries are refrigerated or frozen immediately. • When it is necessary to reject an item: – set it aside from the items you are accepting – Tell the delivery person exactly why you are rejecting the item – Get a signed adjustment or credit-slip before returning or discarding the item – Log the incident on the invoice or receiving document
    • 7. Receiving Criteria: Temperature• Cold Food must be received at a temperature of 41° F. or lower.• Hot Food must be received at a temperature of 135° F. or higher.• Frozen Food must be frozen. Reject frozen food if there are signs of thawing and re-freezing, like: – Fluid or frozen liquid is in the bottom of the packaging – There are ice crystals present in the product
    • 8. Receiving Criteria: PackagingPackaging should protect food and food-contact surfaces from contamination. Reject items for the following reasons:• Damage: Tears, holes or puncturing. Also reject cans that are rusted, swollen or dented. Soiled items should also be rejected.• Liquid: Reject items that are water-stained, damp, or leaking.• Pests: Reject items with signs of pest infestation or damage.• Dates: Reject items with expired codes or use-by dates.
    • 9. Receiving Criteria: QualitySet specific specifications or quality standards for the food you order. Reject food if it does not meet these standards and for any of the following reasons:• Color: Reject food with an abnormal color.• Texture: Reject meat fish or poultry that is slimy, sticky, or dry. Also reject it if the flesh is soft or mushy and leaves an imprint when you touch it.• Odor: Reject items with abnormal or unpleasant odors.
    • 10. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: EggsEggs must be clean and unbroken. Reject eggs if that do not meet this criteria and the following reasons:• Temperature: Eggs must be received at a temperature of 45° F. or lower.• Liquid, Frozen and Dehydrated Eggs: These products must be pasteurized.• Inspection Mark: Eggs must have a USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) inspection mark, indicating that federal safety regulations have been enforced. Eggs must also meet USDA grade standards.
    • 11. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Milk & DairyMilk and Dairy products must be received at 41° F. or lower unless otherwise specified by law. They must also be pasteurized and comply with FDA “Grade A” standards.
    • 12. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Raw Shucked ShellfishShellfish may be received live or shucked (removed from the shell) Note the following guidelines for raw shucked shellfish:• Containers & Labeling: Packaged in nonreturnable containers and labeled with the packer’s name, address, and certification number. – If the container is smaller than one-half gallon: it must show a sell-by or use-by date. – If the container is one-half gallon or larger: it must show the date the shellfish were shucked.
    • 13. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Live ShellfishLive Shellfish must be received with shell stock identification tag(s).• Shell stock Identification Tags must remain attached to the delivery container until all the shellfish have been used. Afterwards, employees must write on the tag, the date that the last shellfish was sold or served from the container. Operations must keep this tag on file for 90 days from the date written on them.• Reject shellfish that are muddy, have broken shells or are dead.
    • 14. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Sliced Melons & Cut TomatoesSliced melons, cut tomatoes and fresh-cut leafy greens must be received at 41° F. or lower.
    • 15. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Prepackaged JuicePrepackaged juice must be purchased from a supplier with a HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) Plan and must be treated (e.g., pasteurized) to prevent, eliminate or reduce pathogens to safe levels.
    • 16. Receiving Criteria of Specific Foods: Raw & Undercooked FishFish suppliers must freeze fish intended to be served raw or undercooked, according to specific guidelines to kill potential parasites: – Your supplier will provide you with records showing that the fish was frozen correctly. For fish you will serve raw or undercooked, keep these records on file for 90 days from the date the fish is served.
    • 17. Receiving Criteria: Meat & Poultry Inspection StampsMeat and poultry must have a USDA or state department of agriculture’s inspection stamp. – This stamp indicates that the meat/poultry and the processing plant have met certain standards.
    • 18. StoringIn order to keep food and nonfood items safe, it is vital to keep storage areas clean and rotate stock appropriately.
    • 19. Storage Guidelines: LabelingYou must label all TCS, ready-to-eat food prepped in-house if it is to held more than 24 hours. The label must include the product name and the date by which it must be sold, eaten, or discarded:• Time Limit: You can hold ready-to-eat, TCS foods, prepped in-house for a maximum of seven (7) days at 41° F. or lower.• Using previously cooked food: Any item prepared with previously cooked food must use the discard date of the previously cooked item. For example, if using previously cooked chicken to make chicken salad, you must label the chicken salad based on the discard date of the previously cooked chicken.
    • 20. Storage Guidelines: RotationUse the oldest inventory item first. Many operations use the FIFO (First In First Out) method to rotate food products. To do this:• Identify the food’s use-by or sell-by date• Store items with the earliest use-by or expiration dates in front of items with later use-by dates.• Throw out any item past its manufacturer’s use-by or sell-by date.• For bulk-storage items like flour or sugar: Make a schedule to throw out stored food on a specified date. Discard any remaining product. Clean and sanitize the container and refill with fresh product.
    • 21. Storage Guidelines: Temperature• Keep TCS foods at 41° F. or lower.• Check the temperature of food in refrigeration prior to the shift.
    • 22. Storage Guidelines: Product Placement• Store food in containers intended for food. These containers should be durable, leak- proof, and able to be covered or sealed. Never use containers that previously held chemicals.• Store food, linens, and single-use items in designated storage areas only.• Store food, linens, and single-use items six inches off the floor and away from walls.
    • 23. Storage Guidelines: CleaningKeep all storage areas clean and dry.• Clean floors, walls, and shelving in storage areas, refrigerators, freezers, and heated- holding cabinets regularly.• Clean dollies, carts, trays, and transporters.• Store food in cleaned & sanitized containers.• Store dirty linens in clean, washable containers in such a way that prevents the contamination of food and equipment.
    • 24. Refrigerators & Freezers• Maintain refrigeration regularly.• Set temperatures to keep cold food 41° F. or lower and frozen food frozen .• Monitor the temperature of the food regularly (at least once per shift).• Keep refrigerators and freezers closed whenever possible.• Use open shelving – Do not line shelves with foil, sheet pans or plastic. Also avoid overloading refrigeration. Refrigerators require good airflow.
    • 25. Preventing Cross-Contamination In RefrigeratorsStore foods in such a way as to avoid cross- contamination. In top to bottom order:• Ready-to-eat Foods. (Top Shelf)• Whole cuts of Seafood• Whole cuts of Meat• Ground Meats & Seafood• Poultry (Bottom Shelf)
    • 26. Dry Storage• Keep dry storage areas cool and dry – 50° to 70° F.• Store food 6 (six) inches off the floor and away from the walls• Make sure dry storage areas are well- ventilated.
    • 27. ServSafe Essentials ISBN: 0135026520 http://nraef.orghttp://www.servsafe.com
    • 28. JNA Institute of Culinary Arts 215.468.8800 http://culinaryarts.edu

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