Networked Journalism: society & ownership
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Networked Journalism: society & ownership

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This was my talk about how social trends change journalism as much as technology - it also looked at the idea of who 'owns' the news. ...

This was my talk about how social trends change journalism as much as technology - it also looked at the idea of who 'owns' the news.
You can download video of the talk here http://vimeo.com/channels/emjo/49850941
You can read the text for the talk here:
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/polis/2012/09/17/society-ownership-and-networked-journalism-polis-at-the-picnic-in-amsterdam/

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  •  I want to start by saying that yes, everybody and every Company is now a media company. We all create and consume media.Media is now environmental.I am going to argue that to understand this new context for organisations we need to understand the ethics of the social, political and editorial make up of communications in this environment.It doesn’t matter if you are retail or B2B – everyone is now part of the network.You can continue to think tactically about communications, but for serious planning, you also need to think strategically.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.
  • Here’s a family:What are they looking at? [ASK THE AUDIENCE]What are they doing with it?Why are they doing it?Is it a good or bad thing that they are all looking at a screen instead of talking to each other?The technology allows them to do this, but what motivates them and how do they use it?How does it change them as individuals and as family – of three generations in this case.These are ethical questionsWhat shapes the answers is not the technology – it will be other forces or factors – The granny is there because of increased longevityThe small child understands because she is taught media in schoolsThe others family live in a different country because of globalisation so they use this technology to keep in touchHow they use this technology is based on their own values of identity, personality and their own history.So social trends plus personal ethics = media trends.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.
  •  I want to start by saying that yes, everybody and every Company is now a media company. We all create and consume media.Media is now environmental.I am going to argue that to understand this new context for organisations we need to understand the ethics of the social, political and editorial make up of communications in this environment.It doesn’t matter if you are retail or B2B – everyone is now part of the network.You can continue to think tactically about communications, but for serious planning, you also need to think strategically.
  • Every organisation is now a media company: businesses - government - charities - schools - the NHS. All produce internal communications such as email.All produce external communications such as website, press releases, video channels etcBut that distinction doesn’t hold too well as we now have mixed or networked communications that are simultaneously: inside/out side or personal/professional communications: Twitter, Facebook, etcMost of all you now operate in a media world where anyone can talk about anything, anytime – including about you or your business. A natural urge is to either try to do everything or conversely, to withdraw - at the very least, to seek to control. There is nothing obligatory, natural, or inevitable about this new media environment. If it is an eco-system, it is entirely artificial. Think national park rather than jungle. So what I want to stress is that everyone has choices: how you communicate, your tactics, your strategy. These choices will ultimately be driven not by the technology but by the real goals of your organisations: profit, power, advocacy, charity, entertainment - whatever.  But whatever the goals you need to consider the Ethics. By ethics I mean choices that you make based on your values and responding to other people’s values.

Transcript

  • 1. Networked Journalism:society & ownershipCharlie BeckettPOLIS, London School of EconomicsAmsterdam Picnic September 2012E: c.h.beckett@lse.ac.ukT: @charliebeckettBlog: www.charliebeckett.org
  • 2. Networked Journalist + Public Participation + New technologies = Better Journalism
  • 3. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss
  • 4. Meet the new media magnates
  • 5. Welcome to the age ofuncertainty and complexity
  • 6. What will you do?•Brand•Reputation•Skills•Added value•Relationship
  • 7. Networked Journalism:society & ownershipCharlie BeckettPOLIS, London School of EconomicsAmsterdam Picnic September 2012E: c.h.beckett@lse.ac.ukT: @charliebeckettBlog: www.charliebeckett.org