Cha2 F&B Organization

37,386 views

Published on

Food and beverage organization

Published in: Education, Business, Technology

Cha2 F&B Organization

  1. 1. Organization of Food & Beverage Operations Food and Beverage Operations Tuesday, May 19, 2009 1 Yesterday we went over the Course Outline and Roles of F&B institutions Aloha Lesson Plan number two How do we approach structure of F&B Operations?
  2. 2. Overview • Managerial, production & service positions • Roles these positions play in providing food service • Organization chart • Organizational structures of various kinds of food service operations • Critical issues before starting your career in food service Tuesday, May 19, 2009 2 We need to understand role of organization of F & B before we begin to dissect it. Managers are at the upper level and usually have most education and experience. Charting the hierarchy structure and roles of operations Issue you need to be aware of before starting a career, any career
  3. 3. Organizational Objectives • Financial / maximize profits • F&B quality • Human relations • Employee training • Societal contribution Organizational Objectives Organizational Structure Tuesday, May 19, 2009 3 Called the Bottom-Line
  4. 4. Three Levels of Management • Top Managers: Food service is labor-intensive • Long-term plans and goals despite technology • Overall business environment • Middle managers: • Short-term goals • Keep communication flowing between upper management and supervisors and employees • Supervisors: • Link between management and employees • Typically use their technical skills Tuesday, May 19, 2009 4 Top Managers earn more but have much more responsibility, accountability and decision-making. Usually a corporate position. Investment on experience and ability to analyze markets, predict growth and hire leaders impact their status Middle managers are the connection between supervisory and top management Usually keen on climbing the corporate ladder and learning structure Supervisors are the link to the line staff, public to management. Also front line employees. Usually have best informations on revenue and profit centers.
  5. 5. Top Managers in a Cooperation Board of Director Chairman of the Board CEO COO President President President A B C Regional VP Regional Director GE A GE B GE C GE D Tuesday, May 19, 2009 5 CEO- chief executive officer COO- chief operations officer Presidents of various venues/branches/operations Regional Managers; USA, N, S, E, W, GM/GE general manager/executive
  6. 6. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  7. 7. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  8. 8. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  9. 9. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  10. 10. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  11. 11. Top Managers in an Independent Restaurant Controller GE Restaurant Bar Catering Executive Chef Manager Manager Director Steward Beverage Banquets &SF Purchasing &Sanitation Production Guest Services Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6 Sub Managers for each OUTLET Operations General Descriptions and Responsibilities
  12. 12. Job Description • An organizational tool that lists the most important tasks, or functions, and responsibilities that must be done by someone working in a specific position. • It includes • to whom the position reports • specifications such as the qualifications needed by the person in the job • salary range for the position • etc. ... Tuesday, May 19, 2009 7
  13. 13. Job Description- Restaurant Manager • Specific Duties 1. Develops & monitors operating budgets 2. Contact for ads/marketing activities, insurance, attorney, banker, and accountant 3. Supervises, schedules, and trains F&B Controller A.R.M 4. Provides info for payroll, tax, and financial statement. Designs cash security & disbursement systems Reviews reports, solves problems 5. Meets with clients; plans and prices events 6. Revenue collection 7. Consults with Chef, Supervisors and Staff Tuesday, May 19, 2009 8 Many of my students in Maui (US) use this as a guide as a potential Managerʼs resume curriculum vitae (CV)
  14. 14. Line vs. Staff • Line Managers: have authority within or over one or more revenue-generating departments that directly provide goods or services to guests • Staff Managers: Provide support and advice to line managers. • No direct impact on bringing revenue • Technical specialists • HR manager • Controller • Purchasing • Others Tuesday, May 19, 2009 9 Amount of responsibility is the difference with salary Staff is fastest way to go for advancement in small business or corporate positions
  15. 15. Typical Production Positions • Chefs-executive, sous (assistant), garde-manger, banquet • Managerial & Production Duties • Plan menu • Recipe standardization • Overall food quality • Food purchase specification • Prepare daily entrees • Plan and oversee special events • Develop procedures for food production Tuesday, May 19, 2009 10
  16. 16. Extra-Curricular Activities are part of Life-Long Learning for Professionals Tuesday, May 19, 2009 11 Maui Chefs judging a recent MCA Student Competition Executive Chef Four Seasons Wailea, Independent Restaurant Mala, Hotel Chef Weston Kaanapali, Maui Chef Instructors
  17. 17. Typical Production Positions (cont.) • Cooks-soup, sauce, fish, roast, pastry, relief, assistant • Bakers-head bakers, assistant bakers, pastry chefs • Pantry (Cold Food) staff • Stewards-chief stewards, porters, dishwashing employees • Storeroom and receiving employees Tuesday, May 19, 2009 12 Typical line kitchen employee positions
  18. 18. Typical Service Positions Dinning room/Restaurant managers Hosts/receptionists Receptionists, put everything in place Food & beverage servers Greet & seat guests, present menus, take guest orders Buspersons Set up tables, removing dirty dishes, lines and other items from the table Bartenders- public Prepare and serve beverages and service Do NOT serve directly in a dining room Cashiers Take reservation, total checks, and collect payments Expediters Coordinators between cooks & servers Runners Curbside servers Tuesday, May 19, 2009 13 Typical Service employee positions Bartenders usually have diverse roles In addition to the knowledge and skill of the craft “MIXOLOGY” they serve, bus, and service the public and other employees at the bar
  19. 19. Typical Service Positions Dinning room/Restaurant managers Hosts/receptionists Receptionists, put everything in place Food & beverage servers Greet & seat guests, present menus, take guest orders Buspersons Set up tables, removing dirty dishes, lines and other items from the table Bartenders- public Prepare and serve beverages and service Do NOT serve directly in a dining room Cashiers Take reservation, total checks, and collect payments Expediters Coordinators between cooks & servers Runners Curbside servers Tuesday, May 19, 2009 13 Typical Service employee positions Bartenders usually have diverse roles In addition to the knowledge and skill of the craft “MIXOLOGY” they serve, bus, and service the public and other employees at the bar
  20. 20. Typical Service Positions Dinning room/Restaurant managers Hosts/receptionists Receptionists, put everything in place Food & beverage servers Greet & seat guests, present menus, take guest orders Buspersons Set up tables, removing dirty dishes, lines and other items from the table Bartenders- public Prepare and serve beverages and service Do NOT serve directly in a dining room Cashiers Take reservation, total checks, and collect payments Expediters Coordinators between cooks & servers Runners Curbside servers Tuesday, May 19, 2009 13 Typical Service employee positions Bartenders usually have diverse roles In addition to the knowledge and skill of the craft “MIXOLOGY” they serve, bus, and service the public and other employees at the bar
  21. 21. Being a Manager requires an applied wealth of Skill and Knowledge in many areas of F&B 14 Tuesday, May 19, 2009 14 For those who aspire to reach the top, investment starts at the bottom. Think about it: What would happen if you owned a business and a key employee did not show up? Would you be able to fill the position if you did not have basic experience or knowledge? Pastry cook vs Line Cook...
  22. 22. Organization Chart for a Small Restaurant Owner/Manager Cook Host/Cashers Ass’t Cook Bartender F&B Servers Dishwashers Tuesday, May 19, 2009 15 Usually the Owner is the Executive Chef or Front of the House Manager Multiple hats and roles to manage and service the business Sometime the bartender doubles as host and cashier
  23. 23. Organization Chart • A diagram that reflects the relationships among various personnel positions in a operation. • Flat vs. multi-level organization - when each is appropriate • Commercial vs. noncommercial structures Handout 1 & 2; Tuesday, May 19, 2009 16 Handout 1 &2
  24. 24. Personal Aptitudes for a Successful Restaurant Professional • Dexterity • Well coordinated motions • Able to concentrate amidst noise and confusion • Develops manual ease and smoothness of action • Moves through crowds with ease • Minimize motions and works in sequence • Communicate well and politely Tuesday, May 19, 2009 17 These are traits to get and keep a job in US as well as Internationally
  25. 25. Personal Aptitudes for a Successful Restaurant Professional (cont.) • Coordination • Able to carry more than one idea or purpose in the mind at the same time • Able to “catalogue” orders and plan work to save steps • Makes both to and from trips pay off, doesn’t travel empty handed • Demonstrates proper sanitation and hygiene habits Tuesday, May 19, 2009 18 Able to lift 50 pounds, milti-task, have a positive attitude and keep a smile
  26. 26. Personal Aptitudes for a Successful Restaurant Professional (cont.) • Quickness • Animated • Brisk • Vigorous • Lively • Readiness to act, a self starter • Accuracy then Speed Tuesday, May 19, 2009 19 “Accuracy then speed” is the motto we believe in
  27. 27. Critical Issues • Jobs can be hard, with long hours • Involve serving others...Happily! • Starting compensation often above minimum wage • Rapid advancement possible • Salaries after five years quite competitive with other industries • Noncommercial opportunities are often underrated • Positions expected to be available in all food service segments Tuesday, May 19, 2009 20
  28. 28. Organizational Review • Business objectives? • Three Types of Managers: • Hierarchy of Responsibility and Power • Roles in Organization Chart • Job Descriptions in F&B • Needs of Industry Workers 21 Tuesday, May 19, 2009 21 Business object: Fiscally healthy, long term growth and profit, low employee turnover Top Managers, Middle Managers, Supervisors Hierarchy is crucial to the F&B business Understanding roles can help create and manage a complex business

×