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REMOVAL OF HEDGEROWS: Impacts of intensive arable farming
What’s happening to hedgerows? <ul><li>Between 1947 and 1985, 175,000 km of hedgerows in </li></ul><ul><li>England and Wal...
Why remove the hedges? <ul><li>Intensive farming has increased dramatically in the last 50 years, due to technological dev...
 
 
 
 
Effects of removing hedgerows: <ul><li>Soil Erosion – high winds and runoff from precipitation can erode soils if hedges a...
Effects of removing hedgerows: <ul><li>Loss of biodiversity – hedges are important habitats for many birds and animals e.g...
Effects of removing hedgerows High  biodiversity Low biodiversity Corridors provided to other habitats Wind and rain cause...
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Removal Of Hedgerows

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Comprehensive revision of issues relating to hedgerow removal

Published in: Economy & Finance, Technology
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Transcript of "Removal Of Hedgerows"

  1. 1. REMOVAL OF HEDGEROWS: Impacts of intensive arable farming
  2. 2. What’s happening to hedgerows? <ul><li>Between 1947 and 1985, 175,000 km of hedgerows in </li></ul><ul><li>England and Wales were removed – 25% of all </li></ul><ul><li>hedgerows. These figures show the total length of hedges </li></ul><ul><li>removed in England and Wales between 1984 and1993 </li></ul><ul><li>(rounded to the nearest thousand kilometres). More </li></ul><ul><li>hedgerows have been removed since 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>1984 1990 1993 </li></ul><ul><li>Loss ( in thousands of km) 563 432 377 </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why remove the hedges? <ul><li>Intensive farming has increased dramatically in the last 50 years, due to technological developments and the CAP. </li></ul><ul><li>To get the biggest yield from their land, farmers must use heavy machinery such as combine harvesters. </li></ul><ul><li>The size of such machinery means that they can only be used efficiently in large fields, in order to minimise turning circles. = hedges removed to make big fields. </li></ul><ul><li>Removing hedgerows literally leaves more space for crops and saves time and money on hedge maintenance. </li></ul>
  4. 8. Effects of removing hedgerows: <ul><li>Soil Erosion – high winds and runoff from precipitation can erode soils if hedges are not there to keep the soil in place. </li></ul><ul><li>This can lead to a decrease in soil fertility. </li></ul><ul><li>Livestock are left without shelter from harsh weather, crops can be damaged by strong winds and rain too. </li></ul>
  5. 9. Effects of removing hedgerows: <ul><li>Loss of biodiversity – hedges are important habitats for many birds and animals e.g. Dormouse, Hedgehogs, Linnets and Butterflies. </li></ul><ul><li>Hedgerows also provide important habitat ‘corridors,’ enabling species to move from one area of habitat to another. </li></ul>
  6. 10. Effects of removing hedgerows High biodiversity Low biodiversity Corridors provided to other habitats Wind and rain cause soil erosion Animals and plants protected from the elements Farmers able to use large machinery Increased crop yield per field Traditional English landscape – looks attractive E.g. Lincolnshire E.g. Devon

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