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Presented byPresented by
Dr. Charlotte McCorquodaleDr. Charlotte McCorquodale
Ministry Training SourceMinistry Training So...
Where are you from and
what type of ministry do
you do on behalf of the
Church?
In your experience, what
is one of the mos...
What questions do you have aboutWhat questions do you have about
being nationally certified?being nationally certified?
.
Purpose ofToday’s WorkshopPurpose ofToday’s Workshop
Provide an overview of the new national
certification process and na...
19621962 Vatican IIVatican II
19801980 Called & GiftedCalled & Gifted
19991999 State of the questionsState of the question...
“It calls Church leaders,
ordained and lay, to become
more intentional and effective
in ordering and integrating lay
eccle...
7
Worthy GoalWorthy Goal
““A Culture ofA Culture of
CompetenceCompetence””
(Not Certification)(Not Certification)
Certific...
The Alliance for
Certification of
Lay Ecclesial
Ministers
Alliance = Common PurposeAlliance = Common Purpose
A common approach for assessing
competence for ministry for each of
the...
National CertificationNational Certification
Standards & ProcessStandards & Process
Three goals:
1. To give direction to t...
Who is a lay ecclesial minister?Who is a lay ecclesial minister?
 Authorization of the hierarchy to
serve publicly in the...
Evolution ofEvolution of
CertificationCertification
12
3rd Decade:
Movement into
Certification
2010 Consultation
2011 Appr...
Structure of Revised StandardsStructure of Revised Standards
Alignment with Co-WorkersAlignment with Co-Workers
5 Standard...
Standard One Human:
Lay ecclesial ministers
demonstrate the qualities of
human maturity needed for fruitful
ministry with ...
CULTURAL DIVERSITYCULTURAL DIVERSITY
WITHINTHE STANDARDSWITHINTHE STANDARDS
Core competencies reflect
realities and expec...
What does it meanWhat does it mean
to be nationally certified?to be nationally certified?
((and, what it doesn’t mean!and,...
18
Certification:Certification:
The processThe process
whereby a personwhereby a person
demonstratesdemonstrates
complianc...
How does national certification affectHow does national certification affect
my relationship with my Bishop?my relationshi...
20
Why should IWhy should I
get certified?get certified?
Why NationalWhy National
Certification?Certification?
“Lay persons who devote
themselves permanently or
temporarily to som...
Why National Certification?Why National Certification?
Lay ecclesial ministers’ functions of
collaboration with the ordain...
Benefits of National CertificationBenefits of National Certification
IndividualIndividual DiocesanDiocesan NationalNationa...
24
Are you
certifiable?
National Certification ProcessNational Certification Process
Application for admission to
the process
Preparation of mater...
National Certification ProcessNational Certification Process
Pre-RequisitesPre-Requisites
1.Education in a field related t...
The Application PacketThe Application Packet
Membership in Partner Organization
Baptismal Certificate – long form (Evide...
Application Review ProcessApplication Review Process
28
Preparation of MaterialsPreparation of Materials
Candidates may be assigned an advisor who will assist with
the developmen...
Preparation of MaterialsPreparation of Materials
• Candidates pay candidacy fee
($165) which allows them one
year to submi...
Why is a
portfolio
being used
for
certification?
What will a
certification
portfolio
include?
LEM
32
Types of
Evidence
within
Certification
Portfolio
Certification Portfolio:
Documentation of Competence
1. Evidence of formal
education and formation for
ministry
• Theologi...
Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison
Evidence of Theological StudyEvidence of Theological Stud...
Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison
Evidence of Specialized StudyEvidence of Specialized Stud...
Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison
Demonstration of CompetenceDemonstration of Competence
PC...
Integration Paper 11-15 pages that includes:
• Description of a concrete problem or issue in ministry
(1-2 pages)
• Exposi...
Submission and ReviewSubmission and Review
of Documentationof Documentation
PCRC=Partner Certification Review
Committee (...
Submission and ReviewSubmission and Review
of Documentationof Documentation
All portfolio materials are compiled
and subm...
Congrats you are nationally certified as andCongrats you are nationally certified as and
LEM in your specific role!LEM in ...
To summarize…To summarize…
1. Applicant applies to the Alliance Membership
Organization that is certifying the role for wh...
Our Shared Work...Our Shared Work...
Building a “culture of competence” in lay
ecclesial ministry by advocating for
profes...
What can you do to be a part of thisWhat can you do to be a part of this
national movement towards anational movement towa...
To learn more about and applyTo learn more about and apply
for national certificationfor national certification
◦ Availabl...
Once upon a time…..Once upon a time…..
45
What is one thing from thisWhat is one thing from this
workshop that you want toworkshop that you want to
share with your ...
47
Concluding PrayerConcluding Prayer
by Joseph Cardinal Bernardinby Joseph Cardinal Bernardin
O Lord of the harvest, work...
Thanks for participating
in this workshop!
Follow me onTwitter: @charmccor
Website/Blog:
www.ministrytrainingsource.org
Em...
Presentation CreditsPresentation Credits
The following persons or groups have contributed to
this slide show in some way:
...
LA Congress Workshop National Certification 2014
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LA Congress Workshop National Certification 2014

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  • Kathy leads
    We all run the risk of overstating the importance of our work
    “this is the most important thing to happen to the church since Pentecost!”
    That may be the case here, BUT
    This work truly has enormous ramifications for our field and our organization.
    The level of collaboration among national organizations is unprecedented.
  • Charlotte
    Open up a short audio discussion on why people said yes to being a PCRC member.
  • Charlotte
    Note future webinars cover the specifics of the application and the portfolio.
  • “The ministry leaders who developed these standards and procedures did so to contribute to the continuing development and formation of men and women who serve the Catholic Church in the USA as lay ecclesial ministers….(and) a testament to a powerful shared commitment to well-prepared and fruitful lay ecclesial ministry.”
    From the NATIONAL CERTIFICATION STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES
    FOR LAY ECCLESIAL MINISTERS (p. 3)
  • Alliance now has five members, adding FDLC in 2009
    Five partner organizations are:
    NALM: National Association for Lay Ministry
    NCCL: National Conference of Catechetical Leaders
    NFCYM: National Federation for Catholic Youth Ministry
    NPM: National Association of Pastoral Musicians
    FDLC: Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions
  • These goals imply our core values:
    Goal 1:
    In order to give direction, the work has to be relevant
    Relevance – practicality, usefulness
    Goal 2:
    Affirmation (not elitism)
    Accessibility – regardless of cultural background, geographic location, various starting points
    Respect for diversity – not only cultural diversity, but diversity of starting points, economic circumstances, etc.
    Goal 3:
    Accountability – self-imposed, we are doing this for ourselves
    We know that not every question has been answered yet . . . We haven’t even thought of every question yet!
    But like a compass, these values and goals will continue to guide us as we move forward into uncharted territory.
    High expectations – help push us in the right direction.
  • 1st decade – establishing ourselves as professional organizations
    2nd decade – orgs begin to come together.
    Common Competency Project - NFCYM, NCCL, NALM
    Those three then worked on common standards (2003)
    Added NPM in 2005
    Partners became official “Alliance”
    Publication of Co-Workers in 2005 lent added credibility to common standards
    AND propelled us toward next revision
    3rd decade – move toward certification
    Natural outgrowth. We weren’t ready to take on certification in 90s
    Standards are meant for action
    This is next natural step
    Charlotte
    What does this history tell us? Two things, first it is evolving. Accreditation and Certification Processes have that built into the system. Any organization with certification standards approved by the USCCB?CCA is required to have a review of their standards every 7 years. Why? Understanding that the context of the ministerial roles are changing as well which may require standards to change. Think about how different some aspects of ministry has changed in the past 20 years, before the internet, before all the downsizing, now multiple parish ministries is a reality for more and more LEMS. Plus our knowledge of the work has evolved. I had the privilege of serving as chair of the NFCYM’s certification committee writing our first set of standards in the late 80’s. our first set of standards were so unrealistic that we joke that Jesus would have had a hard time being certified. When I think back to those standards and now to the ones will will look at today the evolution is tremendous.
    Second it tells us that slowly, pastoral ministry organizations have come to value having standards for their ministry area and that working collaboratively makes the most sense, especially in a church that has a workforce of slashers, you know the type DRE/Youth Minister/Minister to the homebound, etc. The need for a common set of standards has been justified by the realities we are facing as a Church. Work has begun to include even more organizations and to make the Common Competencies for lay ecclesial ministers more comprehensive.
    Actually the history spans more than 20 years if we consider national ministry certifications, I feel like I am sharing with you a Paul Harvey moment, now for the rest of the story… In many ways this whole process stands on the shoulders of chaplaincy certifications (hospital, veterans, airport, etc. since the current USCCB/CCA board traces its root back to the Board of Examiners who originally accredited CPE programs and certified hospital chaplains. When I presented the NFCYM standards to the then USCC CCA they couldn't’t understand why we wanted standards approved but didn't’t want to do use them for national certification. It was simple we weren't ready and it has taken us all of these twenty years to become ready, especially joining with the other national organizations to form the Alliance that has given birth to the work we will discuss in today’s webinar. Bob is going to share with us more of the recent history of this work and about the alliance that has formed to share in the vision and work of national certification.
  • Charlotte
  • Charlotte
    The structure of the national standards is that they move from broad and general to more and more specific and measurable. The first part of the common standards apply to all lay ecclesial ministers serving in these roles followed by specialized competencies and indicators that are role specific. This structure was true for both the current set of standards and the revised set with the addition of the indicators in this newest version.
    Briefly highlight the major aspects of the revision of the standards.
    Core standards and competencies page 19
    Specialized competencies on page 24
    Indicators on page 58
  • Charlotte
    Demonstration of competence
  • Make the point that certification is not a certificate.
    National certification is different than a national certificate (education) program.
    This does not take the place of your formation program.
    This builds on training and gives a lay ecclesial minister a chance to show how they can take what they learn in formation and training programs and actually USE it in ministry – certification is about demonstrating competence.
    And only PROGRAMS get accredited!
  • Note: Dioceses without certification may use/honor national certification as they wish.
    National certification does not automatically qualify a person for ministry in every diocese in the country.
    Local ordinary is responsible for AUTHORIZATION which may include a certification process. Authority of the local ordinary/diocese supersedes Alliance (national certification exists to serve them)
  • Why certification? Canon Law calls us to appropriate formation . . .
    How do we know if someone is appropriately formed?
  • Co-Workers provides more support.
  • Individual:
    Salary: don’t laugh – while perhaps not immediately, over time certification can likely have a positive impact on salaries
    For diocesan leaders, a reason for US to be certified is our own credibility with our local ministers.
    Diocesan:
    Save time and money: Developing own certification procedures requires major investment of resources and high degree of interdepartmental collaboration
    Using national process saves an office loads of time, money and headaches
    Having a certification process available and used by your people can help you advocate for your people, the need for qualified, competent people, for salaries, for continuing education budgets, etc.
    *Liability – does this open us up to increased liability? Risk management experts believe this actually protects a diocese more. Shows that diocese does due diligence.
    *National certification is meant to be a help and service to a diocese – not to supersede diocesan policies.
    National:
    Creating a national credential will build credibility and trust for lay ecclesial ministry
    Contribute to dev’t of LEM: Bishops are counting on us to do this – we are the only ones who can
  • Pre-requisites to qualify:
    Education in a field related to your specialization (eg. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent)
    Minimum of 3 years full time or 6 years part time pastoral ministry experience in your specialized ministry (ie. youth ministry)
  • The application includes:
    References (supervisor and two colleagues)
    Ministerial autobiography
    Other standard information:
    Evidence of full communion
    Education/formation history
    Evidence of ministry experience
    Evidence of clean criminal background
    Application fee
  • Assuming the applicant is approved, he/she becomes a candidate for certification.
    Step 2 is the heart of the matter – preparing the materials. (notice we stress that it’s a certification process – the process is the most important part.
    You will be assisted by an advisor – never swim alone!
    Upon acceptance as a candidate, you will conduct a self-assessment to determine your strengths, qualifications, challenges and weaknesses in relation to the certification standards. The self-assessment also includes a checklist of elements to be included in the certification portfolio to determine which have been completed and which remain to be fulfilled. If appropriate, the candidate then draws up a plan for completion of all components in the certification portfolio.
    Portfolios basically consist of:
    Testimony (from self and others)
    Evidence of successful academic study
    Demonstration of ability
    Integration paper
    1. Cover letter – same for all
    2. All initial application materials – same for all
    3. Written assessments – similar for all (candidate, supervisor, peer, subordinate, sometimes diocesan director)
    4. Evidence of theological study
    5. Evidence of specialized study
    6. Demonstration of competence
    7. Integration paper – same for all
    Requirements vary for each partner
  • Assuming the applicant is approved, he/she becomes a candidate for certification.
    Step 2 is the heart of the matter – preparing the materials. (notice we stress that it’s a certification process – the process is the most important part.
    You will be assisted by an advisor – never swim alone!
    Upon acceptance as a candidate, you will conduct a self-assessment to determine your strengths, qualifications, challenges and weaknesses in relation to the certification standards. The self-assessment also includes a checklist of elements to be included in the certification portfolio to determine which have been completed and which remain to be fulfilled. If appropriate, the candidate then draws up a plan for completion of all components in the certification portfolio.
    Portfolios basically consist of:
    Testimony (from self and others)
    Evidence of successful academic study
    Demonstration of ability
    Integration paper
    1. Cover letter – same for all
    2. All initial application materials – same for all
    3. Written assessments – similar for all (candidate, supervisor, peer, subordinate, sometimes diocesan director)
    4. Evidence of theological study
    5. Evidence of specialized study
    6. Demonstration of competence
    7. Integration paper – same for all
    Requirements vary for each partner
  • Why portfolio? Because competence can be demonstrated in so many different ways
    Like an artist’s portfolio, it shows the breadth and depth of a person’s ministry
    All online, website is currently under construction.
    The certification portfolio is a collection of documents assembled by the candidate that provides various types of evidence of one’s competence for a particular lay ecclesial ministry. Based on the National Certification Standards for Lay Ecclesial Ministers, the portfolio includes several different ways by which the candidate can demonstrate his or her competence, including:
     
    testimony, in the form of assessments provided by the candidate, a supervisor, a peer in ministry, and a subordinate;
    evidence of successful academic study in theology, pastoral ministry, and other fields appropriate to each ministry, or other methods (equivalencies) that manifest competence in these areas of study;
    demonstration of ability in one’s own particular ministerial specialization, such as a project, program description, or recital;
    integration paper that shows the candidate’s ability to approach ministry in a way that includes one’s personal, spiritual, intellectual, pastoral, and specialized competencies.
     
    The task group developed a portfolio structure that includes a number of common elements. Within that common structure, each organization has also specified elements particular to individual ministries. For example, while specifying the number of hours of course work expected in theology, pastoral ministry, and other areas of intellectual formation, each organization has also provided for equivalencies—various ways that intellectual competence may be demonstrated.
  • Assuming the applicant is approved, he/she becomes a candidate for certification.
    Step 2 is the heart of the matter – preparing the materials. (notice we stress that it’s a certification process – the process is the most important part.
    You will be assisted by an advisor – never swim alone!
    Upon acceptance as a candidate, you will conduct a self-assessment to determine your strengths, qualifications, challenges and weaknesses in relation to the certification standards. The self-assessment also includes a checklist of elements to be included in the certification portfolio to determine which have been completed and which remain to be fulfilled. If appropriate, the candidate then draws up a plan for completion of all components in the certification portfolio.
    Portfolios basically consist of:
    Testimony (from self and others)
    Evidence of successful academic study
    Demonstration of ability
    Integration paper
    1. Cover letter – same for all
    2. All initial application materials – same for all
    3. Written assessments – similar for all (candidate, supervisor, peer, subordinate, sometimes diocesan director)
    4. Evidence of theological study
    5. Evidence of specialized study
    6. Demonstration of competence
    7. Integration paper – same for all
    Requirements vary for each partner
  • Study must be in at least four of the core disciplines
    equivalencies: examination, research paper, lecture, demonstration or other method approved
  • For certification as a Lay Ecclesial Minister serving as a Youth Ministry Leader, including Pastoral Juvenil Hispana,
    Must show Evidence of study, knowledge and/or skills in history of Hispanic ministry, USCCB documents on Hispanic ministry, Hispanic leadership and cultural competency, and formation-in-action processes where principles of PJH are applied.
  • Assuming the applicant is approved, he/she becomes a candidate for certification.
    Step 2 is the heart of the matter – preparing the materials. (notice we stress that it’s a certification process – the process is the most important part.
    You will be assisted by an advisor – never swim alone!
    Upon acceptance as a candidate, you will conduct a self-assessment to determine your strengths, qualifications, challenges and weaknesses in relation to the certification standards. The self-assessment also includes a checklist of elements to be included in the certification portfolio to determine which have been completed and which remain to be fulfilled. If appropriate, the candidate then draws up a plan for completion of all components in the certification portfolio.
    Portfolios basically consist of:
    Testimony (from self and others)
    Evidence of successful academic study
    Demonstration of ability
    Integration paper
    1. Cover letter – same for all
    2. All initial application materials – same for all
    3. Written assessments – similar for all (candidate, supervisor, peer, subordinate, sometimes diocesan director)
    4. Evidence of theological study
    5. Evidence of specialized study
    6. Demonstration of competence
    7. Integration paper – same for all
    Requirements vary for each partner
  • Since certification is granted by the Alliance, there are three levels of approval.
    There is an appeals process for applications that are denied certification.
    Certification is granted for 7 years, then there is a renewal process.
  • Since certification is granted by the Alliance, there are three levels of approval.
    There is an appeals process for applications that are denied certification.
    Certification is granted for 7 years, then there is a renewal process.
  • As you look at the little children on the tree, which one represents your perspective on national certification?
  • Charlotte & Sean
  • Transcript of "LA Congress Workshop National Certification 2014"

    1. 1. Presented byPresented by Dr. Charlotte McCorquodaleDr. Charlotte McCorquodale Ministry Training SourceMinistry Training Source National Certification Standards & Process for Lay Ecclesial Ministers The Alliance for the CertificationThe Alliance for the Certification of Lay Ecclesial Ministersof Lay Ecclesial Ministers www.lemcertification.orgwww.lemcertification.org 1
    2. 2. Where are you from and what type of ministry do you do on behalf of the Church? In your experience, what is one of the most important issues that needs to be addressed by the Church regarding lay ecclesial ministers ? What is one thing you hope we discuss regarding national certification?
    3. 3. What questions do you have aboutWhat questions do you have about being nationally certified?being nationally certified? .
    4. 4. Purpose ofToday’s WorkshopPurpose ofToday’s Workshop Provide an overview of the new national certification process and national standards. Share the context for understanding national certification by the Alliance including a brief history and review of terms. Reflect on the role that certification plays in the development of Lay Ecclesial Ministry. Answer questions about national certification.
    5. 5. 19621962 Vatican IIVatican II 19801980 Called & GiftedCalled & Gifted 19991999 State of the questionsState of the questions 20052005 Co-workers in the vineyardCo-workers in the vineyard 20112011 National CertificationNational Certification 20252025 What is the future of LEM?What is the future of LEM? 5
    6. 6. “It calls Church leaders, ordained and lay, to become more intentional and effective in ordering and integrating lay ecclesial ministers within the ministerial life and structures of our dioceses.” From Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord 6
    7. 7. 7 Worthy GoalWorthy Goal ““A Culture ofA Culture of CompetenceCompetence”” (Not Certification)(Not Certification) Certification is not an “end” unto itself, but a means directed at the “end” of ensuring faithful, effective and fruitful ministry with God’s people.
    8. 8. The Alliance for Certification of Lay Ecclesial Ministers
    9. 9. Alliance = Common PurposeAlliance = Common Purpose A common approach for assessing competence for ministry for each of the following specialized ministries: Director of Worship (FDLC) Parish Life Coordinator (NALM) Pastoral Associate (NALM) Director of Music Ministries (NPM) Parish Catechetical Leader (NCCL) Youth Ministry Leader (NFCYM) Including Pastoral Juvenil Hispana DiocesanYouth Ministry Leader (NFCYM) Including Pastoral Juvenil Hispana 9
    10. 10. National CertificationNational Certification Standards & ProcessStandards & Process Three goals: 1. To give direction to the future of lay ministry, 2. To recognize and affirm those persons already in ministry, and 3. To promote faithful, competent, and accountable lay ecclesial ministry. 10
    11. 11. Who is a lay ecclesial minister?Who is a lay ecclesial minister?  Authorization of the hierarchy to serve publicly in the local Church  Leadership in a particular area of ministry  Close mutual collaboration with the pastoral ministry of bishops, priests, and deacons  Preparation and formation appropriate to the level of responsibilities that are assigned to them including; human, spiritual, pastoral, and theological dimensions 11 LEM
    12. 12. Evolution ofEvolution of CertificationCertification 12 3rd Decade: Movement into Certification 2010 Consultation 2011 Approval by Alliance members & USCCB/CCA 2012 Begin implementing certification 2nd Decade: Interorganizational Collaboration •1999 Common Competency Project •2003 National Certification Standards •2005 Co-Workers in the Vineyard of the Lord •Alliance becomes official entity 1st Decade: Establishing Standards From 1990 on, national ministry organizations begin developing certification standards
    13. 13. Structure of Revised StandardsStructure of Revised Standards Alignment with Co-WorkersAlignment with Co-Workers 5 Standards (2003) Personal & Spiritual Maturity Lay Ecclesial Ministry Identity Catholic Theology Pastoral Praxis Professional Practice 13 4 Standards (2011)4 Standards (2011) (to align with 4 Pillars of(to align with 4 Pillars of Formation fromFormation from Co-Co- WorkersWorkers):): HumanHuman SpiritualSpiritual IntellectualIntellectual PastoralPastoral
    14. 14. Standard One Human: Lay ecclesial ministers demonstrate the qualities of human maturity needed for fruitful ministry with the people of God. Standard Two Spiritual: Sharing in the common priesthood of all the baptized, a lay ecclesial minister demonstrates Christian spirituality as foundational to ministry, integrated in service with the people of God, and possessing a sacramental view of the world that recognizes the world can be a vessel of God’s presence and God’s transforming grace. Standard Three Intellectual: A lay ecclesial minister demonstrates understanding of the breadth of Catholic theological and pastoral studies as well as the intellectual skill to use that knowledge in ministry with God’s people from diverse populations and cultures. Standard Four Pastoral: A lay ecclesial minister demonstrates a range of leadership and pastoral skills needed for functioning effectively in ministry.
    15. 15. CULTURAL DIVERSITYCULTURAL DIVERSITY WITHINTHE STANDARDSWITHINTHE STANDARDS Core competencies reflect realities and expectations of ministry in diversity of cultural communities Indicators include examples of inter-cultural competence from diverse cultural contexts and settings Specialized competencies and distinct portfolio requirements for Pastoral 16
    16. 16. What does it meanWhat does it mean to be nationally certified?to be nationally certified? ((and, what it doesn’t mean!and, what it doesn’t mean!)) 
    17. 17. 18 Certification:Certification: The processThe process whereby a personwhereby a person demonstratesdemonstrates compliance withcompliance with standards forstandards for professionalprofessional competence.competence. AccreditationAccreditation The processThe process whereby a dulywhereby a duly constitutedconstituted accrediting bodyaccrediting body gives recognition togives recognition to education and /oreducation and /or serviceservice center/programscenter/programs which meetwhich meet establishedestablished standards.standards. Certificate:Certificate: A statement that aA statement that a program or courseprogram or course of studies hasof studies has been completedbeen completed throughthrough attendance,attendance, participation orparticipation or fulfillment offulfillment of requirements.requirements.
    18. 18. How does national certification affectHow does national certification affect my relationship with my Bishop?my relationship with my Bishop? Co-Workers in theVineyard of the Lord describes authorization as including: ◦ Acknowledgement of competence (certification) ◦ Appointment to position (commissioning) ◦ Announcement to the community 19
    19. 19. 20 Why should IWhy should I get certified?get certified?
    20. 20. Why NationalWhy National Certification?Certification? “Lay persons who devote themselves permanently or temporarily to some special service of the Church are obliged to acquire the appropriate formation which is required to fulfill their function properly and to carry it out conscientiously, zealously, and diligently.” Code of Canon Law, Canon 231
    21. 21. Why National Certification?Why National Certification? Lay ecclesial ministers’ functions of collaboration with the ordained require of lay ecclesial ministers a special level of professional competence and presence to the community. . . . For these reasons, their roles often require academic preparation, certification, credentialing, and a formation that integrates personal, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral dimensions.” Co-Workers in theVineyard of the Lord, p. 8
    22. 22. Benefits of National CertificationBenefits of National Certification IndividualIndividual DiocesanDiocesan NationalNational National credential &National credential & acknowledgementacknowledgement ofof competencecompetence Potential salary &Potential salary & hiring impacthiring impact Enhance confidenceEnhance confidence and credibilityand credibility Portable nationalPortable national credential endorsedcredential endorsed by USCCBby USCCB Easier, less costlyEasier, less costly option for offeringoption for offering certificationcertification Portable nationalPortable national credential can aidcredential can aid local hiringlocal hiring processesprocesses Tool for advocatingTool for advocating for lay ecclesialfor lay ecclesial ministersministers Together is betterTogether is better Establish nationalEstablish national standards ofstandards of excellenceexcellence Build credibility andBuild credibility and trust for LEMtrust for LEM Contribute to theContribute to the development of LEMdevelopment of LEM within the Churchwithin the Church 23
    23. 23. 24 Are you certifiable?
    24. 24. National Certification ProcessNational Certification Process Application for admission to the process Preparation of materials Submission of Documentation for review and decision www.lemcertification.org
    25. 25. National Certification ProcessNational Certification Process Pre-RequisitesPre-Requisites 1.Education in a field related to one’s specialized ministry (e.g. bachelor’s degree or equivalent); 2.Minimum of 3 years full time (6 years part time) pastoral ministry experience in that specialized ministry
    26. 26. The Application PacketThe Application Packet Membership in Partner Organization Baptismal Certificate – long form (Evidence of full communion with the Church) Three References (one from supervising pastor or equivalent and two from colleagues) History of educational background Ministerial autobiography (3-5 pages) (Arch)Diocesan verification of satisfaction of child protection and criminal background requirements Signed and dated Code of Ethics Application fee ($95)
    27. 27. Application Review ProcessApplication Review Process 28
    28. 28. Preparation of MaterialsPreparation of Materials Candidates may be assigned an advisor who will assist with the development of the portfolio
    29. 29. Preparation of MaterialsPreparation of Materials • Candidates pay candidacy fee ($165) which allows them one year to submit portfolio (after one year, a $100 annual candidacy fee applies) • Additional fee ($50) applies if portfolio is submitted in paper format rather than electronically • Begin compiling portfolio…
    30. 30. Why is a portfolio being used for certification? What will a certification portfolio include? LEM
    31. 31. 32 Types of Evidence within Certification Portfolio
    32. 32. Certification Portfolio: Documentation of Competence 1. Evidence of formal education and formation for ministry • Theological education • Specialized education and formation 2. Evidence of demonstrated competency in ministry in all four standards • Compile documentation • Create 1-3 page summary for each standard 3. Testimony / observational evidence • Pastor (or supervisor) • Peer or colleague • Subordinate (volunteer or staff) • For YML candidates, Diocesan Director 4. Self-assessment (form provided) including Ministerial Development Planning (form provided) 5. Integration Paper
    33. 33. Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison Evidence of Theological StudyEvidence of Theological Study PCLPCL DYMLDYML DYML/PJDYML/PJ HH YMLYML YML / PJHYML / PJH PreferablyPreferably MasterMaster’s’s degree;degree; equivalencyequivalency possiblepossible PreferablyPreferably MasterMaster’s degree;’s degree; equivalencyequivalency possiblepossible Total of 240 clock hoursTotal of 240 clock hours or 12 credits of theologicalor 12 credits of theological study in four (of 7) corestudy in four (of 7) core areas; Minimum 120 clockareas; Minimum 120 clock hours when applying withhours when applying with additional 120 clock hoursadditional 120 clock hours (remaining core areas)(remaining core areas) completed before 1completed before 1stst renewalrenewal 34
    34. 34. Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison Evidence of Specialized StudyEvidence of Specialized Study PCLPCL DYMLDYML YMLYML 120 Hours of120 Hours of training andtraining and formation information in catechesis,catechesis, RE, orRE, or formation. Anformation. An additional 90additional 90 hours byhours by recertification.recertification. Minimum 120Minimum 120 hours of YMhours of YM and/or PJHand/or PJH training &training & formationformation Minimum 90Minimum 90 hours of YMhours of YM and/or PJHand/or PJH training &training & formationformation PJH: Evidence of study, knowledgePJH: Evidence of study, knowledge and/or skills in: History of Hispanicand/or skills in: History of Hispanic ministry in US, USCCB documentsministry in US, USCCB documents on Hispanic ministry, etc.on Hispanic ministry, etc. 35
    35. 35. Portfolio Requirement ComparisonPortfolio Requirement Comparison Demonstration of CompetenceDemonstration of Competence PCLPCL DYML orDYML or DYML/PJHDYML/PJH YMLYML YML /YML / PJHPJH Evidence ofEvidence of successfulsuccessful leadership in aleadership in a catecheticalcatechetical context (e.g. jobcontext (e.g. job description,description, meeting outlines,meeting outlines, programprogram brochures.brochures. Overview of 3 monthOverview of 3 month period in ministry;period in ministry; evidence of twoevidence of two diocesan programs ordiocesan programs or projects, one for youth,projects, one for youth, one for adultsone for adults Overview ofOverview of 3 month3 month period inperiod in ministry;ministry; evidence ofevidence of twotwo programs orprograms or projects thatprojects that illustrateillustrate understandiunderstandi ng ofng of comprehenscomprehens ive youthive youth Overview of 3Overview of 3 month periodmonth period in ministry;in ministry; evidence ofevidence of two programstwo programs or projects,or projects, one forone for jóvenesjóvenes, one, one forfor jóvenesjóvenes lidereslideres Outline of sampleOutline of sample presentation thatpresentation that explains the vision andexplains the vision and implementation ofimplementation of Catholic youth ministryCatholic youth ministry and/or PJHand/or PJH 36
    36. 36. Integration Paper 11-15 pages that includes: • Description of a concrete problem or issue in ministry (1-2 pages) • Exposition of material from Scripture, Church teaching, theology, or other pertinent areas of study that address this problem/issue (5-6 pages) • Application of theological/intellectual insights and a resolution of the issue that reflects sound practice (3-4 pages) • Reflection on how one’s formation helped deal with the issue and challenge one to further growth (2-3 pages)
    37. 37. Submission and ReviewSubmission and Review of Documentationof Documentation PCRC=Partner Certification Review Committee (members from partner organization NCRC=National Certification Review Committee (consisting of the PCRC Chairs from each organization) AC=Alliance Commission (Consisting of the Executive Directors and Chair Certification Committee from each organization
    38. 38. Submission and ReviewSubmission and Review of Documentationof Documentation All portfolio materials are compiled and submitted online on a secure site. PCRC receives and reviews portfolio, and makes recommendation for approval based on Satisfactory documentation of competence relative to approved standards PCRC forwards portfolio to the NCRC for approval; after their review forward to AC AC renders final decision regarding certification in the name of the Alliance
    39. 39. Congrats you are nationally certified as andCongrats you are nationally certified as and LEM in your specific role!LEM in your specific role! 40 Certified LEM
    40. 40. To summarize…To summarize… 1. Applicant applies to the Alliance Membership Organization that is certifying the role for which you seek certification. 2. The portfolio is developed with an advisor’s assistance. 3. The portfolio is submitted to an organization’s PCRC. 4. Upon PCRC approval, the portfolio and the recommendation to approve are sent to the NCRC. 5. Upon NCRC approval, the recommendation to approve goes to the AC for final decision. 6. Upon AC decision the candidate becomes nationally certified in their role for 7 years and receives certificate noting this distinction
    41. 41. Our Shared Work...Our Shared Work... Building a “culture of competence” in lay ecclesial ministry by advocating for professional, competent, faithful ministry to the people of God! 42
    42. 42. What can you do to be a part of thisWhat can you do to be a part of this national movement towards anational movement towards a culture of competenceculture of competence?? Use the standards to develop curriculum for training and formation for volunteers. Use standards to articulate your ministerial role (job description, performance review, etc. ) Enter the certification process! Promote certification to others! 43
    43. 43. To learn more about and applyTo learn more about and apply for national certificationfor national certification ◦ Available for download from www.lemcertification.org  Standards  Indicators  Details about the Certification Process ◦ Applications & portfolios to be submitted online through this web site ◦ Application deadline March 1st and October 1st 44
    44. 44. Once upon a time…..Once upon a time….. 45
    45. 45. What is one thing from thisWhat is one thing from this workshop that you want toworkshop that you want to share with your pastor orshare with your pastor or another lay ecclesial ministeranother lay ecclesial minister about national certification?about national certification?
    46. 46. 47 Concluding PrayerConcluding Prayer by Joseph Cardinal Bernardinby Joseph Cardinal Bernardin O Lord of the harvest, work out your will in us, that we might prepare others to be laborers for your harvest. Transform us ever more completely into the image of your Son, that we might call others to ministry as He called, teach them as he taught, and form them as He did. We make this prayer in your most holy name. Amen.
    47. 47. Thanks for participating in this workshop! Follow me onTwitter: @charmccor Website/Blog: www.ministrytrainingsource.org Email: charlotte@ministrytrainingsource.org 48
    48. 48. Presentation CreditsPresentation Credits The following persons or groups have contributed to this slide show in some way: Kathy Goller, Sean Reynolds and other members from the National Federation of CatholicYouth Ministry Commission. Sr.Angela Gannon, Mike McMahon, and Rita Thiron, members from the Alliance PCRC Training committee. Charlotte McCorquodale with Ministry Training Source who serves also as a member of the two above groups (Commission and Training Committee.) PLEASE DO NOT SHARE THIS PRESENTATION ELECTRONICALLY. 49
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