farming changes

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farming changes

  1. 1. How has farming changed? How have these changes affected the environment? What does it mean for the future of farming?
  2. 2. Mechanisation <ul><li>Machines have taken over many jobs on farms- making workers unemployed . </li></ul><ul><li>Machines are expensive to purchase but in the long term they save time and money. </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy machines can cause soil compaction- meaning soil is no longer suitable for growing crops. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Increased Field Size <ul><li>The use of large machines e.g. combine harvesters has led to an increase in field size, which means the machines can be used more efficiently . </li></ul><ul><li>This has resulted in vast amount of hedgerow being cleared- causing a loss of habitat for wildlife and an increase in soil erosion. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Increased use of chemicals <ul><li>As farms have become more intensive and commercial there has been a drive to grow as many crops as possible- maximising profits. </li></ul><ul><li>This has led to eutrophication in rivers/lakes and many are concerned about the impact chemicals have on their food and are turning instead to organic products. </li></ul><ul><li>Watch the movie on the </li></ul><ul><li>Next slide. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Organic Farming <ul><li>Organic farming is becoming more and more popular. Chemicals are not used in organic farming, therefore much less environmental damage is caused. </li></ul><ul><li>However prices of organic products are higher than traditionally farmed products and yields are lower. </li></ul>
  6. 7. Natural environments <ul><li>The CAP led to a growth in production that eventually led to large food surpluses. </li></ul><ul><li>Set Aside and the Farm Woodland scheme encourage farmers to stop growing crops by offering grants. </li></ul><ul><li>The land then returns to it’s natural state, or trees can be planted to enhance the environment. </li></ul>
  7. 8. Countryside Stewardship Scheme <ul><li>This recently established scheme encourages farmers to look after the countryside they own or manage. </li></ul><ul><li>They are paid up to £300 an acre to conserve and restore landscapes. </li></ul><ul><li>A common place for this to happen is in chalk grassland areas and coastal dunes. </li></ul>
  8. 9. Diversification <ul><li>Diversification is when farmers are encourages to develop activities out of farming to generate more income. </li></ul><ul><li>Some farms have developed camp sites, farm shops, bed and breakfasts, school tours etc to earn more money. </li></ul><ul><li>This, in some cases, is what keeps some farms in business as not enough income is generated from farming itself. </li></ul>
  9. 10. Example of Diversification on a Sheep farm. Bradley Farm, South-West Northumberland (Near Hadrian’s Wall). Farmer employed as a ‘learning officer’ for the National Trust. Accommodation for school visits. Farmer has a contract for cutting local school grass.

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