Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Definitions And Histories Of Comics
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Definitions And Histories Of Comics

703

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
703
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Ways of defining comics:
    • Formalist: through analysis of comics’ various formal components, e.g., the panel, the panel sequence, the word balloon
    • Sociocultural: through analysis of historical relations (e.g., comic strips in relation to newspapers, comics in relation to animation), social functions (comics as Pop culture), marketing & reception (e.g., who reads them?)
    • As Delany argues, comics may
    • be seen as “social objects”
  • 2. Some definitions may combine formalist & sociocultural features:
    • Waugh calls for not only image sequencing and word balloons but also recognizable continuing characters that can be branded & merchandised
    • Kunzle calls for image sequencing and the dominance of image over text, but also topical content, “a popular idiom” and mass reproduction for popular consumption
  • 3. Specific definitions shape (even enable) specific histories:
    • By Waugh’s definition, comics originate in the commercial comic strips of the late 19 th to early 20 th century
    • By Kunzle’s, comics originate in the 15 th century with mass reproduction (e.g., broadsheets)
    • By McCloud’s, comics are as old as narrative art, perhaps as old as art itself
  • 4. Different ways of defining comics:
    • Formalist / aesthetic: through analysis of comics’ various formal components, e.g., the panel, the panel sequence, the word balloon
    • Sociocultural: historical, sociological, ideological, economic, etc.
  • 5. Competing histories of comics:
    • The Americanist: locates the origins of comics in the American comic strips of the 1880s-1890s, particularly in the rise of popular continuing characters (Outcault’s “Yellow Kid” in 1895)
    • Some call this view
    • the “ Yellow Kid thesis”
  • 6. Competing histories of comics:
    • The T ö pfferian: locates the origins of comics in the comic albums of Swiss author-artist Rodolphe T ö pffer (c. 1820s to 1840s), e.g., “Histoire de Mr. Vieux-Bois” (1839), trans. as “The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck”
    • This more Eurocentric view has been adopted by many scholars, including, increasingly, many Americans
  • 7. The dawn of the weekly (later daily) American comic strip:
    • WHERE: New York City in the 1890s, multiethnic metropolis, crucible of modern America, home to many immigrants and first-generation Americans and site of fierce economic competition among newspaper publishers
    • HOW: By pioneering cartoonists such as R. F. Outcault, Rudolph Dirks, Fred Opper, James Swinnerton, George Herriman, Winsor McCay, and George Herriman

×