Drive Electric Northern Colorado
Creating a Model Deployment Community
Who is the Electrification Coalition

The Electrification Coalition (EC) is a nonpartisan, non-for-profit group of
busines...
The Problem - U.S. Oil Dependence
Petroleum fuels account for approximately 40 percent of U.S. primary
energy demand, more...
U.S. Oil Dependence: Household Impact
The average U.S. household spent a record $4,000 on gasoline in 2011.
Since 2000, th...
Electrification Overview
Electrification of transportation offers one of the best solutions for reducing
U.S. oil dependen...
Electricity Prices are Stable Compared to Oil
The volatility of oil and other liquid fuels threatens U.S. and household
ec...
Electrification Overview: Power Sector
A 2007 DOE study found that existing offpeak electrical generating capacity
could p...
The Electric Car: An Overview
With almost 1,000 less moving parts than a gasoline powered
vehicle, electric cars are simpl...
How Do Electric Cars Compare in Price?
Though the upfront cost of electric cars can be more than gasoline powered
cars, th...
Are Evs Good Cars? Awards Through 2013

Chevy Volt

Nissan Leaf

Tesla Model S

2012 European Car of the Year

2011-2013 I...
Electric Vehicles Models and Monthly Sales
Every major automaker has produced an electric vehicle and many plan to
produce...
Electric Vehicle Sales
Electric vehicles have seen healthy sales since their introduction to the
market. Electric vehicle ...
The Deployment Community Concept:

 To facilitate nationwide commercialization of plug-in electric
vehicle (PEV) technolo...
Drive Electric Northern
Colorado:
 The Electrification Coalition (EC), The
City of Fort Collins, the City of
Loveland, an...
General Core Strategy Concepts:

EV Readiness

• Charging infrastructure, codes, regulations, support
services, time of us...
Loveland and Fort Collins:
Why Participate in DENC?
• Green fleet transition: cost savings, environmental benefits
• Econo...
Fleet Transition Case Study:
Loveland, Colorado
Purchase

•The City of Loveland has purchased 5
Nissan LEAFs, which use 3 ...
Key First Year Results for
Fleet Transition
• 1st year’s utilization of one EV was
approximately 4,000 miles (other one 2,...
Other Case Studies
The Electrification Coalition
Revolutionizing Transportation and Achieving Energy Security

›

Online
www.electrificationc...
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NZC - Prochazka

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NZC - Prochazka

  1. 1. Drive Electric Northern Colorado Creating a Model Deployment Community
  2. 2. Who is the Electrification Coalition The Electrification Coalition (EC) is a nonpartisan, non-for-profit group of business leaders committed to promoting policies and actions that facilitate the deployment of electric vehicles on a mass scale in order to combat the economic, environmental, and national security dangers caused by our nation’s dependence on oil.
  3. 3. The Problem - U.S. Oil Dependence Petroleum fuels account for approximately 40 percent of U.S. primary energy demand, more than any other fuel. › Approximately 70 percent of U.S. oil consumption occurs in the transportation sector, with 40 percent in light-duty vehicles. › Transportation is 94 percent reliant on oil-based fuel for energy. U.S. PRIMARY ENERGY DEMAND, 2009 PETROLEUM FUEL DEMAND BY SECTOR, 2009 39% Oil 20% Autos 24% Light-trucks 27% Natural Gas 28% Other Transport 23% Coal 9% Nuclear Energy 3% Hydro electric 22% Industrial 2% Commercial 4% Residential 1% Electric Power Source: BP, plc., Statistical Review of World Energy 2010
  4. 4. U.S. Oil Dependence: Household Impact The average U.S. household spent a record $4,000 on gasoline in 2011. Since 2000, the increase in spending has offset numerous stimulus efforts. › 3.75 Household spending on gasoline increased by $2,008 dollars between 2001 and 2008. › AVG. HOUSEHOLD SPENDING ON GASOLINE (2000-2011) Income tax cuts over the same period increased household income by $1,900. Thus, rising fuel prices fully offset the benefit of tax cuts. › We saw the same effect in 2011 with the payroll tax cut, which increased Americans income by $110 billion while spending on gasoline increased by $104 billion. 5,000 Gas Spending/Household Gasoline Price (Lhs) 3.00 4,000 1.50 2,000 Increased gas spending $/gal 3,000 0.75 0.00 1,000 2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 2011 Source: DOE, EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010; ORNL, Transportation Energy Data Book; SAFE Analysis Dollars (Nominal) 2.25
  5. 5. Electrification Overview Electrification of transportation offers one of the best solutions for reducing U.S. oil dependence, insulating consumers and businesses from oil price volatility. › Electricity is generated from a diverse portfolio of domestic fuels. › The power sector has substantial spare capacity. › Electricity prices are stable. › The network of infrastructure already exists. U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION BY FUEL, 2010 U.S. ELECTRICITY DEMAND BY SECTOR, 2010 49% COAL 38% RESIDENTIAL 22% NUCLEAR 37% COMMERCIAL/OTHER 17% NATURAL GAS 24% INDUSTRIAL 11% RENEWABLES 1% TRANSPORTATION 1% PETROLEUM Source: EIA, AEO 2010 4
  6. 6. Electricity Prices are Stable Compared to Oil The volatility of oil and other liquid fuels threatens U.S. and household economic security. This volatility is driven by events beyond our control. FUEL VOLATILITY INDEX (HISTORICAL) 5.0 Crude Oil - WTI Diesel 4.0 Gasoline Ethanol (Nebraska Rack) Electricity 3.0 Index: Jan 2000 = 1 2.0 › Oil price volatility is driven by events in the global oil market. › In 2012, the average U.S. household spent a record $2,912 on gasoline. › Even with greater oil production, the U.S. cannot avoid price volatility. › In comparison, electricity prices remain relatively flat and predictable. 1.0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 5 Source: DOE, EIA
  7. 7. Electrification Overview: Power Sector A 2007 DOE study found that existing offpeak electrical generating capacity could power 158 million vehicles for up to 33 miles of driving per day. › PJM Interconnect: The 61 gWh of excess available capacity in a typical summer week could charge 62 million Nissan Leafs each night. PJM CAPACITY AND LOAD (7-1, 7-2, 2009) 140 Wholesale Real Time Price Installed Capacity Available Capacity Load 140 100 Gigawatts 80 60 60 40 40 20 0 Source: PJM 6:00 AM 12:00 PM 6:00 PM 12:00 AM 6:00 AM 12:00 PM 6:00 PM $ Per Megawatt Hour 80 0 Crude Oil - WTI Diesel Gasoline Ethanol (Nebraska Rack) Electricity 4.0 100 20 5.0 120 120 12:00 AM Petroleum prices have exhibited significant volatility for the past several years. In contrast, retail electricity prices have been stable. CHANGE IN RETAIL ENERGY PRICES (2000-PRESENT) 180 160 › 3.0 Index: Jan 2000 = 1 2.0 1.0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Source: DOE, EIA
  8. 8. The Electric Car: An Overview With almost 1,000 less moving parts than a gasoline powered vehicle, electric cars are simplistic in design and affordable to operate. › On average, an electric car has ¼ the operational costs of a gasoline powered vehicle. . › A battery pack replaces the internal combustion engine as the primary source of power. › Electric cars can be charged by plugging into a standard outlet or using a charging station.
  9. 9. How Do Electric Cars Compare in Price? Though the upfront cost of electric cars can be more than gasoline powered cars, their lower operating costs make up the difference over time. TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP (INCLUDES FEDERAL TAX CREDIT) $10,000 [SERIES NAME] (BEV) $15,000 Honda Civic EX (ICE) Chevy Volt (PHEV) Ford Focus (BEV) $20,000 Ford Focus SE (ICE) $25,000 includes both purchase cost and operating costs. › Over a five year period, electric $35,000 $30,000 › The Total Cost of Ownership $5,000 $0 5-Year Ownership Cost Note: Based on 12,000 miles annually. Gasoline at $3.50 per gallon and electricity at 11 cents per kWh. Includes costs for home refueling and repair and maintenance. No assumption is made regarding resale value, and purchase is assumed to be cash. vehicles cost the same as or less than an internal combustion engine vehicle for most consumers (with federal tax incentives). › On a per mile basis, an electric car costs 3 cents to drive, whereas a gasoline powered vehicle costs 12 cents to drive. › A BEV owner who drives 14,000 miles a year will save approximately $1,256 in fuel8 costs.
  10. 10. Are Evs Good Cars? Awards Through 2013 Chevy Volt Nissan Leaf Tesla Model S 2012 European Car of the Year 2011-2013 IIHS Top Safety Pick 2013 Consumer Reports best car ever tested; earned a score of 99 out of a possible 100 in the magazine's tests. 2011 Car and Driver Best 10 Cars 2011 European Car of the Year 2013 Motor Trend Magazine “Car of the Year” 2011 North American Car of the Year 2011 World Car of the Year 2013 Automobile Magazine “Automobile of the Year” 2011 Automobile Magazine “Automobile of the Year” Ward’s Auto 10 Best Engines of 2011 2013 World Green Car of the Year. 2011 Motor Trend Magazine “Car of the Year” 2011 Top Crash Safety Rating Time Magazine Best 25 Inventions of the Year 2012 award 2011 & 2012 Consumer Reports rated it first in “owner satisfaction” 2010 Popular Mechanic’s Top / Breakthrough Products 2013 Green Car Reports' Best Car To Buy 2011 Edison Award - Gold in Personal Transportation Time Magazine’s 50 Best Inventions of 2009 2012 CNET Tech Car of the Year for 9
  11. 11. Electric Vehicles Models and Monthly Sales Every major automaker has produced an electric vehicle and many plan to produce more models as well. › There are currently 14 Monthly PEV Sales Chevy Spark 8,000 6,000 RAV4 EV Ford C-MAX Energi Ford Focus Electric Honda Fit EV Prius PHV BMW Active E Mitsubishi i 10,000 Honda Accord Tesla Model S 12,000 Ford Fusion Energi Smart ED Nissan Leaf Chevrolet Volt 4,000 2,000 0 PEV models available from eight automotive manufacturers. › In the first 6 months of 2013, the Tesla Model S captured 8.4% of the luxury vehicle market; the Nissan Leaf was 3.3% of the subcompact market. › The electric vehicle market is seeing 200% year over year growth. Source: hybridcars.com 10
  12. 12. Electric Vehicle Sales Electric vehicles have seen healthy sales since their introduction to the market. Electric vehicle sales are exceeding the initial sales of hybrids. › Compared to hybrids’ US PEV vs. HEV SALES BY YEAR ON MARKET first years on the U.S. market - twice as many plug-in electric vehicles have been sold. 100,000 › PEVs have sold at a rate Units Sold 80,000 that is nearly three times the rate for hybrids in their first 3 years on the market. 60,000 40,000 › PwC Autofacts predicts 20,000 0 Year 1 PEV (2011-2013) Year 2 HEV (2000-2002) Year 3 PEV HEV that, by 2020, PEVs will be 2.8 percent of U.S. auto sales - nearing the percentage of the current hybrid market. Source: hybridcars.com 11
  13. 13. The Deployment Community Concept:  To facilitate nationwide commercialization of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) technology, the engagement and cooperation of a broad group of stakeholders is required. These stakeholders include state and city governments, infrastructure providers, utilities, automakers and other firms, service providers, and regulators. If the necessary ecosystem is not created, commercialization of this technology will proceed far more slowly.  The Electrification Coalition will work with the public and private sector leaders of Fort Collins and Loveland to help identify and implement specific deployment opportunities.
  14. 14. Drive Electric Northern Colorado:  The Electrification Coalition (EC), The City of Fort Collins, the City of Loveland, and Colorado State University have partnered together to create Drive Electric Northern Colorado (DENC) a first-of-its-kind, community-wide initiative  The effort will serve as a “living laboratory,” and will create a scalable and replicable model for implementing deployment communities in other areas of the country.
  15. 15. General Core Strategy Concepts: EV Readiness • Charging infrastructure, codes, regulations, support services, time of use. EV Education • Existing networks, events, institutional opportunities, speakers panel, cost/ROI EV Experience Fleet Consumer Purchase • Car library, car share, rental cars, ride along, corporate educational events, campus programs. • State, city, medium duty, light duty, big and small. • OEM priority, best pricing, dealer coordination, incentives, dealer training.
  16. 16. Loveland and Fort Collins: Why Participate in DENC? • Green fleet transition: cost savings, environmental benefits • Economic development • Create interest and national recognition • Fort Collins and Loveland partnership • Meeting other policy goals • Increased energy and renewables sales • “Get ahead of the curve” – EV grid impacts – Infrastructure planning – Best practices
  17. 17. Fleet Transition Case Study: Loveland, Colorado Purchase •The City of Loveland has purchased 5 Nissan LEAFs, which use 3 charging stations at its utilities office. Financing •The city used a municipal leasing purchase plan to acquire the vehicles, with a full payout (amortization to $1) over two years. Integration •The city estimates that, if driven over 6,000 miles per year, the total costs of owning and operating the LEAFs will result in a 41-percent reduction in cost. Experience •Vehicle reliability, performance, and range have exceeded initial expectations. Employees have warmed to technology.
  18. 18. Key First Year Results for Fleet Transition • 1st year’s utilization of one EV was approximately 4,000 miles (other one 2,000 mi) • 1st year’s mileage reimbursement after the EV’s were put into service for whole City dropped by $8,106 • 1st year’s vehicle O&M cost was reduced $160,000 (10-yr projected savings @2.7M) • Cost f each EV was $355 = $.10/mi. compared to $2.04 for ICE.
  19. 19. Other Case Studies
  20. 20. The Electrification Coalition Revolutionizing Transportation and Achieving Energy Security › Online www.electrificationcoalition.org www.driveelectricnoco.org › Download the Roadmaps www.electrificationcoalition.org/policy › Contacts: Colorado Ben Prochazka 303-717-3657 1111 19th Street, NW Suite 406 Washington, DC 20036 202.461.2360

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