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  • 1. Western University Teaching Methodology Department of English Part II Chapter 08 Assessing Reading Presented by: Mr. Leang Channy Lecturer: Mr. Nourn Vanna Miss Tep Sonimul Page 1 Chapter 8 (Part II, from page 201 to 215) Assessing Reading I. Matching column A to B. (p.201-215) A B a. Summarizing b. Skimming c. Ordering Tasks d. Scanning e. Cloze-elide procedure f. C-test g. Fixed-ratio deletion h. Cloze i. Rational deletion j. Short-Answer Tasks k. The purpose of scanning l. Placement purpose m. Multiple-choice items n. Editing o. Responding 1. The ability to fill in gaps in an incomplete image and supply omitted details. (p.201) 2. The seventh word is deleted. (p. 202) 3. The word is removed some parts and the test-taker must complete it correctly. (p.203) 4. A test of reading speed and not of proofreading skill, as its proponents asserted. (p.204) 5. Read to find relevant information in a text. (p.209) 6. An assessment of overall global understanding of a story and of the cohesive devices that signal the order of events or ideas. (p.209) 7. Read the matter to determine its gist/main idea. (p.213) 8. The requiring a brief of the text. (p.214) 9. The way to provide our own opinion on the text. (p.214) 10. The discussion with unrelated sentences and each presented with an error to be detected by the test-taker. (p.207) 11. The items are difficult to construct and validate, and classroom teachers have no enough time to design it. (p.206) 12. Teachers were able to be given a diagnostic chart of each student‟s results within all of the specified categories of the test. (p.208) 13. To quickly identify important elements, timing may also be calculated into a scoring procedure. (p.209) 14. A reading passage is presented, and the test-taker reads questions that must be answered in a sentence or two. (p.206-207) 15. The deletion of prepositions and conjunctions. (p.203)
  • 2. Western University Teaching Methodology Department of English Part II Chapter 08 Assessing Reading Presented by: Mr. Leang Channy Lecturer: Mr. Nourn Vanna Miss Tep Sonimul Page 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 h g f e d c b a o n m l k j i II. Filling in gaps. (p.201-215) a) Tasks at this level have combination of form-focused (1) and meaning-focused (2) objectives but with more emphasis on meaning. Interactive tasks (3) may therefore imply a little more focus on top-down processing than on bottom-up. (p.201) b) Cloze tests (4) are usually a minimum of two paragraphs in length in order to account for discourse expectancies. They can be constructed relatively easily as long as the specifications for choosing deletions and for scoring are clearly defined. (p.202) c) Some variations on standard cloze testing have appeared over the years; two of the better know are the C-test (5) and the cloze –elide procedure (6) . (p.203) d) Reading a map (7) implies understanding the conventions of map graphics, but it is often accompanied by telling someone where to turn, how far to go, etc. (p.210) e) Extensive reading (8) involves somewhat longer texts than we have been dealing with up to this point. Journal articles, technical reports, longer essays, short stories, and books fall into this category.(p.212) f) Finally, a reader‟s comprehension of extensive texts may be assessed through an evaluation of a process of note-taking (9) and/or outlining (10) . Because of the difficulty of controlling the conditions and time frame for both these techniques, they rest firmly in the category of information assessment.(p.215) g) Two disadvantages in the cloze-elide procedure are nevertheless immediately apparent: (1) Neither the words to insert nor the frequency of insertion appears to have any rationale (11) . (2) Fast and efficient readers are not adept at detecting the intrusive words (12) . Good readers naturally weed out such potential interruptions (13) . (p.204) (weed out: remove unwanted element) h) Students always enjoy the activity of receiving little strips of paper, each with a sentence on it, and assembling them into a story, sometimes called the “strip story (14) ” technique. Variations on this can serve as an assessment of overall global understanding of a story and of the cohesive dices that signal the order of events (15) or ideas (16) . (p.209) Write your answers here: 1. Form-focused 2. Meaning-focused
  • 3. Western University Teaching Methodology Department of English Part II Chapter 08 Assessing Reading Presented by: Mr. Leang Channy Lecturer: Mr. Nourn Vanna Miss Tep Sonimul Page 3 3. Interactive tasks 4. Cloze tests 5. C-test 6. The cloze –elide procedure 7. Reading a map 8. Extensive reading 9. Note-taking 10. Outlining 11. Rationale 12. Intrusive words 13. Potential interruptions 14. Strip story 15. Events 16. Ideas III. Write T for the true statement and F for the false statement then give reason why for both correct and incorrect. (p.201-215) 1. __F__ This is the example of Cloze-elide procedure, (happ_ _ _ _ _). (p.203-204) 2. __T__ Summarizing is to make an overview of the text. (p.214) 3. __T__ The act of comprehending graphics includes the linguistic performance of oral or written interpretations, comments, questions, etc. (p.211) 4. __T__ Impromptu reading plus Comprehension questions means that “Read a passage and answer some questions”. (p.204) 5. __T__ Handing scoring with an answer key or hole-punched grid, or computer scoring using scannable answer sheets. (p.203) 6. __T__ Two approaches to the scoring of cloze tests are commonly used. They are exact word method and appropriate word method. (p.202) 7. __F__ Cloze-elide procedure inserts words into a text that belong. (p.204) 8. __T__ Short-Answer Tasks, questions might cover the same specifications indicated above for the TOEFL reading, but be worded in question form. (p.206-2007) 9. __T__ Responding can be a part of conclusion. (p.214) 10. __T__ The appropriate word scoring, credits the test-taker for supplying any word that is grammatically correct and that makes good sense in the context. (p.202)
  • 4. Western University Teaching Methodology Department of English Part II Chapter 08 Assessing Reading Presented by: Mr. Leang Channy Lecturer: Mr. Nourn Vanna Miss Tep Sonimul Page 4 IV. Comprehension Questions. (p.201-215) 1. Why should we have enough contexts in a sentence with a word left out?  A sentence with a word left out should have enough contexts that a reader can close that gap with a calculated guess, using linguistic expectancies, background experience, and some strategic competence. 2. What is „Rational Deletion‟? Why don‟t they delete the difficult word in the rational deletion? Give example.  Rational Deletion is a procedure of choosing deletions according to the grammatical or discourse functions of the word. We don‟t delete the difficult words in the rational deletion due to that would be difficult to predict from the context. Example: Everyone in the crowd enjoyed the gorgeous sunset. The word “gorgeous” is not deleted from the sentence because it can be confused with the words “beautiful, amazing, and spectacular”. 3. What do the learners have to be able to in order to comprehend information in the “graphics”?  To comprehend information in the graphics, learners must be able to: - Comprehend specific conventions of the various types of graphics - Comprehend labels, headings, numbers, and symbols - Comprehend the possible relationships among elements of the graphic - Make inferences that are not presented overtly. 4. What are the assessments in the domain of skimming? What are the advantages of them?  The assessments in the domain of skimming are informal and formative assessment. They are grist for an imminent discussion, a more careful reading to follow, or an in-class discussion, and therefore their washback potential is good. 5. What are the four criteria for evaluation of a summary?  The four criteria for the evaluation of a summary: a. Expresses accurately the main idea and supporting ideas.
  • 5. Western University Teaching Methodology Department of English Part II Chapter 08 Assessing Reading Presented by: Mr. Leang Channy Lecturer: Mr. Nourn Vanna Miss Tep Sonimul Page 5 b. Is written in the student‟s own words; occasional vocabulary from the original text is acceptable. c. Is logically organized. d. Displays facility in the use of language to clearly express ideas in the text.