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Comparison of australian englishes across the states
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Comparison of australian englishes across the states

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  • 1. Charlie Angley
  • 2.  Generally there are three categories of English spoken in Australia Broad-Slang Australian or a more outback Australian General-The English that is used by the majority of the country Cultivated-The more proper, or civilised English spoken in the inner suburbs and cities
  • 3.  Commonly seen as a more slang or casual English by society Actually more cultivated The reason why South Australian English is analysed as being more proper is the ‘a’ sound in the middle of the words chance, plant and branch In S.A it is pronounced generally with an ‘ar’ sound State words include stobie poll for as in the power pole that supports telephone lines and a butcher relating to a glass of beer, which was introduced by the early German migrants in S.A
  • 4.  Victorians tend to speak in a much more casual way then that of the South Australians Insertions and reductions are extremely common in every day speak in Victoria as well as the rest of Australia What u been up too? Is a more common phrase in Victoria then anywhere else W’s are commonly inserted in words like doing and going to make them easier to say Words like Boston Bunn and footy are words that are only really used in Victoria
  • 5.  Very similar to that of the Victorian language, yet there is a sense of a more proper English towards the inner city of Sydney NSW born people generally have a much higher pitch intonation at the end of each sentence then the rest of Australia Victorian and NSW person’s tend to both say ‘elps’ instead of ‘alps’ The word ‘swimmers’ is one that is used only in NSW
  • 6.  Is slightly different to that of the NSW language Queenslanders tend to speak with a slower, more relaxed tone Pause fillers, and repetitions are extremely common in every day dialect Ah, um and ergh are present in most sentences Also input a lot of slang into everyday conversations ‘yeah, ah, going ta have a board’
  • 7.  Is another state with just minor differences from NSW English It has the basic pitch intonation as well as the reductions and insertions common in English around Australia The Western Australians have included more indigenous vocabulary in their day to day language These include a boondy for a rock or boulder and a Noongar for a spear Also tend to say derby rather then darby
  • 8.  Again the variation between the states is little when comparing Tasmanian English to the other states Although Tasmania is not part of the mainland, the variety of English that is spoken there is very strong, usually broad English Colloquialisms are extremely common Eg, mate, toey and lurk (meaning trick) all come under this category
  • 9.  Probably the best example of broad English in Australia with a few variations As well as W.A, the Northern Territory imbeds a lot of Indigenous words into their vocabulary Using a wide range of pause fillers, insertions, reductions and colloquialisms N.T is known for its simplicity when it comes to speaking and they will not complicate their sentences
  • 10.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Australian_English, Author unknown, Date accessed 20/10/11 http://clas.mq.edu.au/phonetics/phonetics/ausenglish/index.html, Robert Mannell, Date accessed 22/10/11 http://www.experiencefestival.com/australian_english_-_regional_variation: Global oneness, Date accessed 22/10/11 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=67934D28C9 4A524564A7AA4708F81A3F.journals?fromPage=online&aid=1458228, Felicity Cox, Date accessed 22/10/11 http://www.convictcreations.com/research/languageidentity.html, Author unknown, Date accessed 25/10/11 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Australian_English, Author unknown, Date accessed 27/10/11