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Gamification in the Classroom                Pointers for Training Professionals                 Charles Palmer           ...
Gamificationthe concept of applying game-design thinking tonon-game applications to make them more funand engaging
Some non-classroom examples…
Examples…
EducationalExamples…
EducationalExamples…
Some facts…• 2011 Gartner Research Report it is  estimated that by 2015, more than 50% of  organizations that manage innov...
Gamification               Loyalty Programs                      (redemption)  Behavioral                                 ...
Player Types                                                                                                              ...
Achievers          47        Explorers          67       SocializersESAK                     Player Types          53     ...
Player Types                                                                                                              ...
Gamification Loop                        Challenges      status                           Game Play                 Point ...
But wait…• Creating these types of games is hard work (so what else is new)• Just adding points and badges doesn’t make so...
“Do people not do something because they are  not able to? – then increase ease of use.Do people not do it because they ha...
Gamification Loop                        Challenges      status                           Game Play                 Point ...
Game Play Mechanics Community                  Discovery                  EPIC Meaning   Free LunchCollaboration  Infinite...
Game Play Mechanics CommunityCollaboration                  Discovery      Behavior    EPIC Meaning    Free Lunch  Infinit...
More examples…
Six rules…1. Understand what constitutes a “win” for the   player and organization2. Expose the player’s intrinsic motivat...
Six rules…4. Develop scalable, meaningful intrinsic and   extrinsic rewards5. Use on of the leading platform vendors to   ...
“In some ways it is a fad – adding points      and badges in tacky ways, looking at  ‘gamification’ as an easy way to make...
Resources• Vendors  – Bunchball, Badgeville, BigDoor, Rypple, DueProps,    SCVNGR, CrowdTwist
Resources•   PearlTrees - http://bit.ly/IhdQod•   Jesse Schell – The Pleasure Revolution http://bit.ly/J15rbp•   Gabe Zimm...
Bringing Gamification into your Training
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Bringing Gamification into your Training

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  • What I do at the UNIVERSITYOur gamification/ARG projects
  • Many of you, probably most of you, have heard the term. But I thought we should start off with a common definition.Gamification is the process of applying game-design principles and thinking to non-game activities to make them more fun and engaging.Examples of gamification span applications, websites, and physical activitiesIn most instances the purpose is to motivate the player to take an action. We’re seeing gamified products in every industry; health care, consumer goods, publishing, and education.Let’s look at some examples
  • Foursquare:We’ll talk about this laterKahn Academy - http://www.khanacademy.org/aboutKhan academy is a video library service for K-12 math, science, and physics topics. Every time you work on a problem or watch a video, your actions are logged. the Khan Academy remembers what you've learned and where you're spending your time. They keep all of this data private but expose powerful statistics to each user and their coaches. Users earn badges and points for learning. The more you challenge yourself, the more bragging rights you'll get.Nike+ - http://nikerunning.nike.com/nikeos/p/nikeplus/en_US/plus/?1328992102767/#//dashboard/A number of excersie related gamification products are on the market. The Nike+ system includes a device which tracks your health data which running. Steps, heart rate, calories burned, distance travelled, speed, and time. Data points can be attached to challenges to compete against your friends.Fun Theory66% more people took the stairs22% reduction in speed
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lXh2n0aPywFun Theory66% more people took the stairs22% reduction in speed
  • Foursquare:Using a mobile device, foursquare let’s users “check-in” at locations. Through this process players are given challenges; visit more locations, connect with friends, unlock rewards…When completing tasks players earn badges, mayorships, and retail discounts.
  • Kahn Academy - http://www.khanacademy.org/aboutKhan academy is a video library service for K-12 math, science, and physics topics. Every time you work on a problem or watch a video, your actions are logged. the Khan Academy remembers what you've learned and where you're spending your time. They keep all of this data private but expose powerful statistics to each user and their coaches. Users earn badges and points for learning. The more you challenge yourself, the more bragging rights you'll get.
  • PAUSE FOR QUESTIONSLoyalty program, getting people to make a choice in your favor when all competing choices are equal1900 sugar merchants, buy 10 lbs get one more free1930 S&H green stamp programs, save enough and redeem for stuff (first virtual currency, and was variable to the end-user)1981 American Airlines, drives loyalty using status2005 no redemption, you can’t convert farmville credits to cash.Farmville no real-world redemptionBehavioral economics, “word of mouth” marketing – no one knows how it really works. But in order for me to tell you how much I like a product I need to share my experience with you. And sell you on the product, or actually sell you on the reliability of the manufactoruer (elavating my personal status).In the modern era, loyalty choices are now open to the public, via online networks and social sharing sites. There is now a process for the behavior social economics, it’s more structured because decision are made public. So users can freely share their impressions (both positivley and negatively) of your brand in a semi-open forum. And through this relationship a user’s personal status elevated, It’s also interesting to note that successful redemption programs reward players with status, not cash. Look at reality TV shows, the players are offered cash, but they are really playing for attention and status. Top Chef, Cupcake Wars, … not enough to start a business, but winning gains status which can be used to build revenue around a brand.
  • Researcher,RichardBartle, created a test of Gamer Psychology. This device is a series of questions and a scoring formula that classifies players of multiplayer online games (including MUDs and MMORPGs) into categories based on their gaming preferences. The result of the Bartle Test is the "Bartle Quotient", which is calculated based on the answers to a series of 30 random questions in the test, and totals 200% across all categories, with no single category exceeding 100%. For example, a person may score "100% Killer, 50% Socializer, 40% Achiever, 10% Explorer," which indicates a player who prefers fighting other players relative to any other area of interest. Scores are typically abbreviated by the first letter of each category, in order of the quotient. In the previous example, this result would be described as a "KSAE" result.[2]
  • Researcher,RichardBartle, created a test of Gamer Psychology. This device is a series of questions and a scoring formula that classifies players of multiplayer online games (including MUDs and MMORPGs) into categories based on their gaming preferences. The result of the Bartle Test is the "Bartle Quotient", which is calculated based on the answers to a series of 30 random questions in the test, and totals 200% across all categories, with no single category exceeding 100%. For example, a person may score "100% Killer, 50% Socializer, 40% Achiever, 10% Explorer," which indicates a player who prefers fighting other players relative to any other area of interest. Scores are typically abbreviated by the first letter of each category, in order of the quotient. In the previous example, this result would be described as a "KSAE" result.[2]
  • Researcher,RichardBartle, created a test of Gamer Psychology. This device is a series of questions and a scoring formula that classifies players of multiplayer online games (including MUDs and MMORPGs) into categories based on their gaming preferences. The result of the Bartle Test is the "Bartle Quotient", which is calculated based on the answers to a series of 30 random questions in the test, and totals 200% across all categories, with no single category exceeding 100%. For example, a person may score "100% Killer, 50% Socializer, 40% Achiever, 10% Explorer," which indicates a player who prefers fighting other players relative to any other area of interest. Scores are typically abbreviated by the first letter of each category, in order of the quotient. In the previous example, this result would be described as a "KSAE" result.[2]
  • This is the process for creating desired behaviors within users. It all centers around a point system that can be used to motivate a user. Around the point system we have game mechanics which can be used to engage users in the loop. Point systems are important. We see them all the time; money is a point system. But I can’t really tell you how much money I made last year, its just rude. Instead I buy a lot of things to show how much money I have, again elavating my status. Likewise we do the same thing in games. I have a weekly score in Foursquare, and I’ve also collected badges, friends, and certificated in other systems.So this loop describes the process a user needs to perform to stay motivated. And it starts with a challenge, the user must checked-in, watch a video, completed an assessment, or whatever each situation should have a win conditionMy success is broadcast to the community (via leaderboards or various types, personal badges, and social network updates)These three things all lead to an increase in my status.And in some systems it’s not about the points (well, it’s not the publicly exposed point value), but instead it’s the signalling of the points (size of kingdom, number of crops, amount of acquired loot)
  • As humans we naturally explore given choices if we believe it is worth the effort. Motivate players with appropriate rewards and then teach them to do what you want.Layer the experience with challenges that are new, with tasks that take time to mature. In the Foursquare example no task or challenge is dependent upon completing one another. I can be working on my “long term” Warhol badge (checking in at your 10th art museums) and a “one shot” School Night badge (checking-in after 3a on a school night) at the same time.
  • Also to consider…
  • This is the process for creating desired behaviors within users. It all centers around a point system that can be used to motivate a user. Around the point system we have game mechanics which can be used to engage users in the loop. Point systems are important. We see them all the time; money is a point system. But I can’t really tell you how much money I made last year, its just rude. Instead I buy a lot of things to show how much money I have, again elavating my status. Likewise we do the same thing in games. I have a weekly score in Foursquare, and I’ve also collected badges, friends, and certificated in other systems.So this loop describes the process a user needs to perform to stay motivated. And it starts with a challenge, the user must checked-in, watch a video, completed an assessment, or whatever each situation should have a win conditionMy success is broadcast to the community (via leaderboards or various types, personal badges, and social network updates)These three things all lead to an increase in my status.And in some systems it’s not about the points (well, it’s not the publicly exposed point value), but instead it’s the signalling of the points (size of kingdom, number of crops, amount of acquired loot)
  • Achievements are a virtual or physical representation of having accomplished something. Appointment Dynamics are game dynamics in which at a predetermined times/place a user must log-in or participate in game, for positive effect. Behavioral Momentum is the tendency of players to keep doing what they have been doing. BLISS The idea that playing in a game makes you happier working hard, than you would be relaxing. Cascading - The theory that information should be released in the minimum possible snippets to gain the appropriate level of understanding at each point during The game dynamic wherein an entire community is rallied to work together to solve a riddle, a problem or a challenge. Immensely viral and very fun.Also called Exploration, players love to discover something, to be surprised. This also can be seen in the Game Feature, Discovery. Discovery EPIC Players will be highly motivated if they believe they are working to achieve something great, something awe-inspiring, something bigger than themselveFREE LUNCH A dynamic in which a player feels that they are getting something for free due to someone else having done work. It’s critical that work is perceivedLoss Aversion is a game mechanic that influences user behavior not by reward, but by not instituting punishment.Virality A game element that requires multiple people to play (or that can be played better with multiple people)
  • DevHubGamifying the website development process. Most people don’t complete a website to their liking. This site/product motivated you to keep up with the task.Saw 50% increase in blog activity, 300% increase in gamified-site activities.Zombie:In zombie run you are Runner #5 and hundreds of survivors are counting on you.
  • Identify the key metrics, be casreful not to over promiseWhat are the players hopes fears and anxieties. By understanding the player as a whole, we can design an emotional context around the experienceOur player is a playful individual.
  • Gamification works to engage and motivate users. But it is not a magic elixer.
  • Transcript of "Bringing Gamification into your Training"

    1. 1. Gamification in the Classroom Pointers for Training Professionals Charles Palmer Harrisburg University
    2. 2. Gamificationthe concept of applying game-design thinking tonon-game applications to make them more funand engaging
    3. 3. Some non-classroom examples…
    4. 4. Examples…
    5. 5. EducationalExamples…
    6. 6. EducationalExamples…
    7. 7. Some facts…• 2011 Gartner Research Report it is estimated that by 2015, more than 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will gamify those processes.• The trend has been picking up major Al Gore talks about how "Games are the new normal" and the power of momentum over the last year and has Gamification at the 2011 Games for Change Festival. gained support from industry heavy weights such as Bing Gordon, Al Gore, J.P. Rangaswami, Chief Scientist of Salesforce.com, and many more.
    8. 8. Gamification Loyalty Programs (redemption) Behavioral Game Design Economics (engagement)(status/reputation)
    9. 9. Player Types KillersAchievers Explorers Socializers •prefer to gain •players who prefer •gain the most •thrive on "points," levels, discovering areas, enjoyment by competition with equipment and creating maps and interacting with other players, and other concrete learning about other players, and prefer fighting them measurements hidden places on some occasions, to scripted computer-controlled computer-controlled •go to great lengths •feel restricted when characters with opponents to achieve rewards expected to move on personality that confer them in a certain time little or no gameplay frame, as that does •The game is merely benefit simply for not allow them to a tool they use to the prestige of look around at their meet others in-game having it. own pace. or outside of it •find joy in discovering an unknown glitch or a hidden easter egg.
    10. 10. Achievers 47 Explorers 67 SocializersESAK Player Types 53 Killers 33
    11. 11. Player Types KillersAchievers Explorers Socializers •prefer to gain •players who prefer •gain the most •thrive on "points," levels, discovering areas, enjoyment by competition with equipment and creating maps and interacting with other players, and other concrete learning about other players, and prefer fighting them measurements hidden places on some occasions, to scripted computer-controlled computer-controlled •go to great lengths •feel restricted when characters with opponents to achieve rewards expected to move on personality that confer them in a certain time little or no gameplay frame, as that does •The game is merely benefit simply for not allow them to a tool they use to the prestige of look around at their meet others in-game having it. own pace. or outside of it •find joy in discovering an unknown glitch or a hidden easter egg.
    12. 12. Gamification Loop Challenges status Game Play Point system Social Win/Lossnetworking conditions badges leaderboards
    13. 13. But wait…• Creating these types of games is hard work (so what else is new)• Just adding points and badges doesn’t make something fun and an improperly balanced reward system will negatively effect the behavior you are trying to address.• The true magic happens when a player succeed in a challenge which Too frustrating seemed (or was) daunting and beyond their skill level.• Players are motivated by different Too easy things. So we have to consider different experiences for varying player types*
    14. 14. “Do people not do something because they are not able to? – then increase ease of use.Do people not do it because they have no free time? – then work on that. Only if motivation is the issue cangamificaion be a [legitimate] way [of influencing behaviour” - Sebastian Deterding, research
    15. 15. Gamification Loop Challenges status Game Play Point system Social Win/Lossnetworking conditions badges leaderboards
    16. 16. Game Play Mechanics Community Discovery EPIC Meaning Free LunchCollaboration Infinite Loss Aversion Lottery Momentum Ownership Gameplay Blissful UrgentAppointments Status Virality Productivity Optimism Cascading Combos Achievements Levels Information Reward Countdown Quests Points Schedules
    17. 17. Game Play Mechanics CommunityCollaboration Discovery Behavior EPIC Meaning Free Lunch Infinite Loss Aversion Lottery Momentum Ownership Gameplay Blissful UrgentAppointments Status Virality Productivity Optimism Cascading Feedback Information Combos Achievements Levels Reward Countdown Quests Schedules Points Progression
    18. 18. More examples…
    19. 19. Six rules…1. Understand what constitutes a “win” for the player and organization2. Expose the player’s intrinsic motivation and progress to mastery3. Design for the emotional human, not the rational human
    20. 20. Six rules…4. Develop scalable, meaningful intrinsic and extrinsic rewards5. Use on of the leading platform vendors to scale your project6. Most interactions are boring, make everything a little more fun
    21. 21. “In some ways it is a fad – adding points and badges in tacky ways, looking at ‘gamification’ as an easy way to make boring things seem interesting – that is a fad. However, the idea of designing businessprocesses so that those who engage in them findthem more intrinsically rewarding – that is a long term trend.” - Jesse Schell, CEO Schell Games
    22. 22. Resources• Vendors – Bunchball, Badgeville, BigDoor, Rypple, DueProps, SCVNGR, CrowdTwist
    23. 23. Resources• PearlTrees - http://bit.ly/IhdQod• Jesse Schell – The Pleasure Revolution http://bit.ly/J15rbp• Gabe Zimmerman - http://bit.ly/IUiWFZ• Gamification.org/wiki• Concept of “Flow” by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - bit.ly/conceptofflow
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