Kotler mm 14e_18_sppt
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Kotler mm 14e_18_sppt Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 1 18 Managing Mass Communications
  • 2. Chapter Questions  What steps are required in developing an advertising program?  How should sales promotion decisions be made?  What are the guidelines for effective brand- building events and experiences?  How can companies exploit the potential of public relations and publicity?Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-2
  • 3. Old Spice’s Advertising CampaignCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-3
  • 4. Figure 18.1 The Five M’s of AdvertisingCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-4
  • 5. Developing an Advertising Program Setting Objectives Deciding on the Budget Developing the Campaign Deciding on Media Making Measurement PlansCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-5
  • 6. Advertising Objectives Informative Persuasive Reminder ReinforcementCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-6
  • 7. Factors to Consider in Setting an Advertising Budget  Stage in the product life cycle  Market share and consumer base  Competition and clutter  Advertising frequency  Product substitutabilityCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-7
  • 8. Developing the Advertising CampaignCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-8
  • 9. Viral Power of AdvertisingCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-9
  • 10. Television Advantages Disadvantages  Reaches broad  Brief spectrum of consumers  Clutter  Low cost per exposure  High cost of production  Ability to demonstrate  High cost of placement product use  Lack of attention by  Ability to portray image viewers and brand personalityCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-10
  • 11. Print Ads Advantages Disadvantages  Detailed product  Passive medium information  Clutter  Ability to communicate  Unable to demonstrate user imagery product use  Flexibility  Ability to segmentCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-11
  • 12. Print Ad ComponentsCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-12
  • 13. Print Ad Evaluation Criteria  Is the message clear at a glance?  Is the benefit in the headline?  Does the illustration support the headline?  Does the first line of the copy support or explain the headline and illustration?  Is the ad easy to read and follow?  Is the product easily identified?  Is the brand or sponsor clearly identified?Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-13
  • 14. Variables in Media Selection Reach Frequency Impact ExposureCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-14
  • 15. Figure 18.2 Relationship among Trial, Awareness, and the Exposure FunctionCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-15
  • 16. Choosing Among Major Media Types  Target audience and media habits  Product characteristics  Message characteristics  CostCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-16
  • 17. GEICO’s Message Strategy for Magazine MediumCopyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-17
  • 18. Major Media Types  Newspapers  Outdoor  Television  Yellow Pages  Direct mail  Newsletters  Radio  Brochures  Magazines  Telephone  InternetCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-18
  • 19. Place AdvertisingCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-19
  • 20. Figure 18.3 Advertising Timing PatternsCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-20
  • 21. Media Schedule Patterns Continuity Concentrated Flighting PulsingCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-21
  • 22. Measuring Sales Impact of Advertising Share of Expenditures Share of Voice Share of Mind and Heart Share of MarketCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-22
  • 23. What is Sales Promotion? Sales promotion consists of a collection of incentive tools, mostly short term, designed to stimulate quicker or greater purchase of particular products or services by consumers or the trade.Copyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-23
  • 24. Consumer-Directed Sales Promotion Tactics  Samples  Premiums  Coupons  Prizes  Cash refund offers  Patronage rewards  Price offs  Free trials  Tie-in promotionsCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-24
  • 25. Trade-Directed Sales Promotion Tactics  Price offs  Spiffs  Allowances  Trade shows  Free goods  Specialty  Sales contests advertisingCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-25
  • 26. Using Sales Promotions  Establish objectives  Select tools  Develop program  Pretest  Implement and control  Evaluate resultsCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-26
  • 27. Events and ExperiencesCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-27
  • 28. Why Sponsor Events?  To identify with a particular target market or life style  To increase brand awareness  To create or reinforce consumer perceptions of key brand image associations  To enhance corporate image  To create experiences and evoke feelings  To express commitment to community  To entertain key clients or reward employees  To permit merchandising or promotional opportunitiesCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-28
  • 29. Using Sponsored Events  Choose events  Design programs  Measure effectivenessCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-29
  • 30. Public Relations Functions  Press relations  Product publicity  Corporate communications  Lobbying  CounselingCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-30
  • 31. Tasks Aided by Public Relations  Launching new products  Repositioning a mature product  Building interest in a product category  Influencing specific target groups  Defending products that have encountered public problems  Building the corporate image in a way that reflects favorable on productsCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-31
  • 32. Major Tools in Marketing PR  Publications  Events  Sponsorships  News  Speeches  Public Service Activities  Identity MediaCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-32
  • 33. Decisions in Marketing PR  Establish objectives  Choose message  Choose vehicles  Implement  Evaluate resultsCopyright © 2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-33
  • 34. For Review  What steps are required in developing an advertising program?  How should sales promotion decisions be made?  What are the guidelines for effective brand- building events and experiences?  How can companies exploit the potential of public relations and publicity?Copyright © 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall 18-34