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Suh_Korea.ppt

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  • 1. Practice of Critical Care in South Korea Gee Young Suh, MD Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Samsung Medical Center SungKyunKwan University School of Medicine Seoul, Korea
  • 2. Types of ICU • Open vs closed – Many hospitals employ open system – Some hospitals employ closed system in selected ICU’s
  • 3. Training of ICU Physicians • No formal training in critical care medicine • Chief of ICU – Surgical or multidisciplinary ICU: many anesthesiologist, surgeons – Medical ICU: pulmonologist, cardiologist – Coronary care unit: cardiologist
  • 4. Formal Training • Just few hours of clinical clerkship for medical students at most universities • Residents – No formal guideline for training residents in critical care – In 2001, working group to form a formal guideline was established by Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine • Fellows – No formal guideline – Different levels of training in different hospitals
  • 5. Key Clinical Decision Makers • Intensivist – Ventilator and hemodynamic decision making – Admission and discharge decisions • Attending physician – Family counseling – Treatment of specific diseases • Fellow/House residents – Day-to-day care of patients
  • 6. Problems Hindering Development of Critical Care in Korea • Low cost of critical care – Most hospitals: private – Medical costs: set and controlled by the government – Administrators see ICU’s as money-losing department • Few true intensivists – Even active interested doctors cannot devote full time to the ICU • No formal training or guideline in critical care
  • 7. Pressing Educational Needs • More physicians devoted to critical care medicine are needed – Teach physicians and administrators why intensivist-directed ICU’s are important and necessary – Educate physicians interested in critical care medicine the basic skills necessary to become intensivists