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Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
Mass media messages and behavioral effects
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Mass media messages and behavioral effects

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  • With today's technology in media we deal with mass communications. In dealing with the mass communications we see them in printing, chemical, electronic and digital technological transitions. There are many examples that fall under these categories, a few could be magazines, photography, radio and internet. Along with this comes influence of digital technology.
  • Mass media outlets serve three main purposes; to entertain, inform, and persuade. (The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). Before mass media existed people would gather around fires or in and tell stories and this was how messages would spread from village to village. Often times these gatherings would include other forms of entertainment such as jugglers, singing, or musicians. Radio and television are a more common source for entertainment, information, and persuasion. “An extensive Ball State University study found that we spend 68.8 percent of our waking hours with the media, much of it while doing something else”(The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). Entertainment on television can be found on basic network channels or cable channels. Where at one time television didn’t exist, now we are able to record, stop, and even rewind live television. Using radio or television news channels are utilized by the public to stay up to date with current events both locally and around the globe. In the marketing field advertising companies target choice audiences for their products by attempting to persuade the public to purchase their product. Commercials are broadcast on both television and radio programming. Politics also play into these media sources. Due to the vast audience television and radio can reach many politicians will produce campaign commercials in effort to gain more supports through mass media messages.
  • The primary role of recording and motion pictures has always been to entertain the masses. Eighty four percent of the recording industry consist of four different recording labels known as the big four. The recording labels are responsible for bringing music to the mass audiences. (The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). The Federal Communications Commission enforces periodic renewal of licenses and the licenses can be revoked at anytime, so radio networks make an effort to abide by the FCC regulations. “The FCC has been explicit about obnoxious lyrics. In 1971 the commission said that stations have a responsibility to know “the content of the lyrics.” (The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). “Hollywood is dominated by six movie studios, all engaged in both producing and distributing movies.” (The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). The six major studios are; Paramount, Disney, Columbia, 20th Century Fox, Universal and Warner. Movies were released to exhibition houses or theaters for public viewing and in 1946 ticket sales were 90 million per week. The business of theater has been hit or miss since then. With public broadcast television in the 1950’s theater attendance began to decline. Present day many of the same films that are being shown in the theaters can also be purchased from home or online.
  • One of the first mass uses of the Internet was e-mail, a shortened form of the term electronic mail. The history of e-mail goes back to 1969 when the U.S. military created a computer network, called ARPAnet, which stood for Advanced Research Projects Agency Network. In the 1990’s the internet became household accessible and webpages began to emerge as the digital age began to evolve further. One of the largest advantages of the internet for mass media communication is the speed and access available to the public. With resources such as Youtube, Napster, and Amazon music movies and other forms of entertainment are available at the click of a mouse. As an information resource the internet has virtually made encyclopedias obsolete, search engines such as Google have replaced the need for in body library research. Gaming or playing video games is another current digital media frenzy. “The time enthusiasts spend with video games is catching up with television. Players of Madden NFL 2004 spend an estimated average of 100 hours a year on the game.” (The Media of Mass Communication, 2011). Controversy over the influence of prolonged gaming and the impact of the hidden messages in video games continues to be a popular debate. Owning a cell phone is as common as owning a television these days, and the newest role for cell phones is texting. Four of five mobile-phone users in the United States use texting. Texting is a form of email that is sent from cell phone to cell phone. Normally these are short messages. News channels, school districts, radio stations, advertising companies, and many others are taking advantage of this form of media to deliver quick and instant messages to the mass public.
  • Machinery is required for technology advancements. Great innovations have made mass media communication possible for the last 550 years. Printing press in 1440, allowed for handwritten books to be published in mass productions. Newspapers became a way for people to get their news, advertisements, business information, political and government reforms, social events and obituaries for almost 160 years. Chemical technology allowed for processing of photographs to add visual impact to journalistic articles. Electronic technology made radio available almost in every household by the 1930s. In the 1950’s television entered the mass media communication through invisible technology. The digital explosion of the internet which started as a military mode of communication, is now a household staple for mass communication from shopping, news, information, books, music and has replaced many of the old print methods of mass communication (Vivian, 2011).
  • Desktops, laptops, phones have all influenced our daily lives and the Internet makes this all possible. Some researchers and scientist believe this form of mass communications is not all good of an influence. We have become media junkies. Video games are now more popular entertainment than radio and contain a certain amount of violence which as humans we seem to enjoy in vast amounts of time. Social Networks have taken the place of meeting people at a local bars. Twitter allows people to follow your daily routines. U Tube has made “Candid Camera” producers out of everyone with a cell phone. Wikipedia is a source of information for any topic without having to hunt for a dusty dictionary or encyclopedia. Shopping and banking can be done with a click of an enter key. Digital technology has its positives as well as its negatives. How often do we have any interpersonal communication? How vigilant have we become that we are afraid of the outdoors? Has digital technology made us fat? Has media advertising saturated our minds. Many believe online domination is an abomination.
  • News is a report of a change that journalist believe is worthy of capturing our attention (Vivian, 2011). The stories are objective and accurate, traditionally. Bloggers, have now entered as quasi journalistic field and the influence reaches a great number of people with their biased stories and propaganda. Inaccuracies cannot be contained. Many blame the violence in video games, movies and television on real life replicated violence. If it is not shown, would we have these tendencies. Many research studies have proven this a fact and many have not. The courts have yet to agree with the concept as a method of defense. Other theories suggest that we have become cathartic with over saturated violence media and have been made afraid of the dark and believe our world to be more violent than it truly is. Advertisers rely on mass communication to manipulate our minds to purchase their product.
  • In conclusion we have seen how the media deals with mass communication and media violence. We have had the chance to go over different categories and see the different examples of technological transitions. With this we have found out just how violent media today is, whether it be televised or in newspapers or even video game every where we look we see the violence.
  • ReferencesAnderson, C. A. (2011). Violent Video Games and Other Media Violence (Part I). Pediatrics for Parents, 27(1/2), 28. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.Boxer, P., Rowell Huesmann, L. L., Bushman, B., O’Brien, M., & Moceri, D. (2009). The Role of Violent Media Preference in Cumulative Developmental Risk for Violence and General Aggression. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 38(3), 417-428. doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9335-2Browne, K. D., & Hamilton-Giachritsis, C. (2005). The influence of violent media on children and adolescents: a public-health approach. The Lancet, 365(9460), para.702-710. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com/socialsciences/docview/199017060/abstract/12FA92E82307584841D/4?accountid=35812 Chatfield, J. E. (2002). Influence of media violence on children. American Family Physician, 65(4), para.735-742. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com/docview/234349717/12FA93D0EAA552DEA50/2?accountid=35812Krahé, B., Möller, I., Huesmann, L., Kirwil, L., Felber, J., & Berger, A. (2011). Desensitization to media violence: Links with habitual media violence exposure, aggressive cognitions, and aggressive behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(4), 630-646. doi:10.1037/a0021711Muscari, M. (2002). Media Violence: Advice for Parents. Pediatric Nursing, 28(6), 585. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.Vivian, J. (2011). The Media of Mass Communication (10th ed.). Allyn & Bacon., Page 5&6, 117 &118, 255
  • Transcript

    • 1. Mass Media Messages<br />Behavioral Effects<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />Learning Team C<br />University of Phoenix<br />Com/225<br />06/13/2011<br />Damiso A. Josey<br />
    • 2. Overview<br />Introduction to Mass Media Messages<br />Historical & Contemporary Roles - Radio & Television<br />Historical & Contemporary Roles - Recording & Motion Pictures<br />Historical & Contemporary Roles - Digital <br />Technological Transitions - Mass Communications<br />Influence of Digital Technology<br />Media and Society<br />Conclusion<br />References<br />2<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />
    • 3. How do we see mass communication in today’s world<br />Printing - magazines<br />Chemical - Photography<br />Electronic - Radio<br />Digital technology – Internet<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />3<br />Advertisements<br />Advertisements<br />Advertisements<br />
    • 4. Historical & Contemporary Roles <br />Radio & Television<br />4<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />
    • 5. 5<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />Historical & Contemporary Roles <br />Recording & Motion Pictures<br />
    • 6. 6<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />Historical & Contemporary Roles <br />Digital Media<br />Internet<br />Gaming<br />Texting<br />
    • 7. Technological Transitions Mass Communications<br />Printing<br />Magazines<br />Newspapers<br />Books<br />Chemical<br /> Photography<br />Movies<br />Electronic<br />Radio<br />Sound Recording<br />Television<br />Digital<br /> Internet<br />7<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />
    • 8. Influence of Digital Technology<br /> Video Games<br /> Blogs<br /> Social Networks<br /> Twitter<br /> U Tube<br /> Auction Sites<br /> Wikipedia<br /> Movies<br /> Advertisement<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />8<br />
    • 9. Media and Society<br /> Mass Media Message and Ethical Influence<br />Message Form<br />Media Violence<br />Behavioral Effects<br />Propaganda<br />Objectivity<br />Accuracy<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />9<br />
    • 10. Conclusion<br />10<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />Mass Communication and media violence in many ways<br /><ul><li>Good news – Bad news
    • 11. Non violent – Violent
    • 12. Fiction – Non fiction
    • 13. Visible – word of mouth</li></li></ul><li>References<br />11<br />Mass Media Messages: Behavioral Effects<br />Anderson, C. A. (2011). Violent Video Games and Other Media Violence (Part I). Pediatrics for Parents, 27(1/2), 28. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Boxer, P., Rowell Huesmann, L. L., Bushman, B., O’Brien, M., & Moceri, D. (2009). The Role of Violent Media Preference in Cumulative Developmental Risk for Violence and General Aggression. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 38(3), 417-428. doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9335-2<br />Browne, K. D., & Hamilton-Giachritsis, C. (2005). The influence of violent media on children and adolescents: a public-health approach. The Lancet, 365(9460), para.702-710. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com/socialsciences/docview/199017060/abstract/12FA92E8230 7584841D/4?accountid=35812 <br />Chatfield, J. E. (2002). Influence of media violence on children. American Family Physician, 65(4), para.735-742. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.apollolibrary.com/docview/234349717/12FA93D0EAA552DEA50/2?accounti d=35812<br />Krahé, B., Möller, I., Huesmann, L., Kirwil, L., Felber, J., & Berger, A. (2011). Desensitization to media violence: Links with habitual media violence exposure, aggressive cognitions, and aggressive behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100(4), 630-646. doi:10.1037/a0021711<br />Muscari, M. (2002). Media Violence: Advice for Parents. Pediatric Nursing, 28(6), 585. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Vivian, J. (2011). The Media of Mass Communication (10th ed.). Allyn & Bacon., Page 5&6, 117 &118, 255<br />

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