Fun	  with	  Form	  B	       Dr.	  Albert	  Harper	  Forensic	  Science	  Consor:um	  
LENOX	  HISTORICAL	  COMMISSION	  •    OLGA	  WEISS	  •    LUCY	  KENNEDY	  •    BOB	  ROMEO	  •    JAN	  CHAGUE	  •    AL...
OUR	  CHARTER	  •  MASSACHUSETTS	  GENERAL	  LAWS	  •  Chapter	  40	  Sec:on	  8D	  •  Historical	  Commission,	  establis...
OUR	  MISSION	  It	  is	  the	  mission	  of	  the	  Lenox	  Historical	  Commission	  to:	  •  build	  apprecia:on	  of	 ...
FORM	  B	  HISTORY	  •  Form	  B	  is	  the	  historical	  building	  survey	  recorded	     in	  the	  MARCIS	  database	...
FORM	  B	  UPDATE	                                                                         150’                           ...
Implemen:ng	  the	  Plan	  •  Larson	  Fisher	  Associates	      –  Historic	  Preserva:on	  and	  Planning	  Service	    ...
GREAT	  COTTAGES	  •  Not	  part	  of	  the	  update,	  because	  of	  the	     excellent	  documenta:on	  provided	  in	 ...
www.historicnewengland.org	  Architectural	  Style	  Guide	  	  This	  guide	  is	  intended	  as	  an	  introduc:on	  to	...
65	  Main	                                 	                                                                              ...
7	  Hubbard	                         	   –	  Zadock	  Hubbard	  Israel	  Dewey	  House	                                   ...
7	  Main	  Street 	  	                     	  Maj.	  Gen.	  John	  Paterson	  House	  1783	  This	  Federal	  style	  buil...
17	  Main	  Electa	  Eddy	  House	   	                                                     Summer	  White	  House	  C	  18...
2	  Kemble	                                          	   	  Frederick	  T.	  Frelinghuysen	  House	                       ...
12	  Housatonic                                                 	                               	   	                     ...
17	  Housatonic	                       	  Jacob	  Washburn	  House	  1825	  This	  Federal	  style	  building	  has	  two	...
27	  Housatonic	                           	  First	  County	  Courthouse	  1791	  This	  undetermined	  style	  building	...
94	  Church	                        	  Mathew	  Colbert	  House	  Built	  1853	  Greek/Gothic	  Revival	  	  This	  Greek	...
                       81	  Walker	  	                                	  William	  C.	  Wharton	  House	  -­‐	  M.	  E.	  ...
                          64	  Walker	                                  	                                                 ...
88	  Walker	                                   	  Trinity	  Episcopal	  Church	  1888	  This	  Romanesque	  style	  buildi...
95	  Old	  Stockbridge	  Rd	                                                                                 	  	  	  	  	...
265	  East	  Street	  Bartle]	  Farm	  c.	  1810	                          	  This	  wood-­‐framed	  Federal	  period	  ho...
169	  Under	  Mountain	  	  Stonover	  Farm	                                	  1890	  The	  property	  contains	  a	  comp...
Belvoir	  Terrace	      Morris	  K.	  Jesup	  Banker-­‐Philanthropist	  	  President	  of	  the	  American	  Museum	  of	 ...
317	  Under	  Mountain	                                            	  	  	  	  	  	  	  Janet’s	  House	               	  ...
Almost	  Done	  Jim	  Biancolo	  working	  to	  provide	  the	  finishing	  touches.	  	          	  Cross	  checking	  diff...
But	  that’s	  not	  all,	  folks	  LHC	  is	  busy	  on	  numerous	  other	  projects:	  	  Historic	  Street	  Signs	  i...
But	  that’s	  not	  all,	  folks	  LHC	  is	  busy	  on	  numerous	  other	  projects:	  	  Expansion	  of	  Historic	  S...
But	  that’s	  not	  all,	  folks	  LHC	  is	  busy	  on	  numerous	  other	  projects:	  	  Church	  on	  the	  Hill	  Ce...
But	  that’s	  not	  all,	  folks	  LHC	  is	  busy	  on	  numerous	  other	  projects:	  	  Demoli:on	  Delay	  By-­‐law	...
Back	  to	  the	  Future	  Sestercentennial	                          Semiquincentennial	                                 ...
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Fun with form b
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Fun with form b

104

Published on

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
104
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Fun with form b

  1. 1. Fun  with  Form  B   Dr.  Albert  Harper  Forensic  Science  Consor:um  
  2. 2. LENOX  HISTORICAL  COMMISSION  •  OLGA  WEISS  •  LUCY  KENNEDY  •  BOB  ROMEO  •  JAN  CHAGUE  •  AL  HARPER  •  JIM  BIANCOLO  •  SUZANNE  PELTON  
  3. 3. OUR  CHARTER  •  MASSACHUSETTS  GENERAL  LAWS  •  Chapter  40  Sec:on  8D  •  Historical  Commission,  establishment,  power  and   du:es.  •  Sec:on  8D.  A  city  or  town  which  accepts  this   sec:on  may  establish  an  historical  commission,   hereinaRer  called  the  commission,  for  the   preservaon,  protecon  and  development  of   the  historical  or  archeological  assets  of  such  city   or  town.  
  4. 4. OUR  MISSION  It  is  the  mission  of  the  Lenox  Historical  Commission  to:  •  build  apprecia:on  of  Lenox  history;    •  provide  guidance  on  the  treatment  of  buildings,   landscapes  and  neighborhoods  so  as  to  preserve   Lenox  history;  •  provide  leadership  in  actual  preserva:on  efforts   through  support  for  funding  efforts  (grants,   studies,  etc.)  and  development  of  appropriate  by-­‐ laws.      
  5. 5. FORM  B  HISTORY  •  Form  B  is  the  historical  building  survey  recorded   in  the  MARCIS  database  for  every  town  in   Massachuse]s.  •   MACRIS  Form  B  can  be  found  at      www.mch-­‐macris.net     330  Form  B’s  for  Lenox   332  for  Williamstown   405  for  Great  Barrington   569  for  Stockbridge  
  6. 6. FORM  B  UPDATE   150’ 13* 150’Plan  to  update   9 1588  in  LHD   17 21 150’ 25 95’ 9034  outside  LHD   5 8 18 84 24 93 100   73 80 89 94 22 26 SWT 74 87 Tuck er  St  LHC  proposal  to   81 86 68 6 71 80 71CPC  2009.   150’ 60 150’ 72Approved  at  Town   LP 48 52 65 65 66 21 62Mee:ng  2010.   GBC 42 33 51 56 47 54 11 17 50 25 27 25 4 12 35 31 18 38 46 29 27 34 25 91 77 30
  7. 7. Implemen:ng  the  Plan  •  Larson  Fisher  Associates   –  Historic  Preserva:on  and  Planning  Service      1)  Historic  District  Update        Standardize  terminology      Digital  images      Review  boundaries      Assess  poten:al  for  Na:onal  Register    2)  Outside  Historical  District    (38  proper:es)      Construc:on  dates      Architectural  styles      Assess  poten:al  for  Na:onal  Register        
  8. 8. GREAT  COTTAGES  •  Not  part  of  the  update,  because  of  the   excellent  documenta:on  provided  in  Jackson   and  Gilder’s  “Houses  of  the  Berkshire”.      
  9. 9. www.historicnewengland.org  Architectural  Style  Guide    This  guide  is  intended  as  an  introduc:on  to  American  domes:c  architectural  styles  beginning  with  First  Period  colonial  architecture  through  the  Colonial  Revival  architecture  of  the  early  twen:eth  century.  The  guide  focuses  on  common  stylis:c  trends  of  New  England  and  is  therefore  not  inclusive  of  all  American  architecture.      First  Period  1600  -­‐1700  Georgian  1700  -­‐1780  Federal  1780  -­‐1820  Greek  Revival  1825  -­‐1860  Gothic  Revival  1840  -­‐1880  Italianate  1840  -­‐1885  Second  Empire  1855  -­‐1885  Queen  Anne  1880  -­‐1910  Colonial  Revival  1880  -­‐1955  
  10. 10. 65  Main                    The  Academy  Lenox  Academy  1803  This  Federal  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  is  intact.    It  has  a  five-­‐bay  center  entrance;  wood  frame;  hipped  roof;  and  an  octagonal  cupola  with  a  spire  atop  a  tall  square  base.    On  January  5,  1803,  a  group  of  twenty-­‐five  Lenox  ci:zens  pe::oned  the  State  Legislature  to  grant  an  incorpora:on  to  their  group  for  the  purpose  of  establishing  an  Academy.    They  were  incorporated  February  22,  1803  as  “The  Berkshire  Academy,”  the  name  being  changed  to  the  Lenox  Academy  in  June  of  that  year.    The  Academy  closed  in  1866,  serving  as  a  public  high  school  from  1869  un:l  1879.    In  1879,  under  the  direc:on  of  Judge  Julius  Rockwell,  the  building  was  moved  to  a  new  founda:on  and  repaired,  reopening  the  following  year  under  principal  Harlan  H.  Ballard.    In  1886  the  building  was  again  put  to  use  as  a  public  high  school,  serving  in  that  capacity  un:l  1908.    The  Academy  was  incorporated  as  a  private  school,  the  Trinity  School,  in  1911  and  remained  in  opera:on  as  such  un:l  the  1920’s.    ARer  a  period  of  vacancy  and  the  threat  of  demoli:on,  the  decision  was  made  at  a  special  town  mee:ng  to  preserve  the  building,  and  in  1947  the  trustees  of  the  Academy  turned  the  building  over  to  the  town.    Listed  on  Na:onal  Register  of  Historic  Places  
  11. 11. 7  Hubbard     –  Zadock  Hubbard  Israel  Dewey  House                                        Birchwood  Inn  Tavern    1770      This  Colonial  Revival  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  altered.    It  now  has  a  4-­‐bay,  wood  frame;  mansard  roof  with  a  den:led  band  at  the  cornice,  gable  roof  dormers  and  shed  dormer  on  the  rear  ell.    The  original  por:on  of  the  structure  was  the  home  of  Israel  Dewey,  one  of  Lenox’s  earliest  se]lers.    Dewey,  who  established  a  home  in  the  area  by  1764,  was  one  of  the  proprietors  of  Lenox  and  served  in  a  number  of  public  posi:ons.    Like  many  Berkshire  householders,  Dewey  was  licensed  as  an  innkeeper.    He  leR  Lenox  for  Vermont  in  the  early  1790’s,  and  aRer  several  changes  in  ownership  the  property  was  acquired  by  Zadock  Hubbard  in  1798.    He  enlarged  the  house  and  opened  it  as  the  Hubbard  Tavern.    In  1806  the  building  was  sold  to  Azariah  Egleston,  a  locally  prominent  man,  and  converted  back  to  a  private  residence.    
  12. 12. 7  Main  Street      Maj.  Gen.  John  Paterson  House  1783  This  Federal  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  minimally  altered.    It  is  5-­‐bay,  center  entrance  construc:on.    It  has  wood  frame;  clapboard  siding    a  hipped  roof  with  molded  cornice  with  den:led  band  below.    This  house  was  built  for  Major  General  John  Paterson,  a  friend,  counselor  and  comrade  of  General  George  Washington,  and  led  the  Berkshire  troops..    He  was  an  advisor  to  George  Washington  and  crossed  the  Delaware  with  him.    Major  General  Paterson  did  not  occupy  this  house  for  long,  for  in  1790  he  re:red  to  Lisle,  New  York,  where  he  died  in  1808.    The  house  passed  to  his  daughter,  Hannah  Paterson,  and  her  husband  Major  Azariah  Egleston,    who  had  served  under  Paterson  and  also  par:cipated  in  most  of  the  major  ba]les  of  the  revolu:on.    Egleston  later  served  as  Jus:ce  of  the  Peace  and  state  senator.    The  house  remained  in  the  Egleston  family  through  the  19th  century,  although  later  genera:ons  used  it  as  a  summer  residence.    The  building  was  purchased  by  the  Lenox  Na:onal  Bank  in  1968  and  has  operated  as  a  bank  since  1971.          
  13. 13. 17  Main  Electa  Eddy  House     Summer  White  House  C  1886  This  Queen  Anne  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  minimally  altered.    4-­‐bay,  wood  frame,  asymmetrical  form  w/hipped  roof,  several  gable  dormers;  3  brick  chimneys-­‐2  on  R  side,  1  on  L;      This  house  was  built  on  the  site  of  an  earlier  house  demolished  in  the  late  1870’s.    The  lot  was  purchased  from  the  owner  of  that  house,  Lucy  Co]rell  by  Electa  Eddy  in  1880.    In  1885,  Charles  and  Margaret  Eddy  mortgaged  the  property  for  $  9,000,  and  the  following  year  sold  it  to  John  Egmont  Schermerhorn  for  $25,000.    The  furnishings  of  the  house  were  included  in  this  sale,  with  the  excep:on  of  several  items  men:oned  specifically  in  the  deed,  the  family  and  household  silver  and  linens,  and  the  “  ar:cles  of  bricabrac  of  a  personal  and  ornamental  character”.    Mr.  Schermerhorn  named  the  house  “The  Lanai”,  perhaps  referring  to  its  original  porches.    Frank  and  Mary  Newton  acquired  the  property  in  1992.        
  14. 14. 2  Kemble      Frederick  T.  Frelinghuysen  House                                Kemble  Inn  1881    This  Colonial  Revival  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  is  intact.    5-­‐bay,  center  entrance,  wood  frame;  hipped  roof  dormers  w/scrolled  pediments  -­‐  2  on  front,  paired  on  sides;  3  massive  brick  chimneys  w/flared  tops,  painted  white  -­‐2  side  wall  on  main  building.    Frederick  T.  Frelinghuysen,  who  served  as  Secretary  of  Treasury  under  Chester  A.  Arthur,  built  this  house  in  1881.    The  house  was  handsomely  furnished,  and  the  Frelinghuysen’s  entertained  lavishly,  with  former  President  Arthur  among  their  many  guests.    The  house  was  subsequently  owned  by  Thatcher  Adams,  who  renamed  it  “Sundrum  House”    R.J.  Flick  purchased  the  property  in  the  early  1930’s  and  lived  in  it  while  his  estate  “Uplands”,  was  under  construc:on.    It  was  then  sold  to  Mrs.  Charles  F.  Basse]  who  gave  the  school  to  the  Lenox  School  for  Boys  for  use  as  a  dormitory.      The  property  was  purchased  by  John  Reardon  in  1993  and  converted  to  an  inn.    Most  recently,  in  2010,  Sco]  Shor]  purchased  the  Kemble  Inn  and  has  made  extensive  renova:ons.      
  15. 15. 12  Housatonic                                              Le  Heritage  George  C.  Haven  Co]age  –  Elm  Co]age  1881  This  Gothic  Revival/Queen  Anne  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  significantly  altered.    It  has  a  wood  frame  with  wood  clapboard  siding;  Jerkin-­‐head  gable  roof  &  dormer  roofs.    This  was  one  of  two  buildings    known  as  the  Elm  Co]ages,  built  by  George  C.  Haven  on  Main  St.,    just  north  of  the  Lenox  Library  (Second  County  Courthouse).    The  land  containing  the  county  jail,  jailer’s  house,  and  a  county  barn,  had  been  sold  to  Thomas  Post,  Joseph  Tucker,  Andrew  Servin  and  Henry  Bishop  by  the  “Inhabitants  of  Berkshire  County”  in  1871,  aRer  the  County  seat  had  moved  to  Pi]sfield.    Post  sold  his  por:on  of  the  lot  to  George  C.  Haven  in  1881,  at  which  :me  Haven  mortgaged  the  property  for  $6,250  and  built  two  large  summer  co]ages.    This  one  was  rented  to  W.  C.  Schermerhorn,  who  purchased  the  house  in  1887.    In  1910,  the  building  was  moved  to  its  present  site  Frank  C.  Hagyard  when  he  built  the  drugstore  at  the  corner  of  Main  and  Housatonic  Streets.    
  16. 16. 17  Housatonic    Jacob  Washburn  House  1825  This  Federal  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  altered.    Brick  construc:on  laid  up  in  Flemish  bond;  front  gable  roof  with  eave  returns;  gabled  entrance  canopy  with  large  scroll  sawn  support  brackets,  pendants  in  Italianate  style  (early  addi:on).    This  was  the  Washburn  homestead,  probably  build  by  Jacob  Washburn,  who  married  the  daughter  of  Samuel  Northrup,  an  early  se]ler  in  1786.    Jacob  was  a  prosperous  farmer  with  a  large  family  and  it  seems  likely  that  he  build  the  house  aRer  establishing  himself  in  Lenox.    He  died  at  age  62  in  1828,  but  his  wife  and  children  survived  him  and  con:nued  to  prosper.    His  children  and  grand-­‐children  became  some  of  the  largest  property  owners  in  Lenox.    The  house  remained  in  the  Washburn  family  through  the  nineteenth  century.    Mrs.  Thomas  Morse  was  the  last  Washburn  to  own  it.  
  17. 17. 27  Housatonic    First  County  Courthouse  1791  This  undetermined  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  altered.    It  is  a  wood  frame  building  with  small  den:ls  along  molded  cornice;  hipped  roof;  3-­‐bays  facing  Housatonic  St.  façade  at  2nd  floor  and  a  rear  wall  chimney  on  North  side.  Built  in  1791,  this  building  originally  stood  just  west  of  the  present  Town  Hall.    This  was  the  first  County  Courthouse,  built  several  years  aRer  the  county  seat  was  moved  from  Great  Barrington  to  Lenox  in  1784.    When  the  new  County  Courthouse  was  built  in  1815  (now  the  Lenox  Library)  this  building  became  the  Town  Hall  and  Post  Office,  and  remained  in  that  capacity  throughout  the  19th  century.    In  1901  the  present  Town  Hall  was  built,  and  this  structure  was  moved  two  years  later  to  its  current  loca:on  by  Thomas  Post.    George  Therner  purchased  it  shortly  thereaRer  for  use  as  a  business  block  and  apartments.    
  18. 18. 94  Church    Mathew  Colbert  House  Built  1853  Greek/Gothic  Revival    This  Greek  Revival/Gothic  Revival  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  is  intact.  The  original  part  of  the  house  has  2-­‐bays,  a  wood  frame,  cross-­‐gable  and  a  brick  center  chimney.  There  is  wood  clapboard  siding,  corner  pilasters  and  extra  large  entablatures  on  the  sides.      This  lot  was  originally  part  of  the  Henry  Cook  estate,  which  he  developed  and  sold  in  the  1840’s  and  50’s.  This  property  was  purchased  by  Ma]hew  Colbert  in  1853.  The  Colbert  family  also  owned  the  house  at  100  Church  Street.  
  19. 19.   81  Walker      William  C.  Wharton  House  -­‐  M.  E.  Rogers          Pine  Acres  House    1885  Queen  Anne  Style      This  Queen  Anne  style  building  has  two  stories,  an  asphalt  shingle  roof  and  has  been  altered.    There  is  a  7-­‐bay,  center  entrance.    The  building  has  wood  frame  construc:on  with  a  hipped  roof  and  2  large  brick  interior  chimneys.    The  first  floor  has  wood  clapboard  siding  and  shingle  cladding  on  the  second  floor.    Mrs.  M.  E.    Rogers  of  Philadelphia  had  this  house  built  in  1885,  for  use  as  a  summer  residence.  In  1892  it  was  sold  to  Nancy  W.  Wharton  who  summered  here  with  her  daughter.    Mrs.  Wharton’s  son,  Edward,  was  married  to  novelist  Edith  Wharton  who  was  to  become  one  of  the  most  illustrious  residents  of  Lenox.    ARer  spending  several  summers  in  Newport,  Edith  Wharton,  displeased  with  both  the  climate  and  the  lack  of  intellectual  life  there,  came  to  Lenox.      She  stayed  at  “Pine  Acres”  while  the  Mount  was  being  built.      
  20. 20.   64  Walker                Walker  House  Judge  William  Walker  House  1804,  1906    This  Federal  style  building  has  two  stories,  a  slate  roof  and  is  intact.    There  are  5-­‐bay,  and  a  hipped  roof  w/dormers.    There  are    3  large  brick  end  wall  chimneys  on  main  house-­‐-­‐2  on  the  leR,  1  on  the  right.      This  house  was  built  for  Judge  William  Walker,  a  judge  in  the  Berkshire  County  Courts.    The  house  later  passed  on  to  the  Rockwell  family,  which  also  included  a  County  Judge,  Julius  Rockwell.    The  Rockwell  family  retained  ownership  un:l  1906  when  the  property  was  acquired  by  the  Cur:s  family,  who  also  owned  the  Cur:s  Hotel.  In  the  1960’s,  the  house  was  given  to  Bordentown  Lenox  School  by  Clinton  O.  Jones,  Mr.  Cur:s’s  son-­‐in-­‐law.    It  was  used  as  a  dormitory  un:l  1973  when  it  was  sold  for  use  as  a  private  residence.        In  1980  it  was  purchased  by  Margaret  and  Richard  Houdek  who  converted  the  house  into  a  B  &  B  called  Walker  House.            
  21. 21. 88  Walker    Trinity  Episcopal  Church  1888  This  Romanesque  style  building  has  two  stories,  a  red  slate  roof  and  is  intact.  It  has  asymmetrically  organized  facades  with  an  irregular  footprint.  The  main  sec:on  (nave  &  narthex)  has  a  3-­‐bay  wide  front  &  is  6  bays  deep.      The  cornerstone  was  laid  in  1885  by  Reverend  Jus:n  Field,  assisted  by  the  former  US  President,  Chester  A.  Arthur.  Many  other  noted  craRsmen  worked  on  various  parts  of  the  church  ,  such  as  Tiffany  and  Co.  which  created  many  of  the  original  windows.  The  church  is  listed  on  the  Na:onal  Register  of  Historic  Places.  
  22. 22. 95  Old  Stockbridge  Rd                Plumstead  Plumstead    1810  This  2-­‐story  wood-­‐framed  Federal  period  house  has  received  addi:ons  and  been  remodeled  such  that  the  eclec:c  Queen  Anne  category  best  reflects  its  amended  style.    The  house  began  with  a  5-­‐bay,  center  entrance  facade  under  a  gable  roof  with  slate  shingles.    Its  second  story  slightly  overhangs  the  first  floor.    Plumstead  was  the  first  site  of  the  jail  and  the  jailer’s  house-­‐  part  of  the  structures  were  burned  down  by  a  prisoner  in  1814.    Plumstead  was  first  the  summer  home  of  Mr.  Alfred  Deveaus,  who  sold  it  to  Mrs.  Joesph  Whistler.    In  1940  the  property  was  acquired  by  Mrs.  Bruce  W.  Sandborn  then  descended  to  her  son  Carl  Weyerhauser.    In  1968,  it  was  sold  to  a  local  lawyer,  Mr.  Charles  Alber:  (who  is  now  re:red  Superior  Jus:ce  Alber:).    In  1978,  the  property  was  purchased  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  Macioge.    The  Macioge’s  sold  the  property  in  1985  to  Paul  and  Mirjana  Draskovic,  who  are  the  current  owners.        
  23. 23. 265  East  Street  Bartle]  Farm  c.  1810    This  wood-­‐framed  Federal  period  house  exhibits  the  classic  characteris:cs  of  the  type:  gable  roof,  two  stories,  five  bays,  central  entrance  and  large  brick  end  wall  chimneys.  .  Thomas  Rockwell  of  Ridgefield,  Ct.  first  se]led  in  the  Bartle]  Farm,  circa  1770.  He  is  believed  to  have  built  a  log  house  a  few  rods  sought  of  the  present  dwelling.    In  1795  Rockwell  deeded  the  farm  to  Jeremiah  Osborn,  also  of  Ridgefield,  CT.    Osborn  sold  the  property  February  16  1797  to  Zadock  Hubbard.    Hubbard  built  the  frame  house  that  is  the  rear  ell  of  the  present  house.        Allen  Metcalf  purchased  the  property  in  1808.    Originally  from  Sharon,  Ct.,  Metcalf  had  se]led  on  the  farm  later  owned  by  George  O.  Peck  in  about  1794.    Metcalf  was  a  joiner  and  a  house  builder  who  constructed  the  front  2.5  story  part  of  the  house  in  1810.    Edmand  Dewey  laid  the  cellar  for  him.    Mr.  Metcalf  also  ran  the  Lenox  Coffee  House.    Later  his  son,  Allen  C.  Metcalf,  purchased  the  Sabin  Farm  of  50  acres  south  of  his  father.    Allen  C.  Metcalf  died  in  1846  and  his  father  and  mother  moved  to  Ohio.          John  Kellogg  purchased  the  property  and  stayed  for  2  years.    The  farm  was  then  purchased  by  William  Bartle]  in  1849.    B.F.  Bartle]  inherited  the  farm  upon  his  father’s  death  on  July  6,  1857.    A  fire  on  June  24,  1881  destroyed  the  Old  Sabin  barn,  house  and  shop.    The  present  house  narrowly  escaped  
  24. 24. 169  Under  Mountain    Stonover  Farm    1890  The  property  contains  a  complex  of  farm  buildings,  almost  all  of  which  exhibit  the  architectural  characteris:cs  of  the  Arts  and  CraRs  style.    The  farmhouse  is  two  stories  in  height,  has  a  5-­‐bay  front  façade,  and  is  two  bays  deep.        Stonover  Farm  was  built  in  1890  by  John  Parsons  as  the  farm  house  for  the  Parsons  Estate,  Stonover  on  Yokun  Avenue.    The  house  was  maintained  by  Mr.  Herbert  Parsons,  a  New  York  Congressman  and  his  wife  Elsie  Crews  (who  was  one  of  the  first  female  anthropologists,  AH).    They  lived  there  with  their  daughter  who  maintained  the  property  aRer  their  death,  Mrs.  John  d.  Kennedy.    Mrs.  Kennedy  leR  the  property  to  Mr.  Herbert  Pa]erson  of  New  York.    ARer  his  death  he  leR  the  property  to  his  secretary.    The  property  was  then  purchased  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jonas  Dovydenas.      Since  the  :me  of  the  August  31,  1988  Form  B.    The  property  without  the  barn  was  transferred  to  Lawrence  and  Rosemary  Geller  in  1990.    Tom  and  Suky  Werman  purchased  the  house  in  2000  and  the  barn  in  2003  and  have  made  extensive  renova:ons  to  convert  Stonover  Farm  into  a  renowned  Bed  and  Breakfast  Inn.  
  25. 25. Belvoir  Terrace   Morris  K.  Jesup  Banker-­‐Philanthropist    President  of  the  American  Museum  of  Natural  History    Jesup  North  Pacific  Expedi:on              1897-­‐1902    Franz  Boas  in  charge  of  JNPE    Boas’  first  female  PhD  student  Elsie  Crew  Parsons    
  26. 26. 317  Under  Mountain                Janet’s  House    C  1790,  1820,  1850,  1906,  1970,  1980  Greek  Revival  This  2-­‐story,  3-­‐bay,  wood  frame  house  has  a  front  gable  roof  with  pediment.    Although  built  in  an  earlier  period,  the  house  has  been  remodeled  in  the  Colonial  Revival  style  c.  1900.  The  front  door  surround  has  an  entablature,  plain  pilasters,  2/3-­‐length  sidelights  with  panels  below.      This  house  could  have  possibly  belonged  to  the  Pine  Needles  Estate.    The  main  house  and  buildings  were  owned  by  Mr.  George  Daty  Blake.    At  the  :me  of  his  wife’s  death  the  property  was  sold.    In  1969  this  house  was  sold  to  Rose  Barash.    In  1971,  the  name  transferred  to  Seymour  and  Rosalyn  Barash.  They  sold  the  property  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Henry  Nadig.    The  current  owners  purchased  the  property  in  1978.    They  are  Roger  D.  and  Janet  H.  Pumphrey.        
  27. 27. Almost  Done  Jim  Biancolo  working  to  provide  the  finishing  touches.      Cross  checking  difference  between  old      and  new    Standardize  nota:on    Add  Assessor’s  data  to  Historical        Narra:ve    Match  property  names  with  MACRIS    Complete  any  missing  informa:on    
  28. 28. But  that’s  not  all,  folks  LHC  is  busy  on  numerous  other  projects:    Historic  Street  Signs  in  the  HD    Special  thanks  to    Jim  Biancolo    
  29. 29. But  that’s  not  all,  folks  LHC  is  busy  on  numerous  other  projects:    Expansion  of  Historic  Streetlights    Special  Thanks  to  Suzanne  Pelton  
  30. 30. But  that’s  not  all,  folks  LHC  is  busy  on  numerous  other  projects:    Church  on  the  Hill  Cemetery  Project    Special  thanks  to  Lucy    Kennedy      
  31. 31. But  that’s  not  all,  folks  LHC  is  busy  on  numerous  other  projects:    Demoli:on  Delay  By-­‐law    Special  thanks  to  Olga  Weiss      
  32. 32. Back  to  the  Future  Sestercentennial   Semiquincentennial   Bicenquinquagenary                                    Quarter-­‐millennial  
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×