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PHASE III CLERKSHIP CATALOG 2009-2010

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  • 1. PHASE III CLERKSHIP CATALOG 2010-2011 Fourth Year Catalog of Learning Opportunities Clerkship Descriptions Credit Policies and Procedures Preceptorship Rotations
  • 2. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. TABLE OF CONTENTS POLICIES ON PHASE III CLERKSHIPS ................................................................... 5 COMPENSATION .................................................................................................... 6 AWARDING OF THE MD DEGREE ............................................................................ 6 PHASE III REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................... 6 ICU AND SUB-INTERNSHIP CREDITS .................................................................... 6 SUB-INTERNSHIP AND INTENSIVE CARE UNIT COURSES...................................... 7 NEW MEXICO PRECEPTORSHIP CREDIT ................................................................ 8 ELECTIVE CREDIT ................................................................................................. 8 ELECTIVE CREDIT FOR REQUIRED RESEARCH ....................................................... 9 PHASE III NON-CATALOG EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES ..................................... 10 ELECTIVE CREDIT FOR SUB-INTERNSHIPS AND ICUs ......................................... 11 REQUESTING SUB-I or ICU CREDIT FROM CSPE .................................................. 11 INTERNATIONAL CLERKSHIPS ............................................................................ 12 PROMOTION TO PHASE III.................................................................................. 14 2010-2011 PHASE III CLERKSHIP SCHEDULE ..................................................... 15 2010-2011 PHASE II ROTATION DATES .............................................................. 15 DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY ................................................................... 17 Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine ..................................................... 17 Clinical Dermatology at UNMH and VAMC ....................................................... 18 Dermatology Research at UNMH and VAMC .................................................... 19 DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE ............................................................ 20 Pediatric Emergency Medicine ........................................................................ 20 Emergency Medicine at VAMC......................................................................... 21 Emergency Medicine at UNMH ........................................................................ 22 First Track ...................................................................................................... 23 Emergency Medical Services .......................................................................... 24 Toxicology ...................................................................................................... 25 Wilderness Medicine ...................................................................................... 26 Advanced EMS and Disaster Medicine and Medical Care Under the Austere Conditions ...................................................................................................... 27 Travel and Emergency Medicine ..................................................................... 29 Leadership in Wilderness Medicine ................................................................ 31 Advanced Emergency Medicine/Critical Care ................................................. 33 International Emergency Medicine - Nepal ..................................................... 35 Evolutionary Medicine .................................................................................... 37 Emergency Ultrasound Elective at UNMH ....................................................... 39 DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE ........................................... 40 Public Health Epidemiology in Santa Fe, NM ................................................... 40 Family Practice at UNMH Sub-Internship ....................................................... 41 Health for the Public ...................................................................................... 42 Rural Primary Care in Cuba, New Mexico ........................................................ 43 Health Care for the Homeless ......................................................................... 44 Family Medicine Maternal Child Health ........................................................... 45 Writing and Healing ....................................................................................... 47 INTERDEPARTMENTAL OFFERING ....................................................................... 48 Comprehensive Ambulatory Care ................................................................... 48 DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE ............................................................... 49 Hematology Oncology Clinic ........................................................................... 49 Infectious Disease at Inpatient ...................................................................... 50 Internal Medicine at UNMH Sub-Internship .................................................... 51 Geriatric Medicine .......................................................................................... 52 Occupational and Environmental Health Course ............................................. 53 Gastroenterology ........................................................................................... 55 Nephrology .................................................................................................... 56 2
  • 3. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Pulmonary Medicine ....................................................................................... 57 Cardiovascular Elective at UNMH .................................................................... 58 Arthritis and the Rheumatic Diseases ............................................................ 59 Adult Endocrinology and Metabolism ............................................................. 60 Sleep Disorders Center ................................................................................... 61 Internal Medicine at VAMC Sub-Internship .................................................... 62 Medicine Intensive Care at UNMH .................................................................. 63 Infectious Disease Outpatient ........................................................................ 64 Alternative and Complementary Medicine ...................................................... 65 DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE ............................................................... 66 Radiation Oncology ........................................................................................ 66 DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY ............................................................................ 67 Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship ............................................................... 67 Spinal Cord Injury [SCI] at VAMC .................................................................. 68 Neurology at VAMC Sub-Internship ................................................................ 69 Child Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship ...................................................... 70 Neurology Research ....................................................................................... 72 DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCES ..................................................................... 73 Neuroscience Teaching .................................................................................. 73 DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY ...................................................................... 74 Neurosurgery at UNMH Sub-Internship .......................................................... 74 DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY .................................................. 75 Ambulatory Gynecology ................................................................................. 75 Gynecologic Oncology Sub-Internship ............................................................ 76 Maternal Fetal Medicine at UNMH ................................................................... 78 Maternal and Child Health in Guatemala ........................................................ 79 Maternal Fetal Medicine in Sierra Leone ......................................................... 80 Benign Gynecology at UNMH Sub-Internship ................................................. 81 DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS ....................................................................... 82 General Orthopaedic Surgery Sub-Internship ................................................ 82 Pediatric Orthopaedics at Carrie Tingley Hospital .......................................... 83 Orthopaedic Trauma Sub-Internship .............................................................. 85 Hand Surgery ................................................................................................. 87 Orthopaedic Spine Clinical Experience ........................................................... 88 Sports Medicine .............................................................................................. 89 DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY ............................................................................. 90 Anatomic Pathology at UNMH ......................................................................... 90 Anatomic Pathology at VAMC ......................................................................... 91 Clinical Pathology ........................................................................................... 92 Clerkship in Forensic Pathology ..................................................................... 94 DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS ............................................................................ 96 Ambulatory Pediatrics at Young Children’s Health Center .............................. 96 Pediatrics at UNMH Sub-Internship ................................................................ 98 Pediatric Cardiology ....................................................................................... 99 Pediatric Rehabilitation/Pediatric Chronic Disease ...................................... 101 Pediatric Genetics and Dysmorphology ........................................................ 102 Pediatric Hematology / Oncology ................................................................. 103 Adolescent Medicine ..................................................................................... 104 Pediatric Intensive Care ............................................................................... 105 Pediatric Infectious Disease ......................................................................... 107 Newborn Intensive Care Unit ....................................................................... 108 Pediatric Outpatient Department ................................................................. 109 Westside Family Health Outpatient Clinic ..................................................... 110 DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY .......................................................................... 112 Advanced Clinical Psychiatry [Inpatient] ..................................................... 112 Sub-Internship ............................................................................................. 112 3
  • 4. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Advanced Clinical Emergency Psychiatry [Ambulatory] ............................... 113 Neuropsychology ......................................................................................... 114 Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program ........................................................ 115 Consultation and Liaison Psychiatry ............................................................. 116 Advanced Clinical Psychiatry [Ambulatory] .................................................. 117 Psychiatric Care of Developmental Disabilities ............................................. 118 DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY ........................................................................... 119 Neuroradiology ............................................................................................ 119 Diagnostic Radiology .................................................................................... 120 DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY ............................................................................... 121 Burns and Trauma Sub-Internship ............................................................... 121 Thoracic Surgery at UNMH ........................................................................... 122 Ophthalmology ............................................................................................. 123 Otolaryngology Sub-Internship .................................................................... 124 General Surgery at VAMC Sub-Internship..................................................... 125 Pediatric Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship .................................................. 126 Urology Sub-Internship ................................................................................ 127 Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship ................................................................. 128 Surgical Critical Care ICU ............................................................................. 129 Plastic Surgery ............................................................................................. 130 Introduction to Transplantation ................................................................... 131 Vascular Surgery Sub-Internship ................................................................. 132 Pediatric Urology.......................................................................................... 133 Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery at UNMH ......................................................... 134 General Surgery Teaching Elective ............................................................... 135 Pediatric Ophthalmology .............................................................................. 136 Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery at VAMC ......................................................... 137 Clinical Applications of Anatomy .................................................................. 138 Surgical Specialties Elective ......................................................................... 139 DEPARTMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION ............................... 142 Medical Education Scholarship in Assessment or Curriculum Development .. 142 OFFICE OF GLOBAL HEALTH .............................................................................. 144 International Electives – Clinical .................................................................. 144 International Electives – Non-Clinical .......................................................... 147 PRECEPTORSHIP OFFICE ................................................................................... 149 New Mexico Preceptorship ........................................................................... 149 4
  • 5. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. INTRODUCTION The purpose of the Phase III medical curriculum at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine is to:  Provide opportunities for students to further develop their skills and knowledge of patient care  Provide opportunities for students to broaden their understanding of medicine and its specialties  Provide opportunities for students to explore fields in which they may wish to pursue careers  Provide opportunities for students to remediate deficiencies in medically relevant skills, knowledge and behaviors This catalog contains descriptive information about courses, clerkships and preceptorship opportunities available to Phase III students. The variety of learning experiences includes hospital, clinic, community and laboratory environments. The information has been condensed in this listing. Further information may be obtained by contacting the faculty evaluator. All departments and individuals offering Phase III courses have been queried regarding prerequisites, which are stated with each description in this catalog. Students are not restricted to the courses contained in this catalog and are encouraged to initiate educational experiences here or at other institutions. For information about requesting Phase III credit for rotations not listed in this catalog, please refer to the Non-Catalog Education Experiences section. POLICIES ON PHASE III CLERKSHIPS  The Committee on Student Promotions and Evaluation (CSPE) may require students to take and pass specifically designated Phase III Clerkships to remediate deficiencies in knowledge, skills or behavior important to the practice of medicine.  Study away from The University of New Mexico School of Medicine is considered a privilege and may be denied by CSPE, if the committee deems such activities are not in the best interest of the student’s education.  To receive credit for a Phase III educational experience at another medical facility, a Phase III Credit request must be submitted for consideration by CSPE at least 45 days prior to the commencement of the rotation. Failure to do so will result in no credit for the rotation.  No credit will be given for a non-catalog experience which commences prior to CSPE having the opportunity to consider the Phase III Credit Request.  A student who has had academic difficultly may be prohibited from taking Phase III clerkships away from the UNM SOM campus.  Approval from CSPE is required for a student to take any Phase III clerkship prior to promotion to Phase III. Students may not receive more than eight weeks of Phase III credit prior to promotion to Phase III. 5
  • 6. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. COMPENSATION Students are usually not permitted to receive monetary compensation for courses taken to meet graduation requirements. Special circumstances permit exceptions for clerkships taken outside the Albuquerque area. In some cases, research electives or other rotations may be approved by CSPE for credit as well as monetary compensation. Any exception must be approved by the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education and CSPE prior to taking the course. AWARDING OF THE MD DEGREE To be eligible for consideration by the faculty for award of the MD degree, a student must fulfill all of the following requirements:  Achieve a grade of Satisfactory or above in all Phase III rotations  Successfully complete the research requirement  Take the final Clinical Skills Performance Exam  Record a passing Score for USMLE Step 1, Step 2 CK and Step 2 CS  Adhere to ethical and professional standards of behavior Any first attempt “Fail” grade in a Phase III Clerkship must be successfully remediated prior to initiating another Phase III clerkship. For more information, please see the entire “Policy on Student Promotion and Awarding the MD Degree” in the UNM SOM Student Handbook. PHASE III REQUIREMENTS Intensive Care Unit 4 weeks Sub-Internship 4 weeks Comprehensive Ambulatory Care 4 weeks New Mexico Preceptorship 4 weeks Electives 16 weeks Total required 32 weeks ICU AND SUB-INTERNSHIP CREDITS Phase III Students are required to complete a four week ICU and a four week of Sub-Internship. Prerequisites for these courses include completion of all Phase II clerkships. 6
  • 7. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. SUB-INTERNSHIP AND INTENSIVE CARE UNIT COURSES Course Intensive Name of Rotation Sub-I Number Care Anesthesiology and Critical Care Sub-Internship 801 X Family Medicine Maternal Child Health Sub-Internship 781 X Family Practice at UNMH Sub-Internship 777 X Medicine Intensive Care at UNMH 622 X Internal Medicine at UNMH Sub-Internship 606 X Internal Medicine at VAMC Sub-Internship 620 X Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship 701 X Neurology at VAMC Sub-Internship 703 X Spinal Cord Injury at VAMC Sub-Internship 702 X Child Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship 704 X Neurosurgery at UNMH Sub-Internship 753 X Gynecologic Oncology Sub-Internship 653 X Maternal Fetal Medicine at UNMH Sub-Internship 654 X Benign Gynecology at UNMH Sub-Internship 656 X General Orthopaedic Surgery Sub-Internship 850 X Orthopaedic Trauma Sub-Internship 852 X Pediatric Intensive Care 684 X Newborn Intensive Care Unit 687 X Pediatrics at UNMH Sub-Internship 677 X Advanced Clinical Psychiatry [Inpatient] Sub-Internship 726 X Burns and Trauma Sub-Internship 751 X Surgical Critical Care ICU 760 X General Surgery at VAMC Sub-Internship 756 X Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship 759 X Pediatric Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship 757 X Vascular Surgery Sub-Internship 763 X Urology Sub-Internship 758 X Otolaryngology Sub-Internship 755 X 7
  • 8. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. NEW MEXICO PRECEPTORSHIP CREDIT OBJECTIVES OF THE PRECEPTORSHIP PROGRAM The preceptorship is intended to supplement traditional intramural medical education with a view of medicine as it is practiced outside the metropolitan medical center. The preceptorship is designed to provide medical students with opportunities for significant clinical service to patients, enabling student to obtain a foundation of practical experience in a community setting. The preceptorship provides the opportunity to experience the role and life of a practicing physician as a member of a family and of the community. Students are also provided the opportunity to learn about the organization and economics of health care in a variety of settings such as: community clinics, solo or group private practice or HMO. The student is required to dedicate one half day of this rotation to a community project. The community medicine project should be developed out of patient problems, basic science issues or student’s exploration of what it is like to become a member of a community as a medical provider. Students will receive more information before departure to the preceptorship site. PRECEPTORSHIP SCHEDULING Preceptorships are available in all types of practice settings, from solo to group practices, from community clinics to private multi-specialty practices. The minimum duration of the Phase III preceptorship is four weeks. If a student requests a second month, the student may receive elective credit. No student may arrange a rotation without contacting the Preceptorship Office. It is mandatory that preceptorships be scheduled through the Preceptorship Office. Once a student is scheduled for a specific rotation, that schedule is binding to the same extent as other clinical rotations. Preceptorships will only be rescheduled with extenuating circumstances. Changes must be requested within 45 days of the beginning of the rotation. Also required is an orientation interview prior to starting the preceptorship and an exit interview (within two weeks) at the end of the preceptorship. Preceptorship course numbers are as follows: Required Preceptorship: #910 Elective Preceptorship: #911 To schedule a preceptorship, contact the Preceptorship Office located in the Family Practice Building, 272-8399. Course information for the Preceptorship is at the end of this catalog. ELECTIVE CREDIT A minimum of 16 weeks in Phase III must be scheduled for elective credit. All courses listed in the catalog are approved for elective credit, including the preceptorships. Non-Catalog courses and courses at other institutions must be approved in advance by CSPE for elective credit. 8
  • 9. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. An elective is defined by the CSPE as an educational activity related to medical science. To receive elective credit, the experience must meet the following criteria:  It must be approved in advance by the appropriate UNM department chair/director, the Office of Medical Student Affairs, the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education and CSPE  It must be a medically relevant educational experience rather than a job, and the student must have adequate background so that the experience is of educational value  The performance of the student in the experience must be evaluated and reported to the Office of Medical Student Affairs at UNM SOM All of the above criteria must be met before consideration will be given to awarding elective credit for study at other institutions. Any request must be accompanied by a course description (often a description may be found in an institution’s catalog or website). ELECTIVE CREDIT FOR REQUIRED RESEARCH Students may receive elective credit in Phase III for required research according to the following criteria. Students who wish to receive Phase III elective credit for required research must register as they would for other rotations. Required research rotations are graded on a credit/no credit basis. The course number for required research elective is CLNS 900. 9
  • 10. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. PHASE III NON-CATALOG EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES Students are not restricted to the courses listed in this catalog and are encouraged to initiate educational experiences here or at other institutions. VSAS AWAY ROTATIONS The Visiting Student Application System (VSAS) is used by LCME schools to receive, review, approve and schedule away rotations. Medical Student Affairs will issue all eligible students authorizations to access this system. If a student accepts a rotation in VSAS, they must still complete an Add/Drop slip in OSS to have it added to their schedule. This process is not automatic and an away rotation approved in VSAS will NOT appear on your schedule until this task is completed. Where the Add/Drop slip or Online Workflow requests a Department Signature, the student should write “Approved in VSAS” and OSS will confirm. Students must add a VSAS Away rotation to their schedule 30 days prior to the start date. OSS will consider a rotation accepted in VSAS “pre-approved” for credit if it meets the follow criteria:  It is at an LCME School (currently VSAS is only available for LCME accredited schools)  It is 4 weeks in length  The student is using it only for “Elective” credit (Not Sub-I or ICU)  It is NOT an international rotation If the rotation does not meet that criteria, or you wish to use the away rotation to satisfy a Sub-Internship or ICU requirement, “pre-approval” does not apply and the student must follow the directions listed under Non-VSAS Away rotations in order to receive credit. NON-VSAS AWAY ROTATIONS All non-catalog experiences that are not applied for and approved through VSAS must have the prior approval of CSPE. Requests must be submitted 45 days in advance of the start of the rotation. To request approval of a non- catalog experience, the student must  Complete the Phase III Credit Request form available on the OSS website.  Provide a written description of the course, either from a course catalog or affiliated website.  Present the Credit Request and Sub-I/ICU credit request (if applicable) and course description to the appropriate UNM SOM department chair/director for review and signature approval.  Submit the request with the department chair’s signature and all other documents to the Office of Medical Student Affairs at least 45 days prior to the beginning date of the requested course. The request is reviewed by that office, UME, and is then forwarded to CSPE for final consideration. 10
  • 11. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Any student who takes a non-catalog course without the required prior approval of CSPE will not receive credit for the course, regardless of the grade given by the course instructor. Keep in mind, there is no guarantee of malpractice insurance coverage if a course has not been pre-approved by CSPE. Following CSPE’s review, the student is notified by email of CSPE’s decision regarding the request. The student is also responsible for providing the faculty evaluator with the appropriate evaluation form to receive a grade or credit. Credit for a course will not be given until a completed UNM SOM evaluation form with a passing grade is received in the Office of Medical Student Affairs. In the event of a cancelled rotation, students are responsible for meeting any policies set forth by the intended institution, including but not limited to: cancellation deadlines, fees, notifications, etc. Students must also ensure that the course is removed from their UNM SOM schedule. ELECTIVE CREDIT FOR SUB-INTERNSHIPS AND ICUs A student may use a course at another institution to meet the SUB-I or ICU credit requirement. This is rare and students are encouraged to complete a Sub-I and ICU at UNM. In order to receive Sub-I or ICU credit, programs must fulfill the following requirements:  The student must act as a sub-intern, assuming primary responsibility for overall care in an inpatient setting  Full-time physician supervision must be provided on site or by telephone  The experience must include initial or early patient contact, history and physical examination, formulation of problem list, diagnostic plan, therapeutic plan, writing orders, patient follow up, progress notes and discharge notes  In clerkships requiring on call activity the student’s activity must be in rotation with intern schedules (including night and weekend call)  No rotation may be less than four weeks. Travel or absence for pursuit of residency positions is not allowed during these clerkships, except with written permission of the service REQUESTING SUB-I or ICU CREDIT FROM CSPE Students wishing to receive Sub-I or ICU credit for an away rotation must follow the same steps as requesting Phase III credit from CSPE. In addition:  Students must complete the Sub-I/ICU Credit Request Form available on the OSS website.  Students must have the faculty evaluator from the intended institution sign the Sub-I/ICU credit form prior to submitting it to CSPE.  Retroactive requests for credit will not be considered by CSPE. 11
  • 12. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. INTERNATIONAL CLERKSHIPS During Phase III, students may choose to participate in an international clerkship which must meet the following criteria to be approved by CSPE for academic credit:  Level of participation in the elective must be active and meaningful o Experiences that are predominantly observational or passive may not be approved o Clinical care includes direct participation in care giving and decision making. o Participation in a research project involves a meaningful role.  Supervision with regard to educational goals and responsibilities must be active to ensure the quality of the experience, critical assessment and feedback on strengths and weaknesses of the student.  An individual at the clerkship site must be responsible for monitoring the student’s learning objectives, ensuring the quality of the experience and providing a written evaluation of the student’s performance. Evaluation must address the required levels of participation of the student’s clinical experience or project, gathering of information, critical management of information and setting of priorities, intervention or implementation and the ability to evaluate outcomes. A student seeking approval of CSPE to participate in an international clerkship must follow the same procedures for requesting Phase III Credit from CSPE and meet the following requirements:  Student must be in good academic standing  Student must submit a written report describing the experience to CSPE  Student must have appropriate language skills  Proposed educational activities must not violate applicable laws or regulations  Student is responsible for financing The University of New Mexico places the highest priority on protecting students’ health and safety when traveling outside the US as part of University programs. Therefore, students planning to travel outside the country must work with the Office of International Programs, 2111 Mesa Vista Hall, 277-4032 to:  Complete and submit the conditions of travel form  Purchase the following insurance policies as applicable o TRAVMED o Health Insurance which includes medical evacuation and repatriation of remains  Submit a travel itinerary and emergency contact form  Obtain health and safety information for travelers from the US State Department  Submit a copy of your passport 12
  • 13. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. PHASE III SCHEDULING PHASE II FLOAT RESCHEDULING Most Phase III clerkships have prerequisites stating that all or specific Phase II clerkships must be completed. Students who were approved to float one or more clerkships during Phase II will be required to schedule those Phase II courses prior to Phase III clerkships unless approved by CSPE. Students will be scheduled on a space available basis after the incoming Phase II students have been scheduled and in consultation with clerkship directors and CSPE. The Office of Medical Student Affairs will notify students of Phase II assignments. PHASE III SCHEDULING Students state preferences for their Phase III schedule using the Phase III schedule worksheet. Upon consultation and approval of their Match Advisor the worksheet is then submitted to the OSS. Students request all courses except the Preceptorship rotation and any rotations requiring approval from CSPE. Students register for their preceptorship requirement through the Preceptorship Office and list it in the appropriate block on the scheduling worksheet. Students should keep the following in mind when requesting courses through: • Phase II prerequisites stated in the Clerkship Catalog must be met. • Students granted departmental approval for a course must provide the appropriate documentation to the Office of Medical Student Affairs prior to listing the course on the scheduling worksheet. • Early and Regular Match Interviewing Schedules • Ambulatory Care is only offered during certain blocks. While every effort is made to accommodate students’ stated preferences, departmental needs and limitation take precedence. In developing schedules, the Office of Medical Student Affairs takes these priorities into account. By necessity, elective courses must be planned around required clerkships. Each department establishes the maximum number of students accepted for each rotation, and UNM students are given priority over students from other schools during the initial Phase III scheduling period. The Office of Medical Student Affairs maintains the official schedule of clinical clerkships for all Phase III students. Changes to that schedule may be made only with the approval of the department in which a course is offered. Courses appearing on the approved schedule are the only ones that may be used by the faculty in determining completion of degree requirements. For more information on how to change your schedule, students may contact the SOM Registrar. 13
  • 14. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. PROMOTION TO PHASE III To be eligible for consideration for promotion to Phase III, a student must fulfill all of the following promotion requirements:  Achieve a grade of Satisfactory of above in all seven Phase II clerkships.  The scholarly research proposal must be approved by the Medical Student Research Committee, or the required research project completed.  Achieve a grade of Credit for PIM, Continuity Clinical and Performance Assessments (Formerly OSCEs).  Adhere to ethical and professional standards of behavior. Please see entire policy on student promotion and awarding the MD degree in the UNM SOM Student Handbook. Except in very unusual circumstances, all required Phase II clerkships must be taken within the UNM SOM departments. Phase I and Phase II students who wish to take any Phase III clerkship must have prior approval from CSPE. Students may only receive 8 weeks of Phase III credit prior to promotion to Phase III. This generally works out to 2 courses. This rule applies to students who have delayed sitting for board exams. Students must have completed all course prerequisites established by departments or individuals offering Phase III electives. Prerequisites are stated in each course description in the catalog. Prerequisites for Sub-I, ICU and Preceptorship courses include completion of all Phase II clerkships. Exceptions to these guidelines are rarely approved. 14
  • 15. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. 2010-2011 PHASE III CLERKSHIP SCHEDULE 4/26/10-5/23/10 5/24/10-6/20/10 VACATION 6/28/10-7/25/10 6/21/10-6/27/10 7/26/10-8/22/10 8/23/10-9/19/10 9/20/10-10/17/10 10/18/10-11/14/10 11/15/10-12/12/10 12/13/10-1/9/11 1/10/11-2/6/11 2/7/11-3/6/11 3/7/11-4/3/11 4/4/11-5/1/11 5/2/11-5/29/11 2010-2011 PHASE II ROTATION DATES 4/26/10-6/18/10 6/21/10-8/13/10 8/30/10-10/22/10 10/25/10-12/17/10 1/3/11-2/25/11 2/28/11-4/22/11 Phase II Vacation: 8/14/10-8/29/10 12/18/10-1/2/11 15
  • 16. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. VISITING MEDICAL STUDENTS The University of New Mexico School of Medicine welcomes visiting medical students to participate in senior year elective clerkships. Clerkships for visiting students are coordinated by the Office of Medical Student Affairs. UNM SOM participates in the Visiting Student Application System (VSAS). All applications from students attending LCME accredited schools must be submitted using VSAS. Osteopathic Students and International Students will continue to use a paper application. For current application processes please visit our website at http://hsc.unm.edu/som/oss/Visiting_Students.shtml CONTACT INFORMATION The information in this handbook is subject to change at any time. For the most up to date information, or if you have questions regarding any policy or requirement listed in this handbook, please contact the Office of Medical Student Affairs. Physical Location: Basic Medical Sciences Building Room #107 Phone: 505-272-3414 Fax: 505-272-8239 Faculty and Staff: Eve Espey, MD, MPH, Associate Dean of Students EEspey@salud.unm.edu Sheila Hickey, MD, Assistant Dean of Students, Chair of CSPE SHickey@salud.unm.edu Todd Hynson, Registrar-Student Enrollment Director THynson@salud.unm.edu Cristina Beraun, Operations Specialist CBeraun@salud.unm.edu Sarah Abrahamson, Senior Student Enrollment Officer SAbrahamson@salud.unm.edu Anastasia Andersen, Administrative Coordinator AAndersen@salud.unm.edu Elizabeth Lopez, Senior Student Records Clerk ElTLopez@salud.unm.edu Janell Valdez, Financial Aid Manager JAValdez@salud.unm.edu Karen Sampson, Financial Aid Officer KSampson@salud.unm.edu 16
  • 17. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIOLOGY Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 801 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Saul Wiesel, MD Sally Fortner, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Charlotte Jaramillo Goals and Unique Aspects: The rotation seeks to achieve goals set by the student, in particular, the student gains an understanding of the bodily response to invasive perioperative medicine. Objectives: Student gains understanding of the affect of physiology, pathology and pharmacology on the care of a patient under anesthesia; and gains proficiency in essential anesthesia manual skills such as airway management and vessel cannulation. Student increases independence of thought in patient management and acquires insight into management of an operating room and lifestyle of an anesthesiologist. Responsibilities: Student observes and participates in all aspects of patient care, pre-operative to post operative. Student is assigned patients daily and participates in night call once a week. Student also participates weekly in the Bat Cave anesthesia simulation. Research projects are available in clinical, pharmacological, and education fields. However, participation in not required. Supervision and Teaching: Student has daily direct teaching by attending physicians and residents in the OR and attends weekly seminars with Dr. Sanders. Twelve reading assignments are made from textbooks provided by the department and material is reviewed regularly. Student is expected to attend three meetings and lectures per week and to participate in the monthly Journal Club. Evaluation: 25% - Written examination and seminar participation. 25% - Bat Cave simulator. 50% - Clinical observations. Criteria for outstanding grade: Determined by evaluation of the students assessed overall performance by supervising physicians, and based on an “Outstanding” in clinical observations and “Outstanding” in either the Bat Cave or the written exam, and at least a “Good” in the third category. 17
  • 18. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY Clinical Dermatology at UNMH and VAMC Course #: CLNS 810 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 3 Faculty Evaluator(s): R. Steven Padilla, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Michele Barth Goals and Unique Aspects: Opportunity to work in dermatology clinics at UNMH, VAMC, and UNM Student Health Center, and participate in didactic sessions with faculty and residents. Objectives: Emphasis placed on the diagnosis and treatment of the most common skin diseases and on cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases. Responsibilities: Clinical: Most days are spent in clinics. Student must attend all clinics and conferences as directed by chief resident. No night or weekend responsibilities. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Full time and volunteer faculty members supervise all teaching clinics. Didactic content: Formal instruction three times a week in the form of small conferences. Student participates in other conferences as directed by chief resident. Evaluation: All residents and faculty evaluate the student and Dr. Padilla summarizes the evaluations. Evaluation based on attendance (25%), participation (25%), and brief examination (50%). The examination, consisting of 10 Kodachrome slides and 60 additional questions, should not be difficult if all clinics have been attended and all assignments completed. Must attend all clinics and conferences as directed by chief resident. One unexcused or two excused absences results in lowering the final grade by one level (i.e. “good” to “satisfactory”). Absences may be made up by completing requirements for “outstanding” grade described below. Criteria for outstanding grade: Given only to those individuals who are outstanding in all categories and who complete one of the following on the dermatologic disease category of his/her choice, due at the completion of the rotation. Paper: eight pages in length (excluding references). OR Presentation: 15 minutes duration on a disease entity, including an in-depth historical review on morphology, histopathology and therapy. 18
  • 19. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY Dermatology Research at UNMH and VAMC Course #: CLNS 811 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): R. Steven Padilla, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Michele Barth Goals and Unique Aspects: Opportunity to work in a clinical or laboratory setting with one of the dermatology faculty or residents. Strongly recommended for a student interested in a career in dermatology. Objectives: Participate in clinical or laboratory research projects related to the skin and its diseases under supervision of faculty of Department of Dermatology at UNMSOM Responsibilities: Research: Participation in a prearranged research project. Student is encouraged to attend dermatology teaching conferences and clinics, as time permits, but performance of research activities takes priority. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: All teaching is conducted in a laboratory or clinical setting. The responsible faculty is the supervisor for the student. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: The faculty member responsible for the student’s elective is solely responsible for grading, which is entirely subjective based upon performance during the elective. 19
  • 20. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Pediatric Emergency Medicine Course #: CLNS 689 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Robert Sapien, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: To become more comfortable with the general care of the acutely ill or injured child. Objectives: Familiarize the student with general suturing and splinting procedures, and the approach to the child in the acutely ill or injured phase. Responsibilities: Research: Many on-going clinical studies in Peds ER. Required: Shift work. Ambulance ride a longs (8hrs) and Poison Center (8hrs). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Faculty always on site. Presentations (patient) to faculty or senior house officer with faculty direct supervision of house officer. Evaluation: Clinical observation. Criteria for outstanding grade: Any supervising faculty can nominate the student for Outstanding. In general, the student must be hardworking, enthusiastic, a team worker, and provide his/her patients with outstanding and comprehensive care. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 20
  • 21. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Emergency Medicine at VAMC Course #: CLNS 820 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 3 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jot Khalsa, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 Goals and Unique Aspects: This clerkship is designed to be useful in addition to a core EM rotation for students interested in pursuing EM as a career. Students destined fro non-EM specialties are also encouraged to sign up and can have the rotation tailored to their specific clinical interests. Gain experience and knowledge of emergency medicine in a busy full-service emergency department. Patients with cardiac and pulmonary disease are well represented in the New Mexico VA patient population, as are patients with multiple coexisting disease processes. The complicated VA patients provide challenges to the student practitioner. The VA also cares for Active Duty military patients and their families, affording opportunities to care for women and children. Objectives: To learn to diagnose emergency conditions, to appropriately use laboratory and diagnostic studies, to make admission and initial treatment decisions. Emphasis is placed on development of a broad differential diagnosis and the process needed to arrive at an appropriate disposition and plan. Responsibilities: Clinical: Fifteen eight hour shifts as a sub-intern in the Emergency Department working with ED attendings. Teaching: Four hours of student conference are required, and five hours of Emergency Medicine Resident conference are optional. Students work through three teaching cases per week in addition to required readings. Required: Wound care and suturing, splinting, and ultrasound skills labs. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct, by senior faculty. Didactic Content: Four hours of student conference per week. Evaluation: Daily evaluations for ED shifts and weekly evaluations of student rounds. Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding students will show near-intern level ability to synthesize clinical information, devise a treatment plan, and communicate effectively with patients, consultants and staff. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 21
  • 22. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Emergency Medicine at UNMH Course #: CLNS 821 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 8 Faculty Evaluator(s): Diane Rimple, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: To learn about the specialty of emergency medicine and gain proficiency at the evaluation and treatment of common emergency conditions. Emergency medicine deals with patients and diseases of varying severity in an outpatient setting with rapid problems analysis, treatment and disposition based on limited data. Objectives: Create a complete differential diagnosis and plan of management for common and life- threatening chief complaints. Learn effective multi-tasking of patients. Develop proficiency in basic procedures such as wound care, splinting, lumbar puncture, venipuncture and beside ultrasound. Continued exposure to a variety of normal and abnormal physical exam findings. Develop the thought process necessary to identify patients with occult diseases that are potentially catastrophic. Understand the role of the Emergency Physician in the delivery of health care, and the role of the Emergency Department in overall hospital functioning. Recognize your own limitations and the need for consultation. Responsibilities: Didactic: Four hours per week of dedicated student conference time, and the opportunity to attend an additional five hours per week of resident conference, if the student chooses. Three cases and assigned readings from “Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide” by Tintinalli, which is available for loan during the rotation. Skills: Ultrasound, EKGs, wound care and suturing, splinting, and patient simulation. Additional procedures are learned and performed in the ED. Clinical: Function as a sub- intern under the direct supervision of the ED attendings and teaching residents. Shift load is about 15-16 eight hour shifts per rotation plus four hours of conference per week. Evaluation: Student is provided feedback and evaluated at the end of each shift by the faculty and residents. These evaluations are summarized at the end of the rotation and are the bulk of the grade. Additional data from performance and participation in the student conferences is considered, including quizzes. Criteria for outstanding grade: An O is given about 10-15% of students and recognizes superior performance in all areas of the rotation. Areas of evaluation include: Interpersonal skills, data collection, data synthesis and procedural skills. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 22
  • 23. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE First Track Course #: CLNS 822 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Don Lemke, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: To enhance knowledge of the basic principles of out-patient medicine. Requires a rapid assessment of the patient’s chief complaint with subsequent treatment and disposition. Objectives: Manage common urgent care center patient complaints, perform basic laboratory procedures, splinting techniques and minor surgical procedures, focused history and physicals. Responsibilities: Reading: Will be recommended by the attendings. Observational: Observe the care of a wide variety of illnesses involving all specialties of medicine. Clinical: large amount of patient contact (approximately 20 patients per day). Student sees patients independently and reviews with attending. Hours: 9am-6pm, Monday –Friday plus one Saturday per month. Perform all tests necessary to evaluate the patient. Teaching: Informal presentation of patient’s history and physical to attendings; one presentation on a literature review. Supervision and Teaching: Direct supervision by attending physician. Required attendance at the Emergency Medicine case conferences or student conferences on Tuesday mornings. Informal case discussions with attendings. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Accomplish goals and objectives by seeing, evaluating, problem-solving and presenting patient care problems at a level of achievement well above that expected of the usual student. Additional Information: Busy clinic with a lot of clinical contact. A practical rotation regardless of future specialty plans. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 23
  • 24. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Emergency Medical Services Course #: CLNS 823 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 6 Faculty Evaluator(s): Marc-David Munk, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: Enhance appreciation for the clinical care provided by EMS, including the limitations and challenges of the prehospital and interhospital environments. Understand the education and training of EMTs and paramedics. Understand the scope of the work of the EMS Medical Director. Objectives: 1. Clinical patient care in the prehospital setting. 2. Educational experience in the classroom and laboratory settings. 3. Interaction with EMS Medical Directors. Responsibilities: Observational: Basic and advanced life support procedures during actual emergencies in the community setting; patient care transfers with clinical care provided en route; Educational classes and research meetings. Clinical: Airway management with basic adjuncts, 12-lead ECG & Analysis, BGL, placing intravenous lines and PPV. Research: Potential involvement in ongoing research projects. Teaching: Presentation of at least one paramedic course lecture; participation in skills workshops; presentation of clinical care summaries to the Medical Director or designee; Trauma Life Support and PALS courses may be offered on a case-by-case basis. Required: No night call. No subintern requirements. Minimum of 60 direct contact hours, including 32 hours of EMS shifts with area service providers. Optional: Attendance at statewide EMS meetings, departmental meetings, and other educational opportunities. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Steve Weiss, MD, Laura Banks, DMV: Faculty evaluation and direction provided in weekly meetings. Bill Raynovich: Daily coordination and contact. Didactic content: Assigned topical readings and texts. Evaluation: Based on review of experience journal and clinical reports, self-assessment and direct observation of performance with feedback. Written examinations: clinical and administrative (e.g. ACLS, Practice Protocols, Medical Director Guidelines and Responsibilities), focused topic paper. Criteria for outstanding grade: Meet minimum objectives with outstanding preparation and presentation of teaching cases, participation in EMS activities and thorough assessment and review of EMS clinical cases and care. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 24
  • 25. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Toxicology Course #: CLNS 824 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Steven Seifert, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Steven Seifert, MD Goals and Unique Aspects: Meet minimum objectives with outstanding preparation and presentation of teaching cases, participation in EMS activities, and thorough assessment and review of EMS clinical cases and care. Objectives: Enable the student to integrate basic pharmacology with clinical care of overdoes patient. Enable the student to manage the emergency care of the overdose patient. Responsibilities: Observational: Inpatient clinical rounds. Clinical: Toxicology inpatient consults, Emergency Department consults. Research: Poison Center and quality assurance and education projects, 30-minutes lecture on toxicology topic, opportunity to publish case reports, and Journal Club. Required: Pre-rounding. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily teaching rounds by Drs. Seifert, Rogers and Benson and Poison Center pharmacists. Didactic content: A notebook and directed readings in toxicology are provided. Completion of toxicology goals and objectives. Evaluation: Based on clinical observation. Criteria for outstanding grade: Participate in patient care opportunities, interact in teaching sessions, demonstrate good grasp of toxicology fundamentals in directed readings, complete short project evaluating selected questions in toxicology. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 25
  • 26. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Wilderness Medicine Course #: CLNS 825 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 20 Faculty Evaluator(s): Darryl Macias, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Medicine and Surgery; and either Pediatrics, OBGYN, or Family Practice. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: Learn Wilderness preparedness, emergency procedures and treatment, and strengthen leadership, teamwork and communication skills. Objectives: Learn the wilderness medicine core curriculum as developed by the Wilderness Medical Society. Core curriculum includes, but is not limited to: high altitude illness, environmental emergencies (heat, cold), medical kit development, orthopaedic injury management in the field, wound care, plant toxicology, bites and stings, travel medicine (infectious disease), search and rescue, patient assessment and field management. Responsibilities: Observational: all skills are observational and hands on. Clinical: Students work through scenarios of wilderness emergency medicine in outdoor setting. Teaching: Wilderness medicine topics are presented in a tutorial setting using cases as the starting point: Didactic and hands on teaching. Required: Eight hours a week in outdoor field work: skill stations, practical scenarios. Sixteen hours a week in group sessions: four hours didactic lectures, eight hours tutorial working through relevant cases, four hours skills. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by faculty facilitators and ED attendings. Emergency Medicine residents and community experts may present some didactic sessions. Didactic content: Auerbach Wilderness and Environmental Medicine text, cases and lectures. Evaluation: Based on clinical observations, tutorial and scenario/skills assessment. Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding performance (top 10%) Additional Information: This rotation is only offered once per year, generally in March. Several field trips throughout New Mexico. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 26
  • 27. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Advanced EMS and Disaster Medicine and Medical Care Under the Austere Conditions Course #: CLNS 827 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 8 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): Diane Rimple, MD Prerequisites: Prior completion of General Emergency Medicine or Pediatrics Emergency Medicine or basic EMS clerkship. Must be Phase III student in good standing. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: 1. Develop basic skills in providing patient care under austere conditions with special emphasis on disaster medicine. 2. Develop an understanding of Disaster Medicine infrastructures nationally and locally. 3. Develop an understanding of available International Medicine resources and organizations. 4. Appreciate the differences in providing care under wilderness, international and disaster conditions. Objectives: At the end of the rotation the student should be able to: Describe a system for mass casualty triage. Decontaminate potentially exposed patients. Describe the principles of the Incident Command System. Provide advanced life saving care to adults and children. Demonstrate their ability to improvise in order to initiate a wilderness or confined space rescue as a team. Demonstrate proficiency in extremity immobilization and intubation under austere and difficult conditions. Perform basic rope management including setting anchors, belaying, z pulleys and appropriate knots. Organize their own wilderness medical kit. Responsibilities Responsibilities: Observational: The student will act primarily as an observer during “ride along” activities with Albuquerque Fire Department paramedics. They will fly along with the paramedics and flight nurses with Life Guard fixed wing crews. Clinical: Students will be acting at a Sub-Intern level during 3 shifts in the UNM ED. The will assume primary responsibility for data gathering and interpretation of data. With faculty supervision, they will develop and implement a plan for diagnosis and treatment. Required: Attendance and participation in each of the didactic sessions. Completion of ADLS and ACLS. Satisfactory performance during 3 clinical shifts in the UNM Emergency Department. Participation in core educational experiences including: Confined space rescue, Eco Resus Challenge, Decontamination Exercise, Lifeguard Air Medical Transport flights, AFD ride alongs. Supervision and Teaching: Faculty members of the Department of Emergency Medicine will: Directly supervise students during all clinical activities; Provide all of the core didactic content; Provide the ACLS and ADLS courses; Supervision during ride along activities will be provided by licensed EMT-Ps or Flight Nurses. Didactic content: ACLS and NDLS course didactics, Orientation to UNM ED and elective requirements, Building Blocks of Disaster Medicine, 27
  • 28. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Advanced EMS and Disaster Medicine and Medical Care Under the Austere Conditions (continued) Course #: CLNS 827 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 8 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): Diane Rimple, MD Prerequisites: Prior completion of General Emergency Medicine or Pediatrics Emergency Medicine or basic EMS clerkship. Must be Phase III student in good standing. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Disaster Medicine Assistance Teams, Mass triage, Medical treatment of blast injuries, Medical treatment of crush injuries, FEMA Incident Command System 100, 200, 700, 800 courses, Research in Disaster Medicine, Myths in Disaster Medicine, Tactical Emergency Medicine: Urban Search and Rescue, International Medicine Table Top Exercise, Pandemic Influenza Table Top Exercise, International Medicine Opportunities: Opportunities and Hurdles, MSF in Darfur , UNM Emergency Residents’ Weekly Conference (5 hours standard resident curriculum), UNM Emergency Resident Journal Club. Readings will be provided for each lecture and students will be loaned a textbook for background reading. A comprehensive orientation manual will also be provided. Evaluation: All students will be evaluated based on: Successful completion of ACLS and NDLS courses, Clinical performance in the ED, Participation in core activities. This is a P/F course Additional Information: This is an advanced, career track rotation that builds on the knowledge and skills obtained in the basic rotations in emergency medicine. IT is primarily intended for students interested in pursuing a career in acute care medicine, EMS, public health, disaster medicine or international medicine. This course is only available once per year, during the 9/20/10 block. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 28
  • 29. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Travel and Emergency Medicine Course #: CLNS 828 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jim Fleming, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 Goals and Unique Aspects: Travel Medicine is a rapidly developing area of knowledge with applications to a variety of medical specialties. In this elective, students will learn to conduct a pre-travel workup and patient counseling in the travel medicine clinic at UNM. Students will also learn emergency medicine as it relates to travel and expedition medicine through tutorials and shifts at the VA emergency department. Students will also learn how travel medicine concepts apply to emergency practice as disaster medicine. The elective will show how travel medicine information can benefit some emergency medicine patients, specifically military personnel, disaster victims, immigrants, and homeless travelers. Objectives: Through lectures, case discussions, scenarios, readings and clinical experiences with travel patients, students should be able to: Understand tropical paristology pharmacology, prevention and treatment; discuss public health issues relating to third world disease & foreign aid priorities; understand the key components of a travel medicine history and exam; recognized clinical presentation of malaria, dengue fever, hemorrhagic fevers; describe malaria prophylaxis and travel vaccinations for travelers to Africa, Asia, South America; broaden understanding of the differential diagnosis for traveler’s diarrhea; recognize manifestations of tropical arthropod-borne disease in military personnel; appreciate how emerging infectious diseases, such as SARS and avian influenza, impact the emergency department. Responsibilities: Observational: There will be an opportunity to see travel medicine cases first hand in the Travel medicine clinic at UNM. Travel medicine faculty will provide up to date travel vaccination and chemoprophylaxis information. Students will also do shifts at the VA emergency department where many patients have had direct experience with tropical diseases. Malaria and leishmaniasis are only two examples of diseases faced by new veterans. Clinical: Students will have direct patient care opportunities in the emergency department and travel medicine clinic. Teaching: Students will have opportunities to pursue in depth study of selected travel medicine topics and present these to the faculty, staff and students in the travel clinic and ED. Required: 5 travel clinic days/ED shifts per week, including 2 weekend ED shifts during the rotation. Weekly tutorials and readings in travel medicine. No overnight call. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by UNM travel medicine clinic faculty and emergency department faculty. Didactic content: Student will be assigned readings and 29
  • 30. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Travel and Emergency Medicine (continued) Course #: CLNS 828 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jim Fleming, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 will be expected to participate in tutorials and lectures. Partial reading list: Desowitz, Robert S. The Malaria Capers: More Tales of Parasites and People, Research and Reality. Desowitz’s cogent discussion of a variety of tropical diseases and the politics of combating them. Evaluation: The RIME (Reporter, Interpreter, Manager and Educator; Pangaro, et al.) model will guide feedback to students. Individual faculty (ED and travel clinic) evaluations will make up 80% of the grade. Participation in didactic sessions, tutorials, and reading discussions will make up 20%. Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding students will show proficiency in integrating ravel and emergency medicine concepts in the clinic and ED. The grade of “outstanding” will be awarded to students with exceptional or near exceptional performance in the following categories: professionalism, history and exam and presentation skills, ability to manage clinical problems and convey information effectively to patients and providers. Additional Information: Availability of this course TBD. Contact Emergency Medicine Department for more information. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 30
  • 31. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Leadership in Wilderness Medicine Course #: CLNS 829 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jot Khalsa, MD Prerequisites: Experience with wilderness medicine or international medicine or expedition medicine. Wilderness first responder, National Outdoor Leadership School or EMS experience also acceptable. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 Goals and Unique Aspects: Student will join faculty of Wilderness, International and Improvisational Medicine (WIIM) clerkship in planning educational modules and skills labs. Student will participate in lectures, course organization, and development of outdoor laboratory sessions and patient scenarios. Student will develop teaching skills, organizational abilities, and interpersonal skills needed to carry out a logistically complex clerkship. Objectives: By the end of this elective, the student will be expected to: learn how to develop education labs in wilderness medicine; gain experience in leading a tutorial on a wilderness medicine topic; develop and participate in patient scenarios in wilderness medicine; learn wilderness ALS and BLS skills while teaching them to other participants; gain teaching experience while leading small group sessions during a backcountry wilderness excursion; learn how to lead participants through physically difficult skills stations during the final exam for the Wilderness Medicine Clerkship. Responsibilities: Observational: Student will observe and help teach patient scenarios in the wilderness BLS/ALS module, BATCAVE, backcountry excursion, and Eco-Resus challenge, among others. Contact WIIM faculty for additional details. Clinical: No direct patient care. Research: A variety of Wilderness Medicine research opportunities are available. Teaching: Student is expected to lead a tutorial for participants in the WIIM clerkship and lecture opportunities will be available. Leadership roles in multiple education laboratories will be encouraged. Required: Some overnight activities and a multi-day excursion are required. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Director and Co-Director of WIIM clerkship will provide supervision. Didactic content: Student will be assigned readings from Wilderness Medicine, text by Paul Aurbach. Evaluation: Student will work closely with faculty during the 4 week clerkship. Evaluation will be based on performance during several modules during the course. Evaluations by main faculty of Wilderness medicine clerkship will provide 80% of the grade. 20% of the 31
  • 32. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Leadership in Wilderness Medicine (continued) Course #: CLNS 829 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jot Khalsa, MD Prerequisites: Experience with wilderness medicine or international medicine or expedition medicine. Wilderness first responder, National Outdoor Leadership School or EMS experience also acceptable. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 student’s grade will be derived from evaluations from participants (students, residents) in WIIM clerkship. Criteria for outstanding grade: The preceptorship requires a different skill set from most Phase III rotations. Successful students will demonstrate leadership and teaching ability, skill in managing students in demanding outdoor labs, and contribute to the effectiveness of the WIIM clerkship. The grade of outstanding will be awarded to students receiving commendable evaluations from WIIM participants and who perform at exceptional or near exceptional on visual analog scale for the following: professional and interpersonal skills, organizational ability, contribution to skills labs, tutorials, BLS/ALS modules, small group teaching and final exam. Additional Information: This course is only available once per year, generally in March. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 32
  • 33. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Advanced Emergency Medicine/Critical Care Course #: CLNS 832 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Isaac Tawil, MD Prerequisites: Prior completion of general Emergency Medicine clerkship Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Isaac Tawil, MD; itawil@salud.unm.edu Goals and Unique Aspects: 1. To develop a comfort level tending to the critically ill medical and surgical patients in the Emergency Department. 2. To learn the basics of resuscitation of the various shock states. 3. To gain an appreciation for the crossover between Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Medicine. 4. To learn the fundamentals of ICU care for a wide variety of pathologies, including traumatic illness, neurosurgical emergencies and critical medical conditions. Objectives: At the end of the clerkship the student should be able to: Differentiate the various shock states and a comprehensive approach to their treatment; Organize treatment priorities during resuscitations both in the emergency department and the ICU; Discuss the fundamentals of critical care including ventilator management, hemodynamic monitoring, nosocomial infections, metabolic disturbances, and managing multi-system issues. Responsibilities: Clinical: The student will function as a subintern under the direction of ED/ICU attendings and senior residents while in the respective departments. There will be a particular focus on care of the acute trauma or medical resuscitative cases. Didactic: There will be 2 weekly lunch time Trauma/Critical care lectures. There will also be another weekly EM/CCM didactic session led by EM.CCM physicians. Each student will be expected to present a lecture on a EM/CCM topic to a resident level audience. If available during the months of rotation, the student will be able to attend our ATLS course and the FCCS (Fundamentals of Critical Care Support) course. Skills: Vascular access, ultrasound, EKG interpretation and others. Simulation: Resuscitation skills are honed during simulations using our state of the art “Simulation Lab”. The students will have several didactic sessions practicing resuscitation scenarios on the patient simulator. Evaluation: Student feedback will be provided and evaluated by faculty and residents at the end of each ED shift or ICU week. Overall, the student will be graded using the following paradigm: 60% based on clinical performance, 30% based on performance during didactic sessions, 10% based on the presented lecture. An outstanding grade will be given to students who achieve greater than 85%. 33
  • 34. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Advanced Emergency Medicine/Critical Care (continued) Course #: CLNS 832 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Isaac Tawil, MD Prerequisites: Prior completion of general Emergency Medicine clerkship Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Isaac Tawil, MD; itawil@salud.unm.edu Additional Information: This course is offered during during certain blocks only, please contact the department for dates. This is an advanced career track rotation that builds on the basic knowledge and skills obtained during the basic rotations in Emergency Medicine and critical care. It is primarily intended for students interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine and critical care. As the subspecialty of critical care medicine is becoming a more popular career path for emergency physicians, this rotation is intended to propagate that interest and highlight the crossover between the two disciplines. Selection Criteria: As this unique rotation promises to be a sought after clinical experience, the following are required prior to approval: a completed CV and a letter of interest explaining why you would like to participate in this rotation should be sent to Dr Tawil. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 34
  • 35. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE International Emergency Medicine - Nepal Course #: CLNS 833 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4-5 Weeks Students per Rotation: 12 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): David Wachter, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: David Wachter, MD Goals and Unique Aspects: See objectives. Objectives: To examine the major barriers to health and provision of medical care in Nepal which are common to other Developing Countries using selected readings, on-site study and discussions; To explore approaches to overcoming those barriers through site visits and discussions; To learn to diagnose and treat problems commonly encountered in Travel/Tropical medicine and Altitude/Mountaineering Medicine through readings, discussions and first hand experience in the mountains; To learn to use ultrasound for emergency medical diagnosis and as an adjunct to treatment in a resource limited setting. Responsibilities: We will visit teaching hospitals in Kathmandu and Dharan, in which we will co-host courses in emergency ultrasound and important aspects of trauma care with our Nepali colleagues. We will also teach ultrasound in smaller hospitals and clinics in rural settings. Students will initially attend conferences as trainees, and will help with presentations and hands-on labs as the month progresses. Bedside rounds in emergency departments and clinics, discussing cases with local health care providers and introducing them to the use of diagnostic bedside ultrasound. We will visit traditional medical clinics where we will be given lectures on Ayurvedic medicine, Tibetan medicine and Chinese medicine/Acupuncture by experts in those fields. The group will travel to the jungle preserve of Chitwan national park where lectures will be given on Malaria, Kala Azar, and other tropical diseases, as well as other common local emergency medical problems such as cobra and krait envenomations and organohosphate poisoning. Supervision and Teaching: Lectures and practical training sessions will be directly taught by faculty, including emergency Physicians from the US and Nepal, as well as practitioners of traditional medicine. Due to the brief exposure to the local medical system and culture, students will not perform independent clinical work, but will gain clinical experience through group rounds led by faculty from Nepal and the US. Discussionson reading material and site visits will be led by course faculty. 35
  • 36. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE International Emergency Medicine – Nepal (continued) Course #: CLNS 833 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4-5 Weeks Students per Rotation: 12 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): David Wachter, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: David Wachter, MD Evaluation: Students will be assessed by faculty coordinator based on observation of participation in discussions and performance in hands-on training (ultrasound and trauma labs). They will also be given a final examination covering key concepts. “Outstanding” grade will be given to those who show exceptional initiative and superior understanding of core subject matter, participate effectively in conferences and trainings, and perform in the top quartile on the final exam (must meet all of above criteria). Additional Information: This course is only available in the late fall/winter. Please contact the department for exact dates. Please see http://web.mac.com/drwachter/iWeb/Nepal%20Page/Itinerary%20Fall%202009%20(te ntative).html for more information. This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 36
  • 37. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Evolutionary Medicine Course #: CLNS 835 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 10 Faculty Evaluator(s): Joe Alcock, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 Goals and Unique Aspects: Evolutionary biology has important implications for the medical concepts of health, "normal" physiology and illness. The last 15 years have seen increased exchange of information between the two fields of study. For instance, medicine has embraced evolutionary concepts that relate to pathogen resistance to antibiotics. We will explore how natural selection influences pathogen-host interactions, human genetics, immunology, development, cancer, and diseases of senescence. Objectives: Understand basic concepts of evolutionary biology as they relate to disease and health; Discuss natural selection, antibiotic resistance and emerging diseases and implications for public health; Understand how gene-environment mismatch contributes to diseases of western civilization; Recognize how some disease symptoms represent host defenses and others are pathogen virulence factors; Describe how common genetic polymorphisms such as sickle cell trait and Factor V Leiden can result from natural Selection; Understand how viruses can cause cancer and how selective processes contribute to carcinogenesis; Learn how genetic conflicts contribute to reproductive diseases. Gain insight into evolutionary hypotheses of human menopause and morning sickness; Recognize the link between diet, obesity, diabetes, and evolution This is a lecture, tutorial, and discussion based course. Students are expected to attend daily lectures, interactive casebased discussions, and presentations given by guest lecturers and other students. Student will have opportunities to pursue in-depth study of evolutionary medicine topics and present these to the faculty and students. Evaluation: Direct teaching by clerkship faculty and guest lecturers. Students will be expected to attend all lectures. Students should complete assigned readings prior to that day's lecture and contribute to discussions. Each week, following lectures and discussions, students will be asked to complete a written summary of that week's topic. As a one- time assignment, students will be asked to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of journal articles in evolutionary medicine. For this "Journal Club", each student will be assigned a journal article to present to the group and provide commentary. Finally, each student will make a presentation during the last week of the course. Students should choose an area that interests them and produce a brief talk (powerpoint or equivalent) to present to the group. Participation (35%), Journal Club (10%), Weekly Writing Project (20%), Final Presentation (35%) 37
  • 38. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Evolutionary Medicine (continued) Course #: CLNS 835 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 10 Faculty Evaluator(s): Joe Alcock, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Contact: Vicky Rechkemmer 505-265-1711 x2621 Additional Information: This rotation is offered all year. Certain months will feature guest speakers and additional educational opportunities. Please email Dr. Alcock for more details. Partial Reading List 1. Introduction and Overview of Evolutionary Medicine. Chapter 1 in: Evolutionary Medicine and Health. 2008. Trevathan WR, Smith EO, McKenna JJ. Page 1-54. 2. The Great Opportunity: Evolutionary applications to medicine and public health. Nesse, RM and Steams SC. Evolutionary Applications 1 (2008) 28-48. 3. The adaptive value of fever. Kluger, MJ. et al. Infectious Disease Clinics North America. 1996. 4. Carriership of Factor V Leiden and Evolutionary Selection Advantage. Lindqvist PG, Dahlback B. Cur Med Chern 2008. 15: 1541-1544. 5. Crossing the Line: Selection and Evolution of Virulence Traits. Brown NF et al. 2006. PLoS Pathogens. 2(5) e42. Pages 0346-0353 6. Cancer as a microevolutionary process. Komarova NL and Wodarz D. Chapter 22 in: Evolution in Health and Disease. Second edition. Eds. Steams SC and Koella JC. 2008. pages 289-299. 7. Emergence of new infectious diseases. Woolhouse M and Antia R. Chapter 16 in: Evolution in Health and Disease. Second edition. Eds. Steams SC and Koella JC. 2008. pages 215-252. 8. Haig D. Genetic Conflicts in Pregnancy. Quarterly Review of biology. Volume 68(4). Dec 1993, 495-532. 9. The Developmental Origins of Adult Health. Kuzawa C. Chapter 18 in Evolutionary Medicine and Health. 2008. Trevathan WR, Smith EO, McKenna JJ. pages 325-349. 10. Still Pondering an Age-Old Question. Flatt T and Promislow EL. 2007. Science (318) 1255-1256. Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 38
  • 39. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE Emergency Ultrasound Elective at UNMH Course #: CLNS TBA Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1-2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Gillian Baty, MD Prerequisites: All Phase II Clerkships and at least one EM clerkship. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Annette Creasman Goals and Unique Aspects: Emergency Ultrasound is a clinical elective that integrates emergency medicine knowledge with technical bedside ultrasound skills. Didactics are in a small-group format, with PowerPoint lectures, discussion and demonstration. Hands-on scanning will be with rotation preceptor, EM residents and EM faculty in the emergency department. Students will have plenty of opportunity for primary hands-on scanning, as well as small group scanning participation. Objectives: Describe the basics of ultrasound physics, ultrasound equipment and image/control modification to maximize image quality. Describe the utilization and application of clinician-performed limited bedside ultrasound and its differences from comprehensive ultrasound studies. List the indications, scanning protocols, and limited emergency diagnostic possibilities for the common EUS applications. Integrate existing clinical knowledge into use of bedside ultrasound. Recognize normal and abnormal sonographic anatomy. Responsibilities: Students are expected to do outside reading and study, to document scans they perform, to attend all weekly small-group lectures and clip review sessions (5 hours/week), come to scheduled shifts with the rotation preceptor which may be weekday, weekend, day, eve or night shifts (4 hours / week), and additional hands-on scanning (11 hours/week). There are no specific research activities. There are also occasional EM Conference lectures or small-group sessions offered for EM residents that students are welcome and encouraged to attend and participate in. Evaluation: Pre-rotation exam. Student evaluation of EUS Elective and faculty. Faculty and resident evaluation of student. All evaluations submitted by faculty they have worked with and rotating residents, scores will be averaged. A score of 4.0 and above (out of 5.0) is needed for an outstanding in the clinical area. Post-rotation exam: score of 70% or better needed to pass. Final grade: 70% from clinical evaluations, 30% from participation in didactic sessions (an evaluation by didactic faculty, currently Dr. Baty) Additional Information: This rotation adheres to a strict add/drop policy. No changes are allowed less than 14 days prior to the rotation start date. This includes requesting to drop the rotation. 39
  • 40. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Public Health Epidemiology in Santa Fe, NM Course #: CLNS 776 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): C. Mack Sewell, PhD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: New Mexico Health Department Epidemiology Branch 505-827-0006 Goals and Unique Aspects: To develop practical knowledge of epidemiology as a tool to promote health and prevent disease at the population level. Practicum-type rotation. Student actively involved in investigations of disease occurrence and prevention. Objectives: To identify and apply resources to detect, investigate and prevent acute outbreaks of disease. To outline steps to analyze the impact of disease on population. To use Epi lnfo or other epidemiological software to collect and analyze health data. To understand basic principles of public health surveillance, descriptive epidemiology, analytic epidemiology and applied public health practices. To learn to critically read medical literature describing epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. Responsibilities: Practicum: Student participates in ongoing disease control activities. Academic: Student attends and engages in didactic sessions with preceptor and others; reads assigned chapters and journal articles and analyzes them critically. Research: Student develops and completes a short research project in an area of mutual interest. Supervision and Teaching: Student works closely with Epidemiology staff. A primary preceptor, for both daily activities and the research project, is assigned. Rounds held daily to discuss events and current investigations. Evaluation: Student evaluated on thorough completion of daily investigations and quality of the research project. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Thorough investigation and response to assigned problems, and completion and presentation of research project to meet the criteria for presentation set by an Epidemic Intelligence Service Fellow. Additional Information: Office of Epidemiology with a staff of 45+, including 12 doctoral level and 11 masters or nursing level epidemiologists, computer support personnel, and others, is involved with acute infectious /environ-mental disease outbreaks; analyses of infectious and noninfectious conditions affecting public health, including HIV/AIDS, injury epidemiology, cancer epidemiology, diabetes surveillance, substance abuse epidemiology, lead toxicity prevention, investigation and risk assessment of environmental contamination; and other issues. The rotation is a unique opportunity to become familiar with medicine at the population level and to learn useful approaches to disease prevention and public health. 40
  • 41. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Family Practice at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 777 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Attendings and Chief Residents Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Ann Thibodeaux Goals and Unique Aspects: In depth experience caring for individuals and families in a hospital setting; biological and psychosocial aspects of illness. Objectives: Increase skill level in caring for hospitalized patients through increased responsibility (supervised) for patients. Provide the opportunity to take increasing responsibility for the care of patients in the inpatient setting. Work in a team of residents, consultants, attendings, social workers, discharge planners, etc. Gain experience working with consultants and primary health care providers while patients are hospitalized. Become familiar with and use the principles of Evidence Based Medicine in their study, using EMB literature searches and critically evaluating the literature. Responsibilities: Observational: Grand rounds Wednesdays, 12:30pm-3:00pm. Clinical: Morning and afternoon rounds, responsible for 1-3 patients. Night Call: Every fourth night. Average day: 7:00am-5:30pm. Students participate in discharge planning and ethics consultations, accompany patients to surgery and diagnostic procedures, and may make home visits to discharged patients. Teaching: Teaching patients self-care, compliance with prescribed regimens, prevention of deleterious habits. Responsible for teaching the health care team on inpatients rounds, using the principles of EBM. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Close supervision and teaching by attending faculty and chief resident. Didactic content: Grand Rounds, inpatient rounds and morning report. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Quality of care provided and degree of responsibility shown for patients. Degree to which student researches learning issues and teaches others on health care team. Participation in discharge planning, ethics consultations, teaching rounds. Additional Information: 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. 41
  • 42. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Health for the Public Course #: CLNS 778 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Veronica Plaza, MD, MPH Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Veronica Plaza, MD, MPH Goals and Unique Aspects: To provide a population level understanding of the health problems in New Mexico with an emphasis on the integration of public health and medicine. Objectives: Understand health problems in New Mexico and how the public health system addressed those problems, the basic tools of public health, especially epidemiology, and the role medical professionals can play in fostering the health of communities. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe particular aspects of the public health system in New Mexico including, but not limited to, outbreak investigation epidemiology, vaccination programs, maternal-child programs, chronic disease epidemiology, and health policy advocacy. Clinical: May have the opportunity to work in public health clinics such as the STD clinic. Teaching: Assignment of an educational role defined by SOM’s Population Health Task Force. Required: Complete web-based epidemiology modules and complete required readings. Submit evaluation form prior to the completion of the rotation. Optional: May observe health policy issues at the state legislature. Supervision and Teaching: Direct supervision by supervising faculty, as well as professionals from the New Mexico Department of Health. Reading assignments and weekly tutorials with student and supervising faculty are held. Evaluation: Predicated upon attendance and performance in tutorials. Web-based epidemiology modules include an evaluation component. Grading system is Credit/No Credit. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. 42
  • 43. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Rural Primary Care in Cuba, New Mexico Course #: CLNS 779 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Tim Garcia, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Family Practice, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Teresa Woodfill 575-289-3291 Goals and Unique Aspects: Develop clinical and research skills integral to rural family practice in a multicultural setting. Learn the complexities, personal and institutional challenges, and special needs of primary care development in a multicultural, rural setting. Objectives: Participate in full spectrum of clinical team activities at Cuba Health Center and Outpost Clinics of Checkerboard Area Health System. Participate in community health projects, community outreach and patient education activities. Participate in rural primary health care development efforts. Responsibilities: Observational: Full spectrum family practice in a multicultural, rural setting. Clinical: Full spectrum family practice in Cuba Health Center or in Checkerboard Area Health System Outpost Clinics on Navajo Reservation. Research: May join ongoing community projects, public health research; may initiate own projects/research with faculty and resident support. Required: Full participation in clinic team activities; direct patient care, community and public health projects, patient education. No night call; weekdays only. Optional: Can carpool with faculty/residents. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Drs. Tim Garcia, and Chacon of Family and Community Medicine (faculty and Family Practice residents on rotation in Cuba). Didactic content: Patient care and community research guided reading. No formal lectures of seminars planned. Evaluation: Based on clinical observation, participation in clinical and possible research activities. Criteria for outstanding grade: Truly outstanding (“exceptional” “above average”) performance in rotation activities. Additional Information: Must have prior departmental and preceptor approval. 43
  • 44. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Health Care for the Homeless Course #: CLNS 780 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Winona Stoltzfus, MD Matias Vega, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Family Practice, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Winona Stoltzfus, MD Matias Vega, MD 505-767-1118 Goals and Unique Aspects: To provide health care for Albuquerque’s homeless population in a multidisciplinary setting. Many unusual and advanced presentations of disease, often complicated by problems of poverty, isolation, addictions and mental illness. Objectives: 1. Assess and treat the usual illnesses seen in the clinic. 2. Consult with a variety of specialists. 3. Participate as a team member. 4. Learn drug, alcohol, mental health and other social services and resources. 5. Appreciate barriers to resources. 6. Participate in community outreach teams, AIDS prevention, needle exchange, domestic violence, teen shelters, etc. Responsibilities: Clinical: 1. Assess and treat the usual illnesses seen in the clinic. 2. Consult with a variety of specialists. 3. Participate as a team member. 4. Learn drug, alcohol, mental health and other social services and resources. 5. Appreciate barriers to resources. 6. Participate in community outreach teams, AIDS prevention, needle exchange, domestic violence, teen shelters, etc. Research: Few ongoing research projects; could possibly be involved in research. Teaching: Practitioners continually discuss patients with each other, providing both teaching and learning opportunities. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Team of Family Practice physicians, specialty physicians, and nurse practitioners always available. Didactic Content: Informal patient-related discussions, reading and semi-monthly in-services. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Based on evaluator’s assessment and nurse practitioners’ input. Student must work at intern level while in clinic. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. This course is only offered during certain blocks. Please contact for more information. 44
  • 45. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Family Medicine Maternal Child Health Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 781 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Lawrence Leeman, MD Sarah Gopman, MD Jennifer Phillips, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Family Practice, OB/GYN and Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Ann Thibodeaux Goals and Unique Aspects: To understand and participate in the care of women and children in the contest of Family Medicine. Objectives: The student will: participate in the care of pregnant women, infants and children in the Model of Family Centered Maternity Care; Participate in the range of reproductive services provided by family physicians including contraceptive counseling, emergency contraception, IUD insertion and removal, vasectomy, first trimester dating ultrasounds, options counseling and medical and surgical abortion services; Participate in the range of pregnancy care including preconception counseling, prenatal care, first trimester dating ultrasound, labor and delivery, cesarean sections, postnatal care in the setting of the family unit. The care of the mother and baby are performed together. Participate in the care of the newborn infant and children with family physicians, who care for pregnant women in prenatal care, the labor and delivery, as well as the care of the newborn infants, and children as they grow and develop. Participate in the care of children in the setting of the family, including normal growth and development, adjustment in the family of the arrival of new children. Participate in the care of at-risk pregnant mothers, newborns and children in a multidisciplinary and comprehensive setting, designed to proved comprehensive care to the mothers and their infants (The Focus Clinic and the Family Practice Center). Participate in the gynecological care of women provided by family physicians, including colposcopy, LEEP, endometrial biopsy, IUD insertion and removal, contraception counseling and emergency contraception. Be able to compare and contrast Family Centered maternity Care, with that of the care of the mother by one set of providers and the infants and children by a different set of providers. Responsibilities: Clinical: Full participation in deliveries, pelvic exam. Research: Possible participation in project. Required: Student will have call every 4-6 day (overnight). Student will function as a subintern. Direct care including H&P, procedure, patient education and follow-up of patient. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by senior faculty. Didactic content: Participate in Tuesday AM Maternal Child Health Seminars, participate in Wednesday AM Repro education sessions. 45
  • 46. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Family Medicine Maternal Child Health Sub-Internship (continued) Course #: CLNS 781 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Lawrence Leeman, MD Sarah Gopman, MD Jennifer Phillips, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Family Practice, OB/GYN and Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Ann Thibodeaux Evaluation: Clinical performance and procedural skills. Criteria for outstanding grade: Participation, demonstrate proficiency with history and physicals, differential procedural skills. Additional Information: Only accepting current UNM Students. Settings: Family Practice Center: Focus Clinic for at risk mother and infants. Options counseling and medical option clinic. UNM Family Health at 1209, First Choice South Valley, First Choice in Los Lunas, UNM Hospital, Cuba PMS Clinic. 46
  • 47. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF FAMILY & COMMUNITY MEDICINE Writing and Healing Course #: CLNS 787 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 8 Faculty Evaluator(s): Julie Reichert, PhD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Julie Reichert, PhD drjulier@comcast.net Goals and Unique Aspects: To enhance “reflectiveness” as a means to better understand self and patients’ experiences. To engage key issues in medicine through the writings of others. To enhance written communication skills. Objectives: Write regularly each week. Complete a piece of writing (narrative, poetry, fiction). Read and discuss assigned books and articles. Responsibilities: Observational: Yourself and your patients. Supervision and Teaching: Two-hour class meetings twice weekly with writer/medical educator Julie Reichert, PhD., and a minimum of two individual conferences with her. Evaluation: On the basis of oral discussion of the readings, and on completion of writing assignments. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Thoughtful response, daily engagement with the writing process, completion of assigned exercises, a completed piece of writing (memoir, story, poems, essay, short play or screenplay) to be publicly presented and/or submitted for publication. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. Writing is a means for expression and communication, a tool for learning and discovery, and a way to meaningfully engage. Readings and structured writing exercises introduce the student to basic writing techniques and literary forms (personal narratives, poetry, fiction, essays). Readings and writing exercises help develop a greater awareness of self and patients by expanding the ability to articulate experiences and ideas. Enhanced self-knowledge, in turn, sharpens the capacity of empathic knowledge and care of patients. The course is an opportunity to address the “art of medicine” through directed work on the craft of writing (getting started, exploration of genres, language use, development of voice, revision strategies), and through a literary examination of the writer/physician as a reflective practitioner. The student is expected to use the clerkship to delve deeply into the writing process by making a daily commitment to writing and reading. 47
  • 48. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. INTERDEPARTMENTAL OFFERING Comprehensive Ambulatory Care Course #: CLNS 605 Credit: Ambulatory Care Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: Minimum 10, Maximum 14 Faculty Evaluator(s): Cynthia Arndell, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Elizabeth Sanchez - UME Goals and Unique Aspects: Provide Phase III students with: advanced clinical ambulatory rotation focused on medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, ethics and professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based care; advanced learning opportunities in public health through seminars, problem sets and projects, and public health clinical sites; advanced learning opportunities in ethics and professionalism through seminars and problem sets; linkage of public health and ethics and professionalism curricula to the clinical portion of rotation; reflective exercises as a learning method based on clinical situation Objectives: Clinical: Each clinical site has general and specific objectives based on ACGME competencies. Ethics: Read and discuss advanced ethics topics, and write on ethics topics related to patients seen at clinical sites. Public Health: Read and discuss advanced public health topics, and reflect and write on public health topics related to patients seen at clinical sites. Spend time in a public health setting. Responsibilities: Students provide direct care for ambulatory care patients, including history and physical exam, lab/tests, management plan, writing an appropriate note, presenting to the attending physician preceptor. Students may participate in outpatient procedures at the preceptor’s discretion. Clinical: See each site description for clinical description. Required: Attend all clinical and seminar sessions. Complete required reading, reflections, projects, write-ups. Supervision and Teaching: Attending faculty supervise residents on rotation. Public health and ethics and professionalism faculty supervise those components of the rotation. Evaluation: PRIME (Professionalism, Reporter, Interpreter, Manager and Educator, Pangaro, et. al.) model used for feedback. Rotation components are weighted in the final grade as follows: Clinical = 40%, Ambulatory Seminars = 40%, Oral Presentation = 10%, Written Presentation = 10%. Additional Information: This required rotation is offered six times during Phase III. Block dates are as follows: 8/23/10-9/19/10, 9/20/10-10/17/10, 10/18/10-11/14/10, 1/10/11-2/6/11, 2/7/11- 3/6/11, 4/4/11-5/1/11. The Ambulatory Care Rotation is a “NO TIME OFF ROTATION.” The seminars in Public Health and Ethics & Professionalism require 100% participation. 48
  • 49. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Hematology Oncology Clinic Course #: CLNS 603 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Ian Rabinowitz, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Medicine Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: An opportunity to deal with complex diseases and issues in an outpatient and inpatient setting. Allows in-depth study of clinical and laboratory aspects of hematology and oncology. Objectives: Plan the work-up and management of patients with abnormal blood counts or those with established diseases of the hematopoietic system. Also, the student should be able to discuss and recommend treatment options for patients with different types of cancer. Understand the role of experimental protocols in the clinical research programs in oncology. The student should feel comfortable dealing with patients and families in the setting of catastrophic illness. Responsibilities: Observational: Procedures (bone marrow biopsy and aspirate, intrathecal chemotherapy, intravenous chemotherapy); interaction with patients, especially those involving discussion of life and death issues. Clinical: Work-up of patients in clinic and for hospital consultations. Each work-up is discussed with the attending. Follow up of patients in the hospital and clinic on a regular basis. In the hospital, the role is that of a consultant working with the primary care-giving team. No weekend call, but weekend rounds as needed. Research: No laboratory research. Many patients are on clinical research protocols and the student is involved in discussion of the protocol studies. Teaching: The student is not expected to take any teaching responsibilities. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Direct contact with attending and fellow. Teaching of clinical nature is usually “one-on-one.” Didactic Content: Weekly conferences within the division, tumor boards, hematopathology conference and protocol meetings. Daily rounds with attending. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: On the basis of interest and ability to understand the general concepts and principle of managing patients with hematology oncology problems. Additional Information: Not available 1/5-2/1. 45 day add/drop strictly enforced. 49
  • 50. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Infectious Disease at Inpatient Course #: CLNS 604 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Corey Tancik, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: To understand the range of problems in infectious disease. Objectives: To develop an approach to the patient with infection and to the field of infectious disease. Responsibilities: Observational: Evaluate patient (under supervision of faculty), make rounds, attend conferences. Clinical: See no fewer than four - five patients per week, 8:00 am - 5:00 pm, Monday - Friday. Research: Clinical studies underway. Teaching: Patient work-ups to be presented to attending faculty. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Faculty and fellow on infectious disease supervise the students. Didactic Content: Lectures, seminars, rounds and structured reading. Evaluation: Observation of students by faculty through daily contact to review the effort, knowledge base, clinical skills in problem identification, and analysis of infectious diseases. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Demonstrate consistently above average effort, talent in problem analysis and superior improvement in knowledge and skills. Additional Information: 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. 50
  • 51. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Internal Medicine at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 606 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deepti Rao, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes (no international students) Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Provide the student with a “hands-on” experience in inpatient internal medicine, with assumption of an increasing degree of authority and responsibility for patient care under close supervision of the ward resident and attending, to simulate the challenges of internship. Objectives: Assess and develop knowledge, skills and professional characteristics in internal medicine, including the ability to function as an “intern.” Responsibilities: Observational: Attendance/participation in a variety of rounds, conferences, etc. Clinical: Student averages 5-7 admissions per week. Average stay: 4 days at UNMH. On call every 4 days. Off day about once per week. Teaching: Responsible for helping to teach Phase II students assigned to the service. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Student “lives” with the ward residents and interns during this rotation. Attending physicians round with the team at least once per day. Currently, subinterns do not stay overnight . Didactic Content: Medical Grand Rounds weekly, noon conference daily, morning report, multiple unscheduled consultations, conferences, etc. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Evaluations are based entirely on direct observations by faculty of the student’s role in care of his/her patients. An “Outstanding” requires performance at the level of an intern in caring for patients and in team participation. Additional Information: Flinders Students accepted. 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. Student must give at least 45 days notice prior to dropping the rotation. Student may be transferred to SUBI at UH, or SUBI at VA, or SUBI in Cardiology at VA as needed by the teams and per the discretion of the chief residents. Student must not have a floated Phase II clerkship scheduled directly after the SUBI due to potential overlap on call days. 51
  • 52. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Geriatric Medicine Course #: CLNS 608 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Suzanne Pinon, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: For students interested in primary care this is an excellent opportunity to learn about caring for our rapidly expanding population of elderly patients. Students learn to evaluate and manage multiple complex medical, functional and psychosocial problems faced by our elderly. Students also learn how to work with multidisciplinary team members such as physicians, nurses, social workers and pharmacists. Objectives: Students attend hospital rounds, geriatrics clinics, home, hospice, and nursing home visits as well as geriatric subspecialty clinics. Students participate in various interdisciplinary conferences where patients are presented and discussed in detail. Students also attend the weekly Geriatric Interest Rounds where General Geriatric topics are presented by fellows, attendings and outside experts. Lastly, students receive a series of six core geriatric lectures and are introduced to a General Geriatric as well as a Hospice and Palliative Medicine core curriculum. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe multidisciplinary team approach to care of frail, elderly patient in hospital setting, outpatient clinic, nursing home, and home care settings. Clinical: Learn to perform complete history and physical exam on elderly patients with multiple medical problems. Assessment screening tools include mini-mental status exam and geriatric depression scale. Learn to determine patient’s ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL’s) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL’s). Research: Introduction to current research endeavors in Department of Geriatrics. Teaching: Present one topic at Geriatric Interest rounds. Considerable opportunity for interaction with health care professionals from other disciplines. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Direct supervision by faculty members in all Interdepartmental Geriatric Medicine Program clinical activities. In addition, the department provides several computer-based teaching programs. Didactic Content: Post clinic case management, nursing home, and geriatric conferences, journal club, and other didactic sessions as arranged. Evaluation: Dr. Suzanne Pinon coordinates evaluations by obtaining feedback from each faculty member having contact with the student. Evaluation based on Student Handbook definition. 52
  • 53. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Occupational and Environmental Health Course Course #: CLNS 609 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2-4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Denece Kesler, MD, MPH Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Learn to incorporate occupational medicine diagnosis and interventions into medical practice including workplace exposure evaluations, diagnosis and treatment of occupational injury and illness, and workers’ compensation, legal, policy and ethical issues. Based in patient care at various occupational medicine clinics A project is required (research or patient education development for the four week elective or a presentation for the two week elective). Objectives: Obtain and interpret occupational and environmental patient histories. Conduct toxicological research on occupational exposures. Become familiar with work site assessments, role of industrial hygienists and other occupational safety specialists, and the workers’ compensation system. Identify components of occupational medicine service, medical surveillance and disability assessment. Understand public health aspects of occupational and environmental health, prevention and policy. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe/practice occupational medical services at various clinics, visit work sites to view industrial hygiene and safety roles, participate in teaching or other prevention interventions. Discuss career options in occupational/environmental preventive medicine and toxicology. Occupational medicine clinics: Dr. Akhshay Sood in the pulmonary clinic, which is held in the sleep study center in Medical Arts; Dr. Denece Kesler, UH Occupational Health Services, 272-2517; ACC5, UNM Employee Occupational Health Services, 272-8043, FPC2; Dr. Pope Moseley, Occupational Pulmonary Disease & Toxicology Clinic, 272-3850, 5 ACC Clinic C. Clinical: Patient responsibilities up to three days a week in clinics such as acute injury care, disability assessment, and medical surveillance. Participate in worksite health and safety evaluations such as ergonomic evaluations, indoor air quality, and chemical exposures. Discuss and present case studies which apply occupational and environmental health and toxicological principles. Research: Conduct toxicology research for patients, or choose one industry or set of exposures to research (for a two week rotation the research requirement is reduced). Teaching: Opportunities to educate workers, off- campus or in UNM departments, in chemical hazard identification, “Right to Know” or specific areas of interest, e.g., noise, back protection, etc. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Weekly meetings. Didactic Content: Core readings and case study material. 53
  • 54. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Occupational and Environmental Health Course (continued) Course #: CLNS 609 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2-4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Denece Kesler, MD, MPH Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Participate in activities that demonstrate breadth of field: patient care and teaching or research project choosing. Complete a mini-report that documents teaching or research. Additional Information: Worksite visits are in a variety of locations on and off campus. 54
  • 55. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Gastroenterology Course #: CLNS 610 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas Ma, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: To expose the student to clinical consultative gastroenterology. Objectives: Take a competent history and physical exam for patients with chief complaints of a GI nature. Gain a detailed knowledge of GI anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. Develop clinical skills, including first-hand observation of GI procedures, and participation in the process of taking diagnostic and therapeutic decisions critical to good patient care. Responsibilities: Observational: Student may elect to observe some GI diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Clinical: Student becomes a member of the GI consult team. He/she sees patient consultations, as well as sees patients in two or three clinics per week. Research: Interested students are encouraged to use this time to identify research interests. Teaching: Student may be asked to present and discuss a case at the weekly clinical GI rounds, but only in exceptional circumstances when the student has played a major role in handling the problem (no student is forced to do this). The student does, however, present and discuss cases daily, during routine ward rounds at both UNMH and VAMC. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: The attending makes rounds several times a week. The student presents cases, formulate diagnosis and plan management under attending supervision. Didactic Content: The student is expected to attend all conferences, a list of which can be obtained from the contact person at UNMH. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: The student is evaluated subjectively by the supervising attending according to the evaluation used by the UNM-SOM. “Outstanding” is awarded to students in the top 5% of those participating in this elective. Additional Information: The student is assigned to UNMH or the VAMC as needed by the teams. 55
  • 56. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Nephrology Course #: CLNS 611 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 3 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mark Rohrscheib, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Provide students with experience in outpatient nephrology including hypertension, acid- base, electrolyte disorders. Also gain experience in managing end stage renal disease maintained on dialysis and renal transplantation. Objectives: Learn ethical, economic and social aspects of end stage renal disease. Learn quality assurance and management in end stage renal disease. Learn acid-base, hypertension, fluid-electrolyte. Learn the process of chronic kidney disease and appropriate interventions. Responsibilities: Observational: Hemo or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplantation. Clinical: Chronic kidney disease clinic. Diabetic nephropathy, cyclosporin nephrotoxity, regulation of endothetin and aldose reductase gene expression. Research: Outcomes research in end stage renal disease. Numerous research opportunities within the division. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Daily rounds with Nephrology faculty and fellows. Didactic Content: Formal curriculum lectures, case discussions, research conferences, journal club. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Excellence in performance, active participation in didactic sessions. Additional Information: Not available 12/8-1/4. 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. Weekly rounds on dialysis patients occur at DCI Albuquerque (Indian School and University) with fellow on UNM service. 56
  • 57. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Pulmonary Medicine Course #: CLNS 612 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Helen Busby, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduces the student to inpatient and outpatient pulmonary medicine; experiences are offered in a variety of settings including wards and outpatient clinics for chest diseases, sleep disorders, lung cancer and allergic diseases. Opportunity also to participate in clinics held throughout the state for miners. A concentrated experience with adults with pulmonary disorders can be achieved. Objectives: Evaluate and manage patients with the most prevalent respiratory disorders. Appropriately utilize pulmonary diagnostic procedures. Interpret routine pulmonary function tests. Gain experience in evaluating chest X-rays and CT scans. Responsibilities: Observational: Opportunity to observe procedures including bronchoscopy, thoracentesis and pleural biopsy. Clinical: Extensive patient contact. The student may attend four outpatient clinics weekly. Evaluate inpatient consultations. Participation in daily rounds in the MICU is optional. Approximately six hours per day is spent in direct patient- related activities. The student shares weekend call with the resident or fellow, two weekends per rotation. Research: Diverse opportunities for research available in ongoing programs in epidemiology, immunology, and sleep disorders. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: The supervision is direct and intense. The fellow reviews all work-ups and all cases are presented to the attending in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Didactic Content: A syllabus is given to each student and additional materials relevant to specific cases are supplied. A weekly case conference covers unusual and informative patients and additional weekly seminar addresses particular subjects in depth. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Awarded largely on the basis of assessment by the attending. The quality of the clinical performance receives the predominant weighting, but conference participation is also considered. Additional Information: Contact the IM Dept for information on dates of availability. 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. 57
  • 58. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Cardiovascular Elective at UNMH Course #: CLNS 614 Credit: Consult Service Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Veena Raizada, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Please Contact for more information Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Enhance skills in the evaluation and management of common cardiovascular disorders in the in and out patient settings. Enhance knowledge of pathophysiology and management of common cardiovascular disorders. Objectives: 1. Accurately diagnose heart disease through history and physical exam. 2. Be able to read routine EKGs. 3. Know basic principles of diagnosis or arrhythmias, CHF, chest pain syndromes. 4. Understand normal CV physiology and how pathophysiologic states result in heart disease. Responsibilities: Observational: Participate in all CV conferences. Clinical: Rounds 1-2 times daily, including one weekend as a rule. See patients in consultation and follow patients on General Medicine, Surgery, and Family Medicine services, under supervision of a faculty, fellow or house staff. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily, direct contact with faculty and fellow. Didactic content: Weekly conferences, “chalk talks” with fellows, residents and faculty. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Exceptional performance and knowledge. Additional Information: The rotation provides a valuable opportunity to serve as a consultant (rather than primary physician) for those services requesting help with the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular conditions. This rotation is not available 12/1-12/28. The 45 day add/drop policy is strictly enforced. 58
  • 59. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Arthritis and the Rheumatic Diseases Course #: CLNS 615 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Arthur Bankhurst, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: The diagnosis and treatment of the rheumatic diseases primarily in an outpatient setting to which medical students usually do not have exposure. Objectives: Diagnoses rheumatic disease, interpret tests unique to rheumatic diseases, and treat rheumatic diseases. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe the varied manifestation of the rheumatic diseases. Clinical: Approximately 20 hours of outpatient clinics, 5 hours of inpatient (consultation) contact. No night or weekend call. Research: Optional. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Constant supervision in inpatient and outpatient settings. Didactic content: A complete review of the Primer of Rheumatic Diseases, a complete examination of the arthritis slide collection and weekly x-ray clinical records. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Assessment by observation. Additional Information: Visiting students require prior approval by Division Chief. Contact IM Dept for information on dates of availability. 45 add/drop policy strictly enforced. 59
  • 60. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Adult Endocrinology and Metabolism Course #: CLNS 616 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Patricia Kapsner, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: To introduce the student to endocrinology. Objectives: Think critically about patient problems. Handle 90% of endocrine problems. Interpret laboratory tests. Responsibilities: Observational: Perform endocrine oriented history and physical examination. Work with the endocrine fellow or resident on the Endocrine Service. Discuss all cases at endocrine rounds. Clinical: Make therapeutic decisions, attend all endocrine clinics at UNMH and VAMC, see all endocrine consults in the hospital, will be called only for interesting patients (no weekend call). Research: None required, but students are encouraged to participate, if desired. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Daily rounds with supervisor, weekly rounds with entire endocrine staff. Didactic Content: No formal lectures. Weekly seminars, daily rounds, suggested reading for all patients as well as the Endocrine Textbook. Program is generally structured to students’ needs. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Depends on participation at clinics, amount of reading done, quality of case presentation at endocrine rounds, quality of consult notes. Additional Information: Contact the IM Dept for information on dates of availability. 45 day add/drop policy is strictly enforced. 60
  • 61. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Sleep Disorders Center Course #: CLNS 619 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Amanda Beck, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: To give the student a thorough introduction to sleep medicine so that he/she recognizes the multi-disciplinary nature of this new field of patient care and evaluate for career planning. Objectives: Learn to evaluate the major sleep complaints. Learn to use diagnostic technology. Relate basic science of sleep to clinical disorders. Responsibilities: Observational: Sleep disorder patients. Clinical: Evaluate new and follow-up patients. Interpret sleep studies. Research: Several projects related to insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless leg syndrome. Teaching: One conference to local sleep specialists. Required: None, however, it is recommended that the student spend one or two “partial nights” in the sleep lab (8:00pm to 2:00am) to observe how polysomnograms are performed. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct faculty and fellow contact in five half day clinics per week. Learning to read polysomnographic records of sleep disorders twice per week. Didactic content: Assorted readings from texts, case conference, journal club. Evaluation: Clinical observations. Criteria fro outstanding grade: Prepare and conduct a one-half hour conference on a sleep disorder topic. Demonstrate ability to evaluate and treat patients with sleep apnea and patients with insomnia. Read and discuss with faculty the pertinent literature of sleep medicine. Additional Information: This rotation is not available during the second week of June or over the Winter Holidays (12/23-1/2) 61
  • 62. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Internal Medicine at VAMC Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 620 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Ed Fancovic, MD Yvonne Dalton-Etheridge. MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes (no international students) Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Provide the student with a “hands-on” experience in inpatient internal medicine, with assumption of an increasing degree of authority and responsibility for patient care under close supervision of the ward resident and attending, to simulate the challenges of internship. Objectives: Assess and develop knowledge, skills and professional characteristics in internal medicine, including the ability to function as an “intern.” Responsibilities: Observational: Attendance/participation in a variety of rounds, conferences, etc. Clinical: Student averages 5-7 admissions per week. Average stay: 4 days at VAMC. On call every 4 days. Off day about once per week. Teaching: Responsible for helping to teach Phase II students assigned to the service. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Student “lives” with the ward residents and interns during this rotation. Attending physicians round with the team at least once per day. Currently, subinterns stay overnight . Didactic Content: Medical Grand Rounds weekly, noon conference daily, morning report, multiple unscheduled consultations, conferences, etc. The Sub-I IM curriculum guide can be found on the IM website. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Evaluations are based entirely on direct observations by faculty of the student’s role in care of his/her patients. An “Outstanding” requires performance at the level of an intern in caring for patients and in team participation. Competency based criteria for evaluation will be given to student. Additional Information: Flinders Students accepted. 45 day add/drop policy strictly enforced. Student must give at least 45 days notice prior to dropping the rotation. Student may be transferred to SUBI at UH, or SUBI at VA, or SUBI in Cardiology at VA as needed by the teams and per the discretion of the chief residents. Student must not have a floated Phase II clerkship scheduled directly after the SUBI due to potential overlap on call days. 62
  • 63. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Medicine Intensive Care at UNMH Course #: CLNS 622 Credit: Intensive Care Unit Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 3 Faculty Evaluator(s): MICU Team Harkins, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes, if fewer than 2 UNM Students scheduled Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduction to intensive care medicine; experiences offered in pulmonary, cardiology, gastrointestinal, infectious disease and multiple organ dysfunction. A concentrated experience and acquisition of invasive skills achieved under close supervision. Objectives: Evaluate patients with the most prevalent life threatening organ dysfunction. Manage routine ventilator care, perform most procedures of venous and arterial access, intubate patients, obtain and interpret hemodynamic data. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe and participate in procedures including intubation, arterial and pulmonary artery catheterization and central catheter placement. Clinical: Extensive patient contact. Daily rounds in MICU. Approximately 8 hrs per day spent in direct patient related activity. Night and weekend call shared with residents. Research: Opportunities available in ongoing MICU patient care or research protocols and quality assurance programs. Teaching: Morning MICU rounds are primarily educational. Daily teaching on intensive care core curriculum topics is provided. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Fellow or R2/R3 together with attending MD. Constant supervision provided for all procedures and decisions on these critically ill patients. Didactic Content: Daily teaching rounds and discussion of core curriculum. Weekly departmental seminars. Combined critical care curriculum weekly. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Ability to distill clinical and laboratory data, generate a list of possible diagnoses and institute appropriate management. Performance must be equal to first-year house officer. Additional Information: 45 day add/drop policy is strictly enforced. Once a commitment has been made, you must give at least 45 days notice to drop the rotation. Floated Phase II clerkship must not be scheduled after this rotation due to potential overlap of call days. 63
  • 64. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Infectious Disease Outpatient Course #: CLNS 623 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Elaine Thomas, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: To study infectious diseases in outpatient settings. Objectives: Understand basic pathophysiology, natural history and management of HIV. Assess risks for HIV transmission and counsel patients on risk reduction. Understand ethical, social, psychological, legal aspects of HIV and importance of ancillary services in managing HIV (model for management of serious chronic illness). Understand safe, effective outpatient use of parenteral antibiotics. Recognize epidemiology and clinical presentation of STD and how they are controlled in collaboration with public health. Observe outpatient management of tuberculosis and cystic fibrosis. Integrate knowledge of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, management, and social aspects of these diseases. Responsibilities: Observational: Participate in clinical care of outpatients in various settings. Clinical: Interview, examine, and assess clinic patients and discus with attending faculty. Required: Attend clinics in HIV, STD, Tuberculosis, Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy, Cystic Fibrosis, and other clinical experiences, plus infectious disease conferences, plus outside reading, Schedule is planned by student and faculty coordinator. No night or weekend call. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct by faculty physicians in clinics. Some teaching by ancillary staff. Didactic content: Packet of readings and resources provided. The student is expected to do further reading and discuss with faculty. Evaluation: Faculty observation of student’s clinical skills, self-education, synthesis of reading and clinical experience, and progress towards goals identified with faculty coordinator. Additional Information: Some clinics are off-campus (within 2 miles of UNMH). The Office of Education must check with faculty coordinator to be sure slot is available. Trainee must work with faculty coordinator to arrange schedule in advance. Students may not add the course less than 4 weeks before rotation. Course is not available during the block nearest the winter holidays. 64
  • 65. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Alternative and Complementary Medicine Course #: CLNS 685 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Arti Prasad, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Internal Medicine Office of Education Goals and Unique Aspects: An experimental approach to integrative medicine, tailored to individual student needs to introduce healing techniques complementary to allopathic medicine. It is an opportunity to explore all four aspects of human health: physical, mental, spiritual and social. Objectives: Students can gain an understanding of the range of healing options available to patients i.e. homeopathy, herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage, etc. Students can also attain a sense of the historical development of these fields in relation to allopathic medicine. In addition, students, may explore the barriers to attaining care in these systems. Student may also focus their experience in one area, e.g. phytotherapy or pain management. Responsibilities: It is very important to contact Dr. Prasad before registering for this elective. Contact the Clerkship Coordinator to arrange to do so. Students are responsible for establishing personal goals for the rotation and arranging schedules with practitioners from an established list available from the faculty evaluator. The faculty evaluator and the student agree on the format of the rotation, and the method of recording and reporting the results of the rotation. Supervision and Teaching: Individual meetings with the faculty advisor on a weekly basis will help provide direction and support. Evaluation: Evaluation is individually tailored based on agreement between the faculty advisor and the student. The student is expected to provide a written analysis and summary of their experience during the elective. Additional Information: Available to externs. Rotation offered off-site, therefore, personal transportation is a must. 65
  • 66. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Radiation Oncology Course #: CLNS 881 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas Schroeder, MD Prerequisites: Completion of Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Laura Jaramillo Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduction to radiation oncology and cancer patient care. Objectives: Basic introduction to radiation oncology, physics and biology and involvement in patient care. Responsibilities: Observational: Teletherapy, brachytherapy, consultations, daily management of radiation patients. Clinical: Involved in consultations, and presents to attending. Involved in patient education on radiation therapy and side effects. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: One-on-one teaching by clinical associate professor with direct feedback. Didactic Content: Some readings required. No didactic lectures. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on clinical performance, patient care, and attitude toward the specialty and the staff. Criteria for outstanding grade: Must demonstrate great enthusiasm and work beyond the expected level. Additional Information: Students may go to other cancer centers for observation of special procedures within Albuquerque. 66
  • 67. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 701 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Gary Rosenberg, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Goals and Unique Aspects: To learn the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of common neurologic disease through caring for inpatients and outpatients and being an integral part of the neurology team. To learn the physiologic basis for common neurologic diagnostic tests such as lumbar puncture, CT, MRI, EEG and EMG. Responsibilities: As part of the Neurology team, the student will work with senior neurology residents and attending faculty neurologists in the work up and management of inpatients and outpatients. Students will be responsible for managing (under the supervision of the senior resident and attending) up to five inpatients with neurologic diseases and attending one teaching neurology outpatient clinic per week. Students will be expected to attend all regularly scheduled neurology conferences. Supervision and Teaching: Students will be taught and supervised by the senior ward neurology resident, the inpatient neurology attending and the clinic teaching attending neurologist. Teaching conferences occur daily and vary. At daily attending rounds, the student will present his/her patients to the staff neurologist and discuss the diagnosis, work up and management. Formal teaching conferences will include Grand Rounds, Neuroradiology Conferences, Neuropathology Conferences, Pediatric Neurology Conferences and Basic Neuroscience Conferences. Students will be expected to read about common neurologic diseases and the diseases of their patients. Training and supervision in performance of a lumbar puncture will be done with the neurology senior resident. Evaluation: Grading will be based on: 1. quality of patient care. 2. knowledge of patients’ diseases and common neurologic diseases. 3. participation in teaching conferences. 67
  • 68. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Spinal Cord Injury [SCI] at VAMC Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 702 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Kurt J. Fiedler, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Goals and Unique Aspects: To enable student to participate in multi-disciplinary general and rehabilitative inpatient care for a population defined by the biographical accident of having a spinal cord injury or disease, such as multiple sclerosis. This includes acute rehabilitation following the injury, as well as preventive out-patient care, “sustaining care” (care of subsequent illnesses including those not directly related to SCI but requiring hospitalization), and planning and maintenance of community integration. Objectives: The student will provide care ranging from the specialized requirements of patients affected by the pathophysiology of SCI, to the general primary care of their ongoing medical needs, understand the short and long-term direct effects of paralysis and deafferentation, and the indications for associated medical and psychosocial treatments, appreciate the effects of SCI on unrelated common medical illnesses, learn the scope of physical, occupational, and communicative therapies, and participates in multi- disciplinary planning and treatment. Responsibilities: Observational: Follow own patients to communication, physical and occupational therapies. Observe specialized clinics: GU/urodynamics, wheel-chair/eating clinic, driver training, pool therapy, etc. Clinical: Extensive patient contact on twenty bed unit. Initial patient assessment (history, physical, order-writing) and continued care of patients with acute illnesses and those admitted electively for comprehensive annual evaluations. Ongoing involvement in multi-disciplinary assessment and planning meetings. Participation in general SCI out-patient clinic. Rotate evening and weekend call (beeper) with direct supervision by attending physicians. Research: Student may become involved in ongoing bench and clinical research. Recent projects include nosocomial transmission of MRSA, thermoregulation after SCI, and outcomes of periodic evaluation. Supervision and Teaching: Focused student teaching and direct supervision is provided daily by the attending physicians: Dr. M. Puerzer and Dr. B. Porter, both boarded in Internal medicine and Infectious Diseases, and Dr. Friedler, boarded in Neurology and Family Medicine. Students work with physician assistants and gain insight into the supervisory role, and, in turn, are educated by the expertise. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on achievement of the individual goals established jointly by the student and attending at the start of the rotation. 68
  • 69. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Neurology at VAMC Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 703 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Molly King, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Goals and Unique Aspects: To learn the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of common neurologic disease through caring for inpatients and outpatients and being an integral part of the neurology team. To learn the physiologic basis for common neurologic diagnostic tests such as lumbar puncture, CT, MRI, EEG and EMG. Responsibilities: As part of the Neurology team, the student will work with senior neurology residents and attending faculty neurologists in the work up and management of inpatients and outpatients. Students will be responsible for managing (under the supervision of the senior resident and attending) up to five inpatients with neurologic diseases and attending one teaching neurology outpatient clinic per week. Students will be expected to attend all regularly scheduled neurology conferences. Supervision and Teaching: Students will be taught and supervised by the senior ward neurology resident, the inpatient neurology attending and the clinic teaching attending neurologist. Teaching conferences occur daily and vary. At daily attending rounds, the student will present his/her patients to the staff neurologist and discuss the diagnosis, work up and management. Formal teaching conferences will include Grand Rounds, Neuroradiology Conferences, Neuropathology Conferences, Pediatric Neurology Conferences and Basic Neuroscience Conferences. Students will be expected to read about common neurologic diseases and the diseases of their patients. Training and supervision in performance of a lumbar puncture will be done with the neurology senior resident. Evaluation: Grading will be based on: 1. quality of patient care. 2. knowledge of patients’ diseases and common neurologic diseases. 3. participation in teaching conferences. 69
  • 70. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Child Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 704 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mary Johnson, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Neurology Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Goals and Unique Aspects: At the end of this rotation, the student should be able to: Orally present their patients’ history and physical completely and concisely; Accurately localize and discuss the localization of their patients’ neurological problems; Formulate reasonable differential diagnoses; Generate management plans; Demonstrate consistent longitudinal daily care of their patient, including anticipatory preparation for discharge; Read peer reviewed journals relating to the diagnosis and/or treatment of their patients; List the typical presenting symptoms and history, neurological findings, management approach/treatment, and prognosis for the following conditions: Epilepsy of childhood including neonatal seizures, infantile spasm, febrile convulsions, childhood absence, benign Rolandic epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, Childhood migraine, Guillain Barre Syndrome, Transverse myelitis, Neurological complications of fetal alcohol exposure, Common genetic disorders and their neurological complications, Tourette’s Syndrom, Hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation; Gain familiarity with CT and MRI imaging changes associated with the above neurological conditions. Responsibilities: As part of the neurology team, the student will work with senior neurology residents and attending faculty child neurologists in the work up and management of inpatients (UNM Children’s Hospital) and outpatients (Clinical Neuroscience Center). Students will be responsible for managing (under the supervision of the senior resident and attending) up to four inpatients with neurologic diseases, and attending two to three child neurology outpatient clinics per week. Students will be expected to attend all regularly scheduled neurology conferences. Formal Teaching conferences include weekly grand rounds, Neuroradiology/neuropathology conference, Child Neurology Conference and professor rounds. Students will be expected to read about common neurologic diseases and the disorders of their patients. Along with the child neurology team (residents and attendings) the student will be involved in the teaching of the Phase II clerkship students on the service. Supervision and Teaching: Students will be taught and supervised by the senior consult neurology residents, the inpatient child neurology attending and the clinic attending child neurologist. At daily attending rounds, the student will present his/her patients to the attending child neurologist and discuss the diagnosis, work up and management. Training and supervision in performance of a lumbar puncture will be done by neurology residents. 70
  • 71. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Child Neurology at UNMH Sub-Internship (continued) Course #: CLNS 704 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mary Johnson, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Neurology Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Evaluation: The student will be evaluated using the PRIME format, including competence in professionalism and as a reporter, interpreter, manager, and educator. The student who demonstrates above that expected for a 4th year student in all areas will meet the criteria for the grade “Outstanding”. This requires dependability in attendance for rounds and conferences, well-taken and orally presented histories, the ability to obtain and present the examination (general and neurological) in all age groups of children and the demonstration of logical thinking beginning with localization through the most likely diagnosis, and best management approaches all of which are dependent on an above expected base knowledge. Simply put, an outstanding would require a student demonstrate a first year resident level performance. 71
  • 72. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY Neurology Research Course #: CLNS 705 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4-12 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Gary Rosenberg, MD Prerequisites: Molecular biology or small animal physiology Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Barbara Jackson Goals and Unique Aspects: This is an in depth exposure to research on neurological diseases. Molecular mechanisms of brain injury are studied in animal models of stroke and trauma. The student will learn concepts in mechanism of brain injury that will be useful for a career in the neurosciences. Objectives: The objectives are determined between the student and the mentor. These could range from an extensive research report based on review of the current literature to a small focused research project. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe laboratory methods in neurobiology. Clinical: Analysis of proteolytic enzymes in CSF. Research: Projects on proteolytic enzymes in brain injury. Optional: Experience in biochemical or physiological studies. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: laboratory personnel and Dr. Rosenberg. Didactic content: Neuroscience seminars, neurology conferences, laboratory meetings. Evaluation: Based on work in the laboratory and report. Criteria for outstanding grade: Quality of research paper. 72
  • 73. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSCIENCES Neuroscience Teaching Course #: CLNS 707 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 or 8 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2-4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Linda C. Saland, PhD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Neurology or Psychiatry Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Linda C. Saland, PhD Goals and Unique Aspects: To become proficient as a Phase I facilitator in neuroscience. To enhance knowledge base in basic neurobiology related to medicine. Objectives: To participate in Phase I neuroscience tutorials as a co-tutor with faculty tutors. Alternatives: To participate in laboratory teaching of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology to first year medical students. Responsibilities: Teaching: Students observe Phase I tutorials. They are required to co-tutor. Neuroanatomy/neurophysiology labs: students work together with faculty teaching the labs to assist medical students. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Students are supervised directly by faculty in tutorials for first year medical students. Didactic content: Students are assigned in-depth reading and review of neuroscience basic biology. For neuroanatomy/neurophysiology labs: students are directly supervised by faculty. Evaluation: Students are assessed by faculty tutors. They are also responsible to self-assess in all areas. Criteria for outstanding grade: Attend assigned Phase I tutorials and demonstrate ability to facilitate and interact in a constructive, mature fashion, at the level of a graduate assistant. Students in lab teaching will be assessed by faculty in those teaching labs. Additional Information: Time required per week is six hours, Mondays 9am-12pm, and 12pm-1pm for case review, and Wednesdays 10am-12pm. This rotation is only available during the Phase I Neuroscience Block. For neuroanatomy and/or neurophysiology labs: Time required: 2 hours X 2 sessions per lab for 4 or 5 labs (neuroanatomy), 2 hours X 2 sessions per lab for 1 or 2 labs (neurophysiology). 73
  • 74. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF NEUROSURGERY Neurosurgery at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 753 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Howard Yonas, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pat Cleve Goals and Unique Aspects: To learn the neurological exam, management of head and spinal cord in juries, management of low back pain, and interpretation of neuro-imaging studies. Objectives: To perform a detailed neurological exam tailored to the patient’s symptoms and be able to formulate a working diagnosis and treatment plan. Responsibilities: Observational: Work-up admissions, present cases on rounds, select one topic for review and presentation. Clinical: Admit one to two patients per day, participate in night call once every three days, be an integral part of the care team. Research: Students may elect to become involved in neurosurgical research which includes biomechanics of spinal instrumentation and magnetic source imaging. Teaching: Examination of inpatients presented to chief resident and outpatients presented to attending. Required: Mandatory weekday attendance on surgery and in clinics, Journal Club and Friday conferences. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by attendings and residents. Didactic content: Daily rounds; conferences twice per week. Evaluation: Evaluation by Howard Yonas, MD. Criteria for outstanding grade: Based on performance and review of a topic. Quality of work-ups, ability to sustain work level, performance in operating room and oral presentation. Additional Information: Student obtains a great deal of practical exposure, assisting on complex cases, suturing and other procedures appropriate to interests and capabilities. 74
  • 75. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Ambulatory Gynecology Course #: CLNS 652 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Kathleen Kennedy, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: Increase knowledge of ambulatory gynecology. Objectives: Increase depth of knowledge of ambulatory gynecology and procedures; continue to develop skills in diagnosis and management. Responsibilities: Observational: Problems and procedures in ambulatory gynecology. Clinical: patient evaluation and examination; perform pregnancy tests, wet smears, cultures, Pap tests under supervision. Perform procedures under supervision. Research: May participate in ongoing department research. Teaching: By faculty and residents. Conferences: Colposcopy – Tuesday and Wednesday AM; Grand Rounds – Friday AM; M&M – Friday PM. Required: Monday-Friday clinic and conferences; attend assigned gynecology clinics and subspecialty clinics (colposcopy, urogynecology). No overnight call. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervised by faculty and residents. Evaluation: Clinical observations of knowledge and improvement of skills. Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding clinical evaluations and a brief oral presentation. Additional Information: Priority for scheduling the Benign Gyn and Ambulatory Gyn rotations will be given to those requesting Benign Gyn Sub-I from July-January. Prior authorization is required. An add/drop slip must be completed to add this course to your schedule. 75
  • 76. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Gynecologic Oncology Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 653 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Carolyn Muller, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: This rotation will provide its student the unique opportunity of comprehensive care for the Gynecologic Cancer patient. This student will actively participate in techniques of diagnosis and cancer treatment, including surgical management, radiation therapy, chemo therapy and palliative care. In addition, the student will learn techniques in delivering bad news and end of life transitioning. Also, risk assessment and cancer prevention strategies will be taught. Objectives: The primary objective is to learn globally about the field of Gyn Oncology and the common sense approach to caring for women with gynecologic malignancies. At the end of the rotation, the student should be able to understand the primary principles of cancer care, goals of therapy, and quality of life issues related to therapy and compassionate care to the dying patient. Students should also understand the general facts about the main gynecologic malignancies including ovarian, cervical and endometrial cancer and understand risk factors, screening modalities, prevention modalities, diagnostic workup and general basics for treating these malignancies. Responsibilities: This is a vigorous but rewarding clinical rotation. The student will act at the sub-intern level under the direct supervision of senior residents and the faculty. The student is expected to participate as a full member of the Gyn Oncology team and will have increasing technical experiences as the rotation and individual competency progresses. The student will be assigned inpatients and will be expected to make daily rounds, collect data and interpret and formulate treatment plans. In addition, students will experience outpatient services and will be taught techniques such as diagnostic colposcopy tumor biopsies and proper preoperative workup of the patient with an anticipated gynecologic malignancy. Students will also be taught dictation skills for both inpatient and outpatient services. Call: Once weekly (Thursday or Friday). Some weekend rounding experience is strongly suggested. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: The student will be supervised at all times by either a resident and/or faculty Gyn Oncologist. All invasive procedures including pelvic exams, biopsies or any technical procedures will be directly supervised by senior resident or faculty physicians. All treatment plans will be discussed with the team orders and notes will be written by the student and co-signed by the resident and/or faculty. Didactic Content: Most of the didactics occur during the day-to-day operation of the service. These will include daily ward rounds, clinic sessions, weekly tumor board conferences, Friday morning grand 76
  • 77. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Gynecologic Oncology Sub-Internship [continued] Course #: CLNS 653 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Carolyn Muller, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Shawne Riley rounds and monthly M & M conferences. Students may be asked to present a topic for review and would discuss the aspects for a surgical case either prior to or while in the operating room. This strongly suggests the pelvic anatomy be reviewed prior to this course. We anticipate the learning curve to rise exponentially Evaluation: Student will be evaluated by residents and faculty. Similarly to the criteria of resident evaluation this is based on observational assessment. The student should strive to excel on all aspects including knowledge based technical skills, data recovery and analysis, teamwork, communication skills, understanding of anatomy and general principles of oncology. Additional Information: If any student wishes for additional information, do not hesitate to contact Dr. Muller at 272-0185 or via email at cmuller@salud.unm.edu. 77
  • 78. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Maternal Fetal Medicine at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 654 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): William Rayburn, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: Acquaint the student with diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and decision strategies in the management of complicated pregnancies. Objectives: Achieve a substantial level of competence in identifying and managing high risk pregnancies. Responsibilities: Clinical: Function as sub-intern for Perinatal High Risk Service. Responsible for high-risk obstetrics patients both in-house and in the clinic during the day. Expect to see a variety of low and high risk patients. Attending rounds are at 7:30 AM. On average, the student performs at least three work-ups of inpatients per week. Student takes one call per week during the rotation on Thursday or Friday. Research: For students with special interests, the opportunity to participate in ongoing clinical research of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Division can be made available. Call: Once weekly (Thursday or Friday). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: All pelvic exams are supervised, all fetal tracings reviewed, and all management plans reviewed and evaluated. Didactic Content: MFM rounds daily. Diabetic conference every Tuesday and high risk clinic conference every Thursday. Ultrasound conference every Monday. Perinatal conference every Thursday. Friday morning Grand Rounds and M & M Conferences. Required reading includes parts of Williams Obstetrics and articles appropriate to patients on the service. Students present topics and make patient presentations during daily rounds. Evaluation: Grading is based upon clinical performance. Additional Information: The UNM High Risk Obstetrics Services see a tremendous variety of obstetric complications, ranging from preterm labor and ruptured membranes, to serious, life threatening maternal and fetal complications, including severe fetal anomalies, maternal health problems from heart disease to leukemia to myasthenia gravis, and a substantial volume of Class C through R diabetics and complex, severe pre-eclampsia. This referral service treats a substantial proportion of all of the high risk pregnancies in the state of New Mexico. 78
  • 79. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Maternal and Child Health in Guatemala Course #: CLNS 655 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Lawrence Leeman, MD Eve Espey, MD Prerequisites: See Additional Information Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: To experience the realities of delivering maternal/child/women’s health in a developing country. Objectives: To enhance clinical skills in OB/GYN, improve Spanish language skills, and participate in a population based project related to maternal/child health. Responsibilities: Observational: OB/GYN-Neonatal Care in a developing nation setting. Clinical: Enhancement of clinical/physical diagnosis skills in a setting with minimal technologic back-up services. Research: Effect of traditional birth attendant training on maternal/neonatal mortality. Barriers to access of care in rural Guatemala. Teaching: Interact/teach/role model with 5th and 6th year Guatemalan medical students. Required: Rounds, conferences, at least one 24 hour call at least once per week. Optional: Explore Guatemala! Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: By Guatemalan faculty/residents in OB/GYN. Sergio Flores, MD, is the preceptor in Guatemala. Didactic Content: Daily morning conferences. If Spanish language improvement is needed, attend one of 39 Spanish language schools in Quetzaltenango. Evaluation: Based on evaluation by faculty and written report/project after return. Criteria for outstanding grade: Quality of project/report and evaluation of faculty. Additional Information: Preferably have completed all of Phase II, but will consider if Phase II Ob/Gyn, Medicine, and Pediatrics are complete. Fluency in basic Spanish is required. Student must cover all travel and living expenses. Need to consult UNM travel medicine clinic for required vaccinations. Must contact UNM Office of International Programs and Studies (main campus) for foreign travel insurance and safety issues discussion. U.S. passport required (tourist visa obtained at airport). See department for suggested reading list. 79
  • 80. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Maternal Fetal Medicine in Sierra Leone Course #: CLNS 659 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): TBD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: OBGYN Goals and Unique Aspects: To experience and understand the difference in the provision of medical care in an underdeveloped country and its impact on maternal and fetal health. Objectives: To participate in a project related to maternal-fetal health. To become familiar with models of health care delivery different from the United States model. Responsibilities: Observational: Obstetric/Gynecologic care in a developing country. Required Research: Student project. Teaching: The first week of the course will consist of sessions with the preceptor to design a student project. Supervision and Teaching: Supervision by the course director and nursing staff on the outreach team. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: For an outstanding grade the student must demonstrate the ability to work with the outreach team, but also be able to coordinate and manage a student project. Additional Information: Please contact the OBGYN Dept for specific dates. Student must cover all travel and living expenses. Need to consult UNM travel clinic for required vaccinations. Must contact UNM Office of Itnernational Programs and Students for foreign travel, insurance and saftey information. United States Passport is requried. This course will only be offerend in 2011. 80
  • 81. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Benign Gynecology at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 656 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Kathleen Kennedy, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: Increase knowledge of benign gynecology. Objectives: Increase depth of knowledge of benign gynecology, procedures and surgeries; continue to develop skills in diagnosis and management. Responsibilities: The student will act at the sub-intern level under direct supervision of senior residents and faculty. The student is expected to participate as a full member of the benign gynecology team. Responsibilities include: being assigned inpatients, making daily rounds and presentations, formulating treatment plans, writing orders (with co- signature), and managing and coordinating all aspects of the patient’s care during the hospitalization with assistance from residents and faculty. The student will see patients in the outpatient clinic two full days a week and will be taught dictation skills. Additionally, the student will participate in benign gynecology operations and procedures two full days a week. Observational: Problems and procedures in ambulatory gynecology, gynecologic surgery. Clinical: Inpatient and outpatient evaluation and examinations; perform pelvic exams, wet preps, cultures, Pap tests, and gynecology procedures under supervision. Research: May participate in ongoing department research. Teaching: By faculty and residents. Conferences: Colposcopy – Tuesday and Wednesday; Grand Rounds – Friday AM; M&M/Residents’ School – Friday PM. Required: Tuesday and Wednesday gynecology clinics and conferences; Monday and Thursday OR. Inpatient rounds daily with some weekend rounding Saturday and Sunday. Call: Once weekly (Thursday or Friday). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Supervised by faculty and residents. Didactic Content: Tuesday and Wednesday colposcopy conferences, Friday PM didactic sessions. Evaluation: Clinical Observations of knowledge and improvement of skills. Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding clinical evaluations and a brief oral presentation. Additional Information: Recommended for students seriously considering OB/GYN residency. Priority for scheduling the Benign Gyn and Ambulatory Gyn rotations will be given to those requesting Benign Gyn Sub-I from July-January. 81
  • 82. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS General Orthopaedic Surgery Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 850 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Robert Quinn, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Joni Roberts Goals and Unique Aspects: To participate as an active member of the surgical team, delivering care to patients with musculoskeletal problems, especially trauma. Objectives: Learn to dramatically influence outcome of patients with musculoskeletal disease states by direct operative and non-operative intervention. Perform procedures, with appropriate supervision, which help patients improve their health. Responsibilities: Observational: While contributing at a student level, observe higher levels of care giving (residents, attendings) in clinic, wards, and operating room. Required: Night call, conference attendance, rounds, clinic and operating room assistance. Optional: Clinical research (case report of interesting case). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Instruction directly by role model; principal role on ward. Didactic Content: Attend all department conferences. Evaluation: Consensus subjective conclusion of team attendings and residents. Written exam possible. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Demonstrate knowledge of anatomy and clinical skills; demonstrate excellent acquisition of basic orthopaedic musculoskeletal diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge. Actively and effectively participate in surgical team (rounds, wards clinics, operating room). Excellence in conference participation, to include presentation of cases of patients with musculoskeletal pathology, which demonstrate extensive knowledge of the condition and treatment alternatives. 82
  • 83. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Pediatric Orthopaedics at Carrie Tingley Hospital Course #: CLNS 851 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Elizabeth A. Szalay, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Jude McMullan Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduction to various aspects and principles of the musculoskeletal system in the growing child with emphasis on modeling professional and ethical approach to pediatric patient and family. Objectives: 1. Learn the principles of normal development. 2. Understand common congenital, developmental, neuromuscular and trauma conditions. 3. Properly obtain a relevant history. 4. Perform a musculoskeletal physical examination. 5. Discuss a simple and specific differential diagnosis. 6. Demonstrate proficiency in simple orthopaedic techniques, including: suturing, splinting, assisting in the operating room, and reading radiographs and imaging studies. 7. Understand the basic ethical principles of informed patient consent. Responsibilities: Observational: Pediatric orthopaedics in clinic, inpatient and operating room environments. Clinical: Assist in clinic and on wards in routine care of patients. Assist in operating room and emergency department. Research: Ongoing optional clinical and basic science research projects available. Teaching: Patient teaching in clinic at your level of experience. One didactic presentation, and case presentations during Monday morning pre-operative conference are required. Required: One weekday night call per week and one weekend call (total of six calls during the one month rotation). Work directly with, and under the supervision of the orthopaedic resident while on call. Call is not busy and can be taken from home. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Learning objectives discussed at beginning of rotation. Direct supervision. Clinical cases presented to orthopaedic residents and attendings. Hands on treatment with supervision. Didactic Content: 1. Rotation specific reading list and learning objectives. 2. Readings on performing a history and physical examination. 3. Audio visual CD and Power-point presentations available. 4. Literature search and relevant article readings (3) before any surgical case. 5. Assigned literature searches for unusual clinic cases. 6. Attend all pediatric orthopaedic conferences. Present at the Monday morning preoperative conference. 7. Present one Friday morning case to the Orthopaedic Department. 8. Present one didactic conference during the rotation. A historical talk is recommended. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on integrity, punctuality, and achievement of the rotation goals and learning objectives. Student is observed and questioned about required reading. A written or oral examination is given at the end of the rotation. CTH Medical Director, Chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics, attending staff and orthopaedic residents all have input 83
  • 84. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Pediatric Orthopaedics at Carrie Tingley Hospital (continued) Course #: CLNS 851 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Elizabeth A Szalay, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Jude McMullan to the final grade. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Consistent performance of items noted above. Successful participation in, and completion of a research project is helpful, but not necessary for achieving an outstanding grade. Additional Information: Research projects are available, and require a firm commitment by the student and supervision and mentoring by one of the pediatric orthopaedic attending staff members. Outreach clinics throughout New Mexico, cast room and brace shop are various aspects of this elective. 84
  • 85. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Orthopaedic Trauma Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 852 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas DeCoster, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Joni Roberts Goals and Unique Aspects: Learn the appropriate anatomy, physiology, and exam skills needed to participate in the care of orthopaedic trauma patients, including multiple trauma and isolated fractures. Objectives: Learn initial management of patients with acute traumatic injury including history, physicals, resuscitation and treatment of open and closed fractures, soft tissue injury, casting techniques, and introductory reduction techniques. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe and participate in all aspects patient care including emergency room and trauma call, inpatient and postoperative care, out-patient clinics and surgical interventions. Clinical: Participate in inpatient daily rounds; assist with and observe surgery two days per week. Various orthopaedic subspecialty clinics three days per week. Research: May participate in ongoing research projects. Teaching: Present cases at formal orthopaedic department conferences. Case presentation to the attending physician in clinic, and interoperative teaching are provided. Required: Act as subintern, assuming primary responsibility for patients, both inpatient and ambulatory set-tings, include early patient contact, history and physical examinations, problem lists and diagnostic/therapeutic plans. Participate in perioperative and postoperative management of patients, including following patient to operating room, evaluating patients and writing notes on rounds twice a day, and following patient progress during follow-up visits. Overnight call required every third night. Under supervision of an attending physician and/or resident at all times. Optional: Opportunity to see patients in all orthopaedic subspecialties at UNMH, Carrie Tingley Hospital and VAMC. Evaluation: Multifactoral by attending physicians and chief residents. Areas evaluated are knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy; ability to obtain focused history and physical exam; complete medical documentation and interpretation of radiographs and other tests; ability to give accurate; concise, presentations to senior level residents and attendings and participate as member of surgical team on rounds, wards, clinics, and operating room. All criteria evaluated equally; primary emphasis placed on physical examination of the musculoskeletal system. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Consistently prepared for surgical cases with excellent knowledge of relevant surgical anatomy, indications and contraindications for surgery and rational for surgical interventions; regularly provide evidence of ability to integrate information from resident conferences, selected readings and current literature, clinical patient encounters and surgical cases; demonstrate evidence based, logical treatment based on texts and current literature; demonstrate comprehension of both natural disease course and methods of treatment of common 85
  • 86. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Orthopaedic Trauma Sub-Internship (continued) Course #: CLNS 852 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas DeCoster, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Joni Roberts Evaluation (continued): clinical conditions; make effective and complete clinical case presentations at the preoperative or resident conference; demonstrate superior skills in physical examination of the musculoskeletal system including special tests related to patients encountered on the service. 86
  • 87. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Hand Surgery Course #: CLNS 853 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Moheb Moneim, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Joni Roberts Goals and Unique Aspects: To participate as an active member of the hand surgical team, delivering care to patients with hand surgery problems including trauma, arthritis and other reconstructive problems. Objectives: To learn to examine a hand and be exposed to common disorders of the hand in a clinic setting, in the operating room and follow-up in the office. Responsibilities: Observational: In clinic setting, operating room and inpatient setting. Required: Attendance in clinics, operating room and at conferences. Optional: Night call and research. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Senior faculty and hand fellows 75%, residents 25%. Didactic Content: Text available in the library and attendance at all hand surgery conferences. Evaluation: At the end of the rotation, evaluation will be according to knowledge base and participation in various patient care activities. 87
  • 88. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Orthopaedic Spine Clinical Experience Course #: CLNS 854 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Robert Quinn, MD Andrew Paterson, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Joni Roberts Goals and Unique Aspects: To instruct medical students, particularly those interested in family practice, in evaluation, diagnosis and care of spine injured patients. Objectives: To teach interested students to approach a “spine” patient. Responsibilities: Observational: Learn to do “low back” history and physical. Learn to evaluate X-rays, CT and MRI scans. Research: Optional. Teaching: Present an informal talk on an assigned spine topic appropriate for his/her level. Required: Basic knowledge of anatomy and neurophysiology. Optional: Assist in surgery of spine pathology on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Tuesday: observe spine surgery; Wednesday a.m.: surgery, orthopaedics teaching classes; Wednesday pm: spine surgery; Thursday: clinic all day; Friday: clinic in a.m. Didactic Content: Teaching in peripatetic fashion. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Demonstrate a grasp of evaluating a low back patient for pathology. 88
  • 89. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPAEDICS Sports Medicine Course #: CLNS 855 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Chris McGrew, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Nancy Jones Goals and Unique Aspects: Student is introduced to the primary care sports medicine system through broad based exposure to a variety of sports medicine settings at the University of New Mexico and in the Albuquerque community. Goals include understanding the multifaceted make-up of a complete sports medicine system, obtaining skills and understanding concerning the care of the competitive and recreational athlete, both in organized and individual settings, and understanding the role of exercise in the promotion of health and the treatment of disease. This is NOT a surgical rotation. Objectives: Objectives include defining a community sports system, proficiency in examination of the shoulder, knee and ankle along with the ability to give a limited diagnosis, explain principles of rehabilitation in the injured athlete, understanding the concept of prevention of sports injuries and understanding the principles of exercise evaluation and exercise prescription in the “well adult.” Responsibilities: Scholarly/Creative Work: Research and write a 3-5 page review of an area of interest in sports medicine utilizing at least five resources, or develop a patient education handout. Observational: Outpatient Sports Medicine Clinic, physical therapy, high school training room, UNM Human Performance Lab, and attend appropriate, indicated surgeries and athletic events. Clinical: Examine patients in outpatient clinics. Present case to attending. Assist with and complete medical record. Assist in exercise evaluation of well adults in Human Performance Lab. Assist in initial evaluation of injured athlete in high school training room. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervision by faculty al all levels of patient contact, including hands- on training and direct observation. Didactic Content: Video tapes of selected joint exams and sports medicine topics. Recommended textbook lists with selected readings. Recommended articles. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Attendance at clinical and other sites of teaching on a regular and timely basis. Appropriate progression of knowledge and hands-on ability and skills with patients. Evaluation of research paper. Additional Information: Student is expected to develop a personal exercise program during this rotation. This rotation is generally NOT available over the winter holidays and mid-May through Mid August. 89
  • 90. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Anatomic Pathology at UNMH Course #: CLNS 872 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2-4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Nancy Joste, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Jeanne Lay Goals and Unique Aspects: Gain familiarity with diagnostic evaluation of tissue specimens, and the overall organization of an anatomic pathology service. The student may rotate through two different sections of the pathology laboratory in blocks of 1-2 weeks or remain on surgical pathology the entire month, depending on the needs of the division. Objectives: Interpret most tissues specimens grossly and microscopically in light of clinical history. Perform frozen sections. Formulate a meaningful, communicative written report interpreting tissue findings with clinical relevance. Responsibilities: Observational: Exposure to the diagnostic cytopathology service is optional. Dissect surgical tissue specimens. Sample and examine tissues histologically. Formulate surgical pathology reports. Clinical: No direct patient contact required. 8-5 weekdays. No night/weekend call. Research: Optional. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Abundant, direct supervision. Didactic content: Daily morning conferences – both didactic and case conferences. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Progress in evaluation of specimens, understanding of clinical-pathological correlations and formulation of reports. 90
  • 91. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Anatomic Pathology at VAMC Course #: CLNS 870 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Larry Mossie, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Jeanne Lay Goals and Unique Aspects: Gain familiarity with diagnostic evaluation of tissue specimens, and the overall organization of an anatomic pathology service. The student may rotate through two different sections of the pathology laboratory in blocks of 2 weeks or remain on anatomic pathology the entire month. Objectives: Interpret most tissue specimens grossly and microscopically in light of clinical history. Perform frozen sections. Formulate a meaningful, communicative written report interpreting tissue findings with clinical relevance. Responsibilities: Observational: Exposure to the diagnostic cytopathology service is optional. Dissect surgical tissue specimens. Sample and examine tissues histologically. Formulate surgical pathology reports. Clinical: No direct patient contact required. 8-5 weekdays. No night/weekend call. Research: Optional. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Abundant, direct supervision. Didactic content: Daily morning conferences – both didactic and case conferences. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Progress in evaluation of specimens, understanding of clinical-pathological correlations and formulation of reports. Additional Information: Veterans’ Administration Medical Center is located at 1501 San Pedro SE. Report to Department of Pathology Services. 256-1711 ext. 2355 91
  • 92. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Clinical Pathology Course #: CLNS 871 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): See Additional Information Prerequisites: NO registration without prior consent of clerkship director(s). We are not able to accommodate students during the months of June and July. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Miquella Herrera Goals and Unique Aspects: To expose the student to laboratory diagnosis of disease on an intense level. The student may rotate through different sections of the pathology laboratory in blocks specifically tailored to individual career goals. Objectives: Use the clinical laboratory more effectively in the diagnosis and management of disease. Responsibilities: Observational: In consultation with departmental faculty, the student tailors a rotation through one or more areas of the laboratory most pertinent to the student’s career goals. In this area (or areas), the student actively participates in the responsibilities of the clinical pathologist or laboratory scientist determining appropriateness of laboratory tests for clinical services; reviewing the meaning of laboratory abnormalities for laboratory uses; working up anomalous laboratory test values; presenting conference cases; learning laboratory techniques, and participating in case sign out among others. The student attends the daily pathology teaching conferences and may collaborate with pathology faculty on research projects or laboratory test development. When rotating in transfusion medicine, the student is involved in evaluating transfusion needs of patients, diagnosis of bleeding and clotting disorders; and seeing patients receiving therapeutic apheresis and stem cell collection. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily. Didactic content: UNMH, Monday AM Clinical pathology didactic conference and Clinical Pathology call conferences. Other conferences may be assigned as designated by laboratory section director. Evaluation: Defined in student handbook. Additional Information: NO registration without prior consent of clerkship director(s). An add/drop slip must be signed to add this course to your schedule. We are not able to accommodate students during the months of June and July. 92
  • 93. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Clinical Pathology [continued] Course #: CLNS 871 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): See Additional Information Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Miquella Herrera Additional Information [continued]: Include section when registering: Section: Area Faculty: A. Transfusion Medicine/Coagulations/ Dr. Kendall Crookston (UNMH) Therapeutic Apheresis B. Hematology Dr. Qian-Yun Zhang C. Medical Computing Dr. Matt Luke (UNMH) D. Molecular Diagnostics, Cytogenetics Dr. Barbara Masten (BMSB 307) Molecular Oncology and Histocompatibility. Note: Hematology available only one week out of each four week session. 93
  • 94. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Clerkship in Forensic Pathology Course #: CLNS 874 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Ross E. Zumwalt, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Connie Jefferson 505-272-0710 Goals and Unique Aspects: Autopsy means “I See.” Student views hospital autopsies in the classic tradition, the final medical procedure. The goal is for the student to understand that many roles of forensic and autopsy pathology in the hospital and community. The course also affords the opportunity to review normal anatomy and learn how different organ systems are affected by common disease processes. This is potentially of value to students considering pursuing one of the surgical specialties. Objectives: Expected learning issues include: Which cases fall under the jurisdiction of the Medical Investigator; Which cases require a medicolegal autopsy; Correct completion of death certificates; Basic performance of an autopsy including dissection techniques, and report preparation; Basic patterns of injury in violent death; Differential diagnosis of sudden, unexpected, natural death; Significance of manners of death; Principles of identification of bodies. Responsibilities: Observational: Student attends and participates in daily morning report and observes autopsies subsequently performed. When appropriate, the student may visit scenes of death or accompany faculty to courtroom proceedings. Research: Student selects a discrete topic in forensic or autopsy pathology under supervision of the director of the rotation and, through targeted reading or review of cases on file at OMI, informally presents his/her findings to staff. Teaching: Student has no formal teaching duties. On occasion, she/he may assist with demonstrations for non-physician trainees or conferences for medical personnel. Required: Student is present daily from 8:00am- 5:00pm in the Office of the Medical Investigator, unless specifically excused by the supervising pathologist. Student has the opportunity for increasing participation and, depending on the availability of appropriate cases and individual progress, may, with guidance, perform an uncomplicated postmortem examination by the end of the elective. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Close one-on-one supervision and instruction by the faculty, fellows in forensic pathology and residents in anatomic pathology. Direct supervision is relatively constant in autopsy suite, where the student spends approximately half the time. The other half is devoted to directed reading (primarily in forensic pathology) and other activities. Didactic Content: Required to attend morning report, weekly forensic pathology journal club, weekly toxicology/pending case conference and weekly neuropathology conferences. Staff review microscopic slides of selected cases with the student. 94
  • 95. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY Clerkship in Forensic Pathology [continued] Course #: CLNS 874 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Ross E. Zumwalt, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Connie Jefferson Evaluation: Based on performance in the autopsy room during morning report and participation in postmortem examinations, quality of verbal and written reports and application of new knowledge from readings and experience at the OMI. The student is also graded on his/her presentation at the end of the rotation. To receive and “outstanding” grade, the student must be evaluated as superior by faculty. In the last week of the rotation, the student will give a 15 minute presentation on a topic of their choice, based upon an autopsy that was observed/performed during the rotation. The presentation should be reviewed beforehand with the attending in charge of the particular autopsy case. An informal pre and post-test will be given at the beginning and end of the rotation, respectively, as a guide to learning progress during the course. Suggested Reading: DiMaio and DiMaio Forensic Pathology; CRC Press Dolinak, Matshes and Lew Forensic Pathology, Principles and Practice; Elsevier 95
  • 96. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Ambulatory Pediatrics at Young Children’s Health Center Course #: CLNS 676 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Javier Aceves, MD Elizabeth Henderson, MD Gillian Harris, MD Joseph Aguirre, MD Lance Chilton, MD Alex Stelzner, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Pediatrics Spanish Speaking Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Clinical experience in a community based pediatric setting. Exposure to family-centered services in low income community of southeast Albuquerque. There is a large immigrant population. Exposure to multicultural aspects in medical care. Integration of primary care and behavioral health in a pediatric setting , especially for children and youth with special health care needs. Objectives: Learners will Be able to state advantages of an integrated clinical medicine – behavioral health approach in pediatrics; Be able to discuss economic and social problems associated with poverty and immigrant status; Be able to deal with common pediatric outpatient problems, such as upper and lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, diarrheal illness, etc.; Be able to handle common chronic pediatric conditions, such as asthma, attention deficit disorder, seizure disorder, etc., specifying diagnostic and treatment plans for each condition and means of supporting other family members as well as the affected member; Be acquainted with community efforts to improve the health and well-being of children and families in the Southeast Heights and be able to state how these might be generalized to other populations. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe multi-agency medical and family services. Clinical: Interview and evaluate/assess health related problems of six to ten patients per day under direct supervision of faculty. No night call. Research: Small scale clinical or community project strongly encouraged. Teaching: May participate in educational activities provided by faculty in neighborhood schools. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervised by pediatric faculty. Didactic content: Reading materials, with reserve materials available on line through HSLIC. 96
  • 97. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Ambulatory Pediatrics at Young Children’s Health Center (continued) Course #: CLNS 676 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Javier Aceves, MD Elizabeth Henderson, MD Gillian Harris, MD Joseph Aguirre, MD Lance Chilton, MD Alex Stelzner, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkships: Pediatrics Spanish Speaking Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Evaluation: Based on direct observation, presentations, and clinical performance. Criteria for outstanding grade: Consistently perform at an outstanding level in all areas, using PRIME. Enthusiasm, ability to relate with patients and their families and with staff, and participation in clinic and/or community projects are important factors. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. Student can arrange schedule as desired since office hours are 8am-7 pm Mon-Tue-Wed-Thurs. Friday hours are from 8am-5pm, and Saturday hours are 9 am to 2 pm. 97
  • 98. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatrics at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 677 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Teresa Vigil, MD Sara Bluefeather, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships including an inpatient general pediatrics component or comparable program in a US/Canadian medical school. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Direct responsibility for diagnosis and treatment of hospitalized pediatric patients (under supervision of residents and faculty attending physicians). Objectives: To assess the nature and severity of illness in a child through history, physical examination and laboratory examinations and to plan for and carry out that patient’s care. Responsibilities: Observational: During rounds and teaching conferences the student observes the approach of others to diagnose and manage patients for whom the student is not directly responsible. Clinical: patient contact is extensive. Students are expected to take ownership of 2-5 patients. Q 4 overnight call. Teaching: The student is responsible for one small group teaching session related to his/her patients. Student is also responsible for educating patients/parents. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervision by upper level resident (PL II, III) and faculty attending. Upper level resident closely supervises student, reviews and countersigns all orders written by the student. Faculty reviews history, physical and progress notes and will directly observe patient presentations. Didactic content: Departmental conferences; morning report Wednesday and Friday; Thursday Grand Rounds; Daily Social Service rounds; daily x-ray rounds; Morbidity & Mortality conference monthly, daily noon conference. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Outstanding grade results from PRIME: 1. patient care excellence. 2. enthusiastic, motivated attitude. 3. overall knowledge. 4. commitment to and demonstrated self learning. 5. managing patients in a logical manner incorporating scientific evidence with individual patient needs. Additional Information: International medical students will be accepted on a case-by-case basis. 98
  • 99. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Cardiology Course #: CLNS 678 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Beth Goens, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: To provide a well-rounded introductory experience to the field of pediatric cardiology. Objectives: Acquire basic knowledge of congenital and acquired heart disease in infants, children and adolescents, and the pathophysiology associated with these problems. Learn to evaluate cardiovascular system by history and physical examination, to distinguish innocent from pathologic heart murmurs. Learn to interpret pediatric electrocardiograms and chest X-rays. Be introduced to advanced cardiovascular diagnostic modalities (echocardiography, exercise stress testing, and diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization). Responsibilities: Observational: Observe evaluation, diagnosis and management of infants, children and adolescents with suspected heart disease; uses and limitations of advanced cardiovascular diagnostic modalities. Clinical: Evaluate all pediatric cardiology inpatients and outpatients, write progress notes, consult, and interpret ECG. Observe echocardiograms, exercise stress test, tilt table test and cardiac catheterizations. Research: None. Teaching: Phase II students accompany us to clinic and you may have the opportunity to teach them. Required: Read complete Pediatric Cardiology syllabus/view DVD format. Attend Wednesday morning cardiosurgical care conference and Cardiology Clinical Conference on Tuesday afternoon. Give 30-minute talk on pediatric cardiology topic. Night/weekend call not required. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Direct supervision by attending cardiologist. Didactic Content: Cardiology slide collection, review heart specimen, multimedia tools including Listen to the Heart (CD-ROMS on heart sounds and murmurs), numerous sites on World Wide Web, faculty PowerPoint presentations on the Children’s Hospital Heart Center website and on New Innovations. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: High level pediatric cardiology knowledge at end of rotation, determined subjectively by the attending cardiologists. High motivation and initiative. Excellence in patient care, evidence of good clinical judgment, professional and courteous interaction with faculty, staff, patients and families. Pre/post tests given as study guide 99
  • 100. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Cardiology (continued) Course #: CLNS 678 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Beth Goens, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Additional Information: Prior approval is required. The student has the opportunity to see many patients with both pathologic and innocent heart murmurs. The student is able to study congenital heart disease by direct inspection of congenital heart specimens. The student receives a full syllabus covering all major topics in pediatric cardiology including: review of embryology and physiology; congestive heart failure; congenital heart disease; acquired heart disease in children; syndromes; pulmonary artery hypertension; drugs; operations for congenital heart disease. 45 day add/drop policy will be strictly enforced. This course will accept visiting students and scheduling can be flexible. 100
  • 101. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Rehabilitation/Pediatric Chronic Disease Course #: CLNS 679 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Denise Taylor, MD M. Armstrong, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Provides a comprehensive experience caring for special needs children and children and adolescents recovering from traumatic brain injury and other disabling conditions, integrating the medical and psychosocial aspects of their care. Understand the neurologic basis of rehabilitation. Interact with multidisciplinary teams, the educational system and community resources. Objectives: Recognize and contract the developmentally delayed child/infant to known normal growth and development markers. Perform complete histories and physicals on special needs children (inpatient and outpatient), and formulate treatment/rehabilitative plans. Recognize the impact of a chronic handicapping condition on child, family and community. Responsibilities: Observational: Perform histories and physicals in clinics (Peds, rehab, multidisciplinary); participate in team rehab conference; inpatient treatment sessions in PT, OT SLP, recreation, special education, family conferences. Clinical: At least one new CP, pediatric or rehabilitation evaluation, complete history and physical with formulation of treatment plan. Research: Individually determined. Required: Attend multidisciplinary clinics and at least one rehab conference; visit at least one community program; follow two or more rehab inpatients(s) through therapies. Participate in outpatient clinics. Optional: Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinics, Resident Teaching Conferences, IRA, Pediatric Neurology Clinics, observe PT, OT, SLP, O&P. Participate in neurobehavioral clinic. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Shared by pediatric physiatrist, and general pediatricians. Didactic content: Reading lists provided, resident lectures, weekly rehabilitation lecture series. Evaluation: Based on clinical observations by faculty. Criteria for outstanding grade: Meet goals and objectives with enthusiasm and demonstrate excellence in skills and comprehension of materials. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. 101
  • 102. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Genetics and Dysmorphology Course #: CLNS 680 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Richard Heidenreich, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Integrated experience in clinical dysmorphology and genetics with the application of DNA technology to clinical care. Gain experience in the use of clinical and laboratory tools in the analysis of aberrant morphogenesis and genetic disorders. There is the opportunity to attend an genetics outreach clinic by special arrangement. Objectives: Be able to take a detailed genetic history; perform a clinical examination for dysmorphic features; develop a detailed understanding of genetic mechanisms; utilize computerized genetic database resources. Responsibilities: Observational: With the assistance of the genetics staff, learn how to conduct detailed genetic examinations and history. Clinical: participate in weekly scheduled genetics clinic and consultations (usually 3-5 per week). Research: Access web-based and other resources for diagnosis and testing of genetic disorders in the patients. Teaching: Educate patient and family as appropriate. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Shared by two clinical genetics faculty: Carol Clericuzio, MD; Tom Cishing, MD; as well as by Joanne Milisa Drautz, MS, Genetic Counselor. Make daily rounds, participate in clinics and weekly clinical conference. Attend twice monthly metabolic genetics clinics at Carrie Tingley Hospital. Didactic content: Designated reading. Responsible for library searches as appropriate. Attend lectures and seminars as appropriate. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Assumes responsibility for follow up and counseling of all patients he/she is involved with. Does independent reading, with evidence of effective use of the literature for problem solving in clinical settings. Integrates basic biologic mechanisms with clinical data. Is aware of all patients on the inpatient services who represent problems in morphogenesis and/or hereditary disorders. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. Contact the Peds Dept for information on dates of availability. 102
  • 103. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Hematology / Oncology Course #: CLNS 681 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): James McKinnell, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduce the student to issues relating to clinical management in both the inpatient and outpatient settings of childhood cancers and hematologic disorders: diagnostic work up, therapies, supportive care, emotional support, follow up of late effects and end of life issues, as well as general hematology work ups and comprehensive hemophilia care. Objectives: Recognize common types of childhood cancers and hematologic disorders; develop some expertise in taking focused histories and determining appropriate diagnostic work ups. Become familiar with process of choosing and instituting therapy and special supportive families/patients dealing with childhood cancer. See the importance of cooperative group trials in clinical oncology. Responsibilities: Multidisciplinary team approach to management of childhood cancers and hematologic disorders: medical, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and child life. Become familiar with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, central venous catheters and the administration of chemotherapy. Clinical: Two weeks on the inpatient service and two weeks in the outpatient clinic. While on inpatient service, round daily on patients with attending, coordinate care plan and write daily progress notes on assigned patients. Also attend any treatment or family conferences in the outpatient clinic setting, see patients presenting for follow up under the supervision of an attending, observe diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Will also review lab results, radiographic studies and peripheral blood and bone marrow smears with attending faculty. Required attendance at monthly pediatric tumor board. Research: Present seminar at the end of the course. Teaching: Patient education and outcome evaluation. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Drs. Linda Butros, Jami Frost, Jeffrey Hanrahan, Richard Heideman, Prasad Mathew, James McKinnel, and Stuart Winter are the responsible faculty. Close supervision and teaching will also be given by the hematology/oncology nurses and social workers. Didactic content: Small didactic sessions conducted by the inpatient attending at least once a week; clinic patient care discussions; ward rounds; selected reading. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Based on evaluation by oncology team: excellent fund of knowledge consistently applied to patient care; mastery of pertinent data combined with excellence in reporting; demonstration of independent thinking and initiative. 103
  • 104. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Adolescent Medicine Course #: CLNS 683 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Karen Campbell, MD Vic Strasburger, MD Alberta Kong, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Useful for anyone going into Primary Care or interested in adolescents. Exposure to different groups of adolescents (clinic, schools, college), and to common adolescent health problems, e.g. acne, mono, STD’s, contraception. Gain understanding of the basic physiology and psychology of adolescence. Objectives: Perform a competent history and physical exam on a teenager. Interview a teenager and his/her family. Prescribe contraceptives appropriately. Responsibilities: Observational: At locked treatment center for juvenile offenders (Sequoyah Adolescent Treatment Center). Clinical: Opportunity to see and treat teenagers at a variety of different clinical sites. Research: Readings in adolescent medicine (provided). Teaching: Present an oral 15-20 minutes conference on any adolescent medicine topic at the end of the rotation. Required: Attend one clinic per week at Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine, STD Clinic, School-based Clinic, and Sequoyah Adolescent Treatment Center. Optional: Sports Medicine Clinic, Planned Parenthood, Job Corps. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Drs. Strasburger and Epstein supervise at Pediatrics/Adolescent Medicine clinics and Dr. McGrath at the school-based clinic. Other supervision arranged, depending on the student’s interests and choices. Didactic content: Readings provided. Pediatric AM conferences, where appropriate. One or two adolescent medicine conferences per week (informal). Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Clinical excellence, high degree of motivation and interest, and excellent preparation of one talk on any adolescent medicine subject. Additional Information: Prior approval is required. This is an informal exposure to the field of Adolescent medicine which can be tailored to the needs of an individual student (e.g. more gynecology, sports medicine, psychology, etc). Ample time for reading and reflection. Travel to local clinics required. 104
  • 105. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Intensive Care Course #: CLNS 684 Credit: Intensive Care Unit Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Dawn Joseph, MD Denise Coleman, MD Mark Crowley, MD Tito Monge, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: To learn the diagnosis and management of critically ill pediatric patients. The student will learn the pathophysiology of the common pediatric diseases in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit including: 1. Recognition and stabilization of the critically ill patient. 2. Recognition and treatment of respiratory failure. 3. Recognition and treatment of shock. 4. Treatment of status asthmaticus. 5. treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. 6. Recognition and treatment of increased intracranial pressure and coma. 7. management of metabolic emergencies – problems with sodium, potassium, glucose, calcium. 8. Recognition and management of hepatic failure. 9. Recognition and management of acute renal failure. 10. Participate in both procedural and ICU sedations. Objectives: Student will actively participate in the work up, presentation, and daily management of critically ill pediatric patients in the PICU. Student will participate in procedures (including airway management and vascular access), workups, present patients, write notes. Responsibilities: Clinical: Student will be responsible for working up, presenting, rounding on, and writing notes on up to 3 patients at a time. Student will become familiar with mechanical ventilation, blood gas interpretation, central venous catheter insertion, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, organ failure, and TPN/enteral nutrition. Teaching: Work rounds and bed side teaching daily. Attending lectures 2-3 times per week. Resident mini-lectures. Students are also required to present a 15-20 minutes talk on an ICU topic of their choice. Required: Q4 Night call; work up/follow up to three patients at a time. Attend pediatric morning report on Wednesday and Friday and pediatric noon conferences. Supervision and Teaching: Students will be directly supervised by PICU attendings and senior pediatric residents. Amount and type: Student will be supervised by and have access to PICU attendings at all times; also supervised by the senior resident. Didactic content: Textbooks available in PICU. Student should review the Power Point presentations on www.picucourse.org as well as have didactic lectures provided by the attendings on the core/common PICU diseases. 105
  • 106. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Intensive Care (continued) Course #: CLNS 684 Credit: Intensive Care Unit Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Dawn Joseph, MD Denise Coleman, MD Mark Crowley, MD Tito Monge, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Evaluation: Based on clinical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, topic presentation. Based on clinical observations by faculty and senior resident. Criteria for outstanding grade: Commitment to excellent patient care and enthusiasm for the role he/she plays in the PICU team; demonstration of outside reading and self-motivated study. Accurate data gathering and reporting and involvement in patient care. 45 day add/drop policy will be strictly enforced. 106
  • 107. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Infectious Disease Course #: CLNS 686 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Sheila Hickey, MD Martha Miller, MD Walter Dehority, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Provide an approach to problem solving and management of pediatric infectious disease and an overview of careers in pediatric infectious diseases. Objectives: Understand basic pediatric infectious disease processes, and immunization practice. Learn to provide consultative pediatric care, organize and write a teaching review, and choose the most appropriate antibiotic for empiric therapy of specific organ system infections. Understand basic antimicrobial chemotherapy. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe/participate with faculty, residents, fellows in direct and consultative care. Clinical: Ongoing projects require student participation to the same extent house officers. Research: may participate in clinical or laboratory research, written reviews, case reports. Teaching: Attend pediatrics and pediatric infectious disease conference. May be asked to provide up to two oral and/or two written literature searches. Required: Perform, write and present consults. Attend all pediatric weekly teaching conferences. Participate in problem based case analysis and in clinical microbiology interactive teaching. Optional: No fixed call is required. Prepare an oral/written case(s) review. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervised by faculty, occasional PL2/PL3 or adult ID fellow. Didactic content: Provided by Department of Pediatrics, ID Teaching Conferences (1 hour/week), ID rounds (5 hours/week), additional didactic sessions. Evaluation: Based on clinical/written (e.g. consults) skills, verbal reports, attendance, completion of reports and in-depth study. No examination. Criteria for outstanding grade: Commitment to excellent patient care and scholarly activity, quality self-direction and independent study, excellent clinical skills. Performance at the level of consistent reporter and interpreter, starting to manage. Additional Information: Pediatric Infectious Disease has a highly variable patient load, which requires high motivation and self-directed independent study skills. Contact the Peds Dept for information on dates of availability. Prior approval is required. Not available to visiting students. 107
  • 108. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Newborn Intensive Care Unit Course #: CLNS 687 Credit: Intensive Care Unit Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Renate Savich, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Pediatrics Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Attend all high risk deliveries. To learn intensive care management of neonates, fluids, nutrition, ventilator management, infectious diseases of the newborn, learn physiology and embryology. Family centered approach to intensive care. Objectives: To provide excellent care for the sick newborn and understand pathophysiology of newborns. Understand family dynamics during this time. Responsibilities: Observational: Rounds, procedures (involved in patient care as well as observation), labor & delivery. Clinical: patient care and management. Perform procedures such as intubations, resuscitation, umbilical catheters. Research: Clinical studies as desired. Teaching: Give one talk to group, participate in discussions on rounds. Required: No night call, only daytime shifts (intern equivalent). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: By senior faculty, fellows and resident. Didactic content: Read, attend lectures. Evaluation: Based on daily involvement with attendings, fellows, and resident. Criteria for outstanding grade: Greatly increase fund of knowledge. Provide excellent care. Work well with team. Additional Information: The Phase III student in the NBICU functions as a subintern and has direct responsibility for patient care and delivery room experience. Excellent rotation for those interested in pediatrics, family practice, obstetrics or anesthesia. 45 day add/drop policy will be strictly enforced. 108
  • 109. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Pediatric Outpatient Department Course #: CLNS 688 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Penny Brandt, MD Chandler Todd, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: Clinical experience in pediatrics in an ambulatory setting which includes patients of high acuity as well as health care maintenance visits. Objectives: Diagnose and treat common pediatric problems. Evaluate and manage6-10 patients per day. Appreciate the developmental milestones of childhood and adolescence and how development impacts interactions. Responsibilities: Observational: take responsibility, under supervision, of each patient assigned. Clinical: 6-10 patients per day (8 hours); full responsibility for each patient, call every 4 th night, including one Saturday and one Sunday. Research: Optional. Teaching: Patient education, preparation and presentation of one informal brief morning report in clinic. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Every patient is presented and reviewed by clinic faculty at UNMH. Didactic content: Attend 45-60 minute case management rounds every morning, give at least one “report” to residents, faculty and staff; attend conferences as scheduled. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding grade: Fulfill expectations listed above in a consistently “outstanding” manner – using the PRIME grading scale. 109
  • 110. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Westside Family Health Outpatient Clinic Course: CLNS 690 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Sandra Whisler, MD Michael Pleacher, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships including an outpatient general pediatrics component or comparable program in a US/Canadian medical school. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Goals and Unique Aspects: To know immunization schedules, to fell comfortable with well child checkups, to learn to care for children with special health care needs in an outpatient setting. To learn how to do a proper sports medicine physical exam, make an assessment of the problem, and then formulate an appropriate treatment plan, To be exposed to patients from a variety of social, economic, and ethnic backgrounds. To see many different payer systems and learn to give quality medical care within these systems (third party payer and three Medicare Salud Programs) Objectives: To become competent in doing both acute and well child care in an outpatient office setting. To become competent in doing sports medicine care in an outpatient office setting. Students will be able to: Obtain and document an age appropriate pediatric history; Obtain and document an age appropriate pediatric physical examination; Order and interpret laboratory values, X-rays, and other examinations; Make an accurate assessment of the problem/problems and formulate a differential diagnoses list; Develop and document a care plan; Implement and monitor through documentation the care plan Responsibilities: Observational: Internal medicine and Pediatrics working together in an outpatient setting. Clinical: Interpretation of lab results, participation in patient education, well child checks, sick child visits, ages and stages questionnaire. X-rays, etc. Teaching: Student receives several didactic sessions and learns patient education with materials present in clinic. All patients are written up in the clinic log and presented to a faculty member. Optional: Student may have opportunity to do suturing, wart removals, blood draws, PAPs, place splints, attend local high school athletic events, etc. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Supervision by Dr. Whisler and Dr Pleacher. Didactic content :Mini lectures on a variety of topics. Student is expected to read about disease processes seen in clinic. At the end of the 4 weeks students are expected to give a 30 minute presentation on some aspect of ambulatory Pediatrics. 110
  • 111. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PEDIATRICS Westside Family Health Outpatient Clinic (continued) Course: CLNS 690 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Sandra Whisler, MD Michael Pleacher, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships including an outpatient general pediatrics component or comparable program in a US/Canadian medical school. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Pediatrics Clerkship Coordinator Julia Martin Evaluation: Clinical observations and ability to do a complete history and physical exam, make an assessment, and formulate a plan as well as develop a differential diagnosis. Criteria for outstanding grade: Fulfill expectations in an outstanding manner, using PRIME. Give an outstanding 30 minute presentation at end of rotation. Additional Information: Prior approval is required by Dr Whisler. This practice is truly a group practice with approximately 50% insurance patients and 50% Salud/UNM Care patients. The practice resembles private practice in many ways although Westside is under the umbrella of UNM. This is an off-campus clerkship. 111
  • 112. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Advanced Clinical Psychiatry [Inpatient] Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 726 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Direct responsibility for evaluation, diagnosis, treatment and discharge planning of hospitalized psychiatric patients (under supervision of faculty attending psychiatrists and house staff). Objectives: Evaluation (history, physical and mental status examinations, laboratory, psychological testing), diagnosis and management of patients with severe psychiatric disorders. Responsibilities: Observational: Attendance/participation in reports, rounds and conferences; patient interviews and procedures. Clinical: Extensive patient contact involving approximately eight hours per day in direct patient related activity at the intern level of responsibility. Students take two evening calls in the Psychiatric Emergency Service shared with a resident. Research: Optional, depending upon program and ongoing research projects. Teaching: Responsible for helping to teach Phase II students assigned to service. Student is expected to select a relevant topic for research, and make an Evidence Based Critical Appraisal prior to the end of the rotation. Supervision and Teaching: The psychiatric attending faculty and house staff directly supervise the student. Evaluative examinations, diagnostic treatment and management plans are thoroughly reviewed, discussed and evaluated. The student is expected to attend morning reports, meetings, weekly house staff seminars and departmental conferences. Evaluation: Student’s grade is determined by evaluation of performance in areas listed on student evaluation form. Criteria for outstanding grade: An “outstanding” grade is given for performance demonstrating professionalism and patient rapport, an unusual depth of knowledge, meticulous patient care and competent completion of charting in the electronic medical record, and competence in formulation and presentation skills. Additional Information: This rotation is able to accept visiting students. Scheduling can be flexible as long as dates do not interfere with UNM students scheduled for the rotation. Rotation is offered at MHC, VAMC and CPH. This rotation is not offered in the month of December. 112
  • 113. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Advanced Clinical Emergency Psychiatry [Ambulatory] Course #: CLNS 727 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Direct responsibility for evaluation, diagnosis, planning and treatment of ambulatory psychiatric patients (under supervision of faculty attending psychiatrists and house staff). Objectives: Evaluation (history, physical and mental status examinations, laboratory, psychological testing), diagnosis and management of emergency ambulatory patients with acute and severe psychiatric symptoms. Responsibilities: Observational: Attendance/participation in reports, rounds and conferences; patient interviews and procedures. Clinical: Extensive patient contact involving approximately eight hours per day in direct patient related activity at the intern level of responsibility. No evening or weekend call. Research: Student must find two patient problems to research and present to attendings/residents/staff. Teaching: Responsible for helping to teach and sign off to Phase II students assigned to service for evening call. Supervision and Teaching: The psychiatric attending faculty and house staff directly supervise the student. Evaluative examinations, diagnostic treatment and management plans are thoroughly reviewed, discussed and evaluated. The student is expected to attend morning reports, meetings, weekly house staff seminars and departmental conferences. Evaluation: Student’s grade is determined by evaluation of performance in areas listed on student evaluation form. Criteria for outstanding grade: An “outstanding” grade is given for performance demonstrating professionalism and patient rapport, an unusual depth of knowledge, meticulous patient care and competent completion of charting in the electronic medical record and competence in formulation, presentation and risk assessment skills. Additional Information: This rotation is not able to accept visiting students. This rotation is not offered in the month of December. 113
  • 114. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Neuropsychology Course #: CLNS 729 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Develop experience and understanding of issues involved with evaluation of higher cortical dysfunction. Objectives: Review mental status exams and develop expanded mental status exam. Assess ten patients with mental status exam. Present mental status data formally on five patients. Observe detailed neuropsychological evaluation of five patients. Observe videotapes on at least five patients in video library. Responsibilities: Observational: Neuropsychological evaluations; therapeutic discussion of results with patient. Clinical: Perform detailed mental status (cognitive) examination. Research: Optional involvement in research comparing utility of various approaches to cognitive screening of older patients. Teaching: Present at least five patients to VA neuropsychology clinical case conference. Required: Five patients (opportunity to work with 10-20 patients), formal report on five. Optional: Readings in selected texts, journals. View videotapes of well-defined patient presentations. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Approximately ten hours per week detailed supervision by faculty. Didactic content: Relevant readings directed according to the patient population that is seen, and by student interest. Student should be available Thursdays from 10:00am until 12:00pm in order to attend research seminar. This is an opportunity to hear presentations on selected topics in neuropsychology. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on observation of student’s work with patients, the written report, and presentations of patients in conference. Criteria for outstanding grade: Complete required five patient examinations with reports and observe or participate in at least five other exams. Show initiative in following up suggested readings. Demonstrate flexibility in incorporating feedback and supervision into ongoing work with patients. Additional Information: This rotation is not able to accept visiting students. Rotation is located off campus at VAMC. This rotation is not offered in the month of December. 114
  • 115. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Alcohol and Substance Abuse Program Course #: CLNS 730 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Introduction to the areas of substance abuse, giving students an opportunity to work with patients who have substance abuse problems in an outpatient detox and treatment program (ASAP) and in an outpatient dual diagnosis clinic at University Psychiatric Center. Objectives: Take a thorough history, evaluating use and abuse of substances. Develop a working knowledge of the detoxification process. Develop knowledge of physical symptoms of substance abuse. Be able to identify patients with early problems related to substance abuse and dependence. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe patient evaluations at intake. Observe several clinical intakes and interviews by experienced staff. Participate in treatment planning and triage meetings. Participate in interviewing the family. Clinical: Assigned patients to follow for detoxification or in the day program. Participate in the initial education of the patient. Hours 8:00am-5:00pm, no night or weekend call. Prepare and deliver a lecture to day program patients. Participate in AA/NA meetings. Research: May participate in ongoing research. May initiate and complete small project with clinical staff’s supervision. Teaching: Teach skill building in day program. Lecture to day program patients. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Meet weekly for at least one hour for supervision and more often as necessary. Didactic content: Participate in Division’s in-service training. Attend Psychiatry Grand Rounds. Must choose a topic for review in the substance abuse area, and make a presentation to clinical supervisor. Attend treatment planning sessions. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Ability to work with patients and staff. Ability to take a competent substance abuse history and give competent presentations with plans. Dependability and professionalism. Ability to maintain charts. Additional Information: This rotation is able to accept visiting students. Scheduling can be flexible as long as dates do not interfere with UNM students scheduled for the rotation. All students should be advised this rotation is located off campus. Students will need to drive to another location not located at the University. This rotation is not available during the month of December. 115
  • 116. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Consultation and Liaison Psychiatry Course #: CLNS 731 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Learn to perform comprehensive psychiatric evaluation (including mental status exam) in a consultative setting. Opportunity to evaluate “biopsychosocial” issues in a hospital setting. Opportunity to learn to conduct family treatment, brief psychotherapy, and make psychiatric treatment decisions. Objectives: Perform psychiatric consultation on a variety of medical, surgical, pediatric, and OB patients. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe staff evaluate patients, formulate consultation, and communicate with referring staff. Clinical: Act as “subintern” in doing consults and following patents in hospital or as outpatients while on rotation. 8:00am-5:00pm, Monday through Friday, no night or weekend call. Research: If interested, student can participate in ongoing studies and learn to use structured interviews or standardized questionnaires. Teaching: May teach Phase II students on occasion. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Attends regular teaching rounds, conferences, seminars as well as supervision for each case. Didactic content: Service rounds two/three times per week, department rounds four times per month, individual supervision on each case. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Clinical skills development, quality written and oral presentation of consults. Ability to maintain electronic medical record. Additional Information: This rotation is able to accept visiting students. Scheduling can be flexible as long as dates do not interfere with UNM students scheduled for the rotation. This rotation is not offered during the month of December. 116
  • 117. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Advanced Clinical Psychiatry [Ambulatory] Course #: CLNS 732 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 4 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Direct responsibility for evaluation, diagnosis, planning and treatment of ambulatory psychiatric patients (under supervision of faculty attending psychiatrists and house staff, especially chief resident). Objectives: Evaluation (history, physical and mental status examinations, laboratory, psychological testing), diagnosis and management of ambulatory patients with severe psychiatric disorders and for consultation to primary care providers. Responsibilities: Observational: Attendance/participation in reports, rounds and conferences; patient interviews and procedures. Clinical: Extensive patient contact involving approximately four to eight hours per day in direct patient related activity at the intern level of responsibility. No Call. Research: Optional, depending upon program and ongoing research projects. Teaching: Responsible for helping to teach Phase II students assigned to service for afternoon. Students are expected to select a relevant topic and make an Evidence Based Critical Appraisal presentation prior to the end of the rotation. Supervision and Teaching: The psychiatric attending faculty and house staff directly supervise the student. Evaluative examinations, diagnostic treatment and management plans are thoroughly reviewed, discussed and evaluated. The student is expected to attend meetings, weekly house staff seminars and departmental conferences. Evaluation: Student’s grade is determined by evaluation of performance in areas listed on student evaluation form. Criteria for outstanding grade: An “outstanding” grade is given for performance demonstrating professionalism and patient rapport, an unusual depth of knowledge, meticulous patient care and competent completion of electronic medical record, and competence in formulation and presentation skills. Additional Information: This rotation is not able to accept visiting students. This rotation is not offered during the month of December. 117
  • 118. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHIATRY Psychiatric Care of Developmental Disabilities Course #: CLNS 733 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Deborah Dellmore, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Mary Haley Goals and Unique Aspects: Increase knowledge about developmental disabilities. Increase accuracy diagnosing psychiatric illness. Objectives: Competency in doing an interview with persons with developmental disabilities. Demonstrate clear write-ups and comprehensive evaluation of psychiatric and medical illness. Responsibilities: Observational: Attending psychiatrist performing exams. Clinical: Physical and mental status clinical examinations as needed. Research: Movement d/o assessment, etiology of MR (prevalence and incidence studies). Teaching: Case write-ups. Required: Attendance, seeing patients, doing clinical evaluation on at least two patients per clinic. Optional: Attend related clinics and consultations. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct by faculty and residents. Didactic content: Readings. Evaluation: Clinical observation, and oral questions and answers. Criteria for outstanding grade: Show initiative, research questions of interest with relevant literature search and review; Comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and formulation initiated and maintained by student. Show/demonstrate cross-disciplinary interests for developmental disabilities/follow-up. Additional Information: This rotation is able to accept visiting students. Scheduling can be flexible as long as dates do not interfere with UNM students scheduled for the rotation. This rotation is not offered during the month of December. 118
  • 119. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY Neuroradiology Course #: CLNS 882 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Blaine L. Hart, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Hollie Medina Goals and Unique Aspects: In-depth exposure to neuroradiology, including clinical applications of brain and spine adult imaging, pediatric neuroimaging, and head and neck (ENT and ophthalmologic) disorders. Also provides the opportunity to pursue investigation into specific topics, either collaborative research with a faculty member in the Department of Radiology or case report and literature review. Objectives: Exposure through current clinical material of all major areas of neuroradiology, as well as introduction to associated procedures. Design and initiate research on a specific case op topic, with a goal of publication in a peer-reviewed literature or department- sponsored internet case presentations. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily supervision by Drs. Hart, Rupp, or Hayek. Didactic Content: Daily neuroradiology film reading. Weekly neuroradiology conference. Monthly tumor board. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Active participation in breadth of neuroradiology clinical work, and performance and review of research work and presentation. Additional Information: This rotation is not available during UNM winter break. 119
  • 120. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY Diagnostic Radiology Course #: CLNS 883 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 6 maximum, 2 minimum Faculty Evaluator(s): Gary Mlady, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Hollie Medina Goals and Unique Aspects: Acquaint student with multiple imaging modalities guided by subspecialized faculty. Objectives: Know proper sequencing of radiologic imaging modalities to achieve better patient care while containing cost. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe performance of special, interventional, GI, and GU procedures. Attend Clinical film reading sessions including Radiographs, MRI, CT, Ultrasound and Nuclear Medicine students. Clinical: No night or weekend call. Optional: Opportunity to dictate radiology studies and/or perform procedures under supervision of attending radiologist. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily. Didactic Content: Lectures, seminars, observing procedures and description by faculty, film reading, clinical sessions. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on the following criteria: written quiz, activity log, participation and attendance. Additional Information: Stress didactic orientation in academic setting covering all imaging modalities and subspecialties. This course is not available during UNM Winter Break. 120
  • 121. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Burns and Trauma Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 751 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 3 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas R. Howdieshell, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Students may go to other cancer centers for observation of special procedures within Albuquerque. Objectives: Evaluate diagnostic and primary therapeutic modalities of care of acutely injured patients. Emphasis on pre- and post-operative care. Some technical emphasis on basic interventional procedures. Responsibilities: Clinical: On call every third night, function in capacity of subintern (no more than 80 hours per week). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily with rounds by attendings. All activities under supervision of residents. Didactic Content: Morning rounds. Reading and background material provided. Attend Thursday morning service conference and weekly teaching sessions. Student is expected to make one didactic presentation of 15-20 minutes. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: By consensus of attendings and housestaff. 121
  • 122. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Thoracic Surgery at UNMH Course #: CLNS 752 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Jess Schwarz, MD Charles Dietl, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Exposure to thoracic surgical procedures. Cases involve benign and malignant diseases of the mediastinum, chest wall, lung, esophagus, and pleura. Students are exposed to the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative care of thoracic patients. Endoscopic and video procedures are also performed, clinic time is provided. Objectives: Participate in all operative procedures including bronchoscopy, esophagoscopy, video thoracoscopy, mediastinoscopy and resections of lung, esophagus, chest wall, etc. Present own patients on rounds. Attend conferences. Participate in selected case/topic presentation. Responsibilities: Observational: As above, all aspects of patient care with general thoracic disease: clinics, operating room, inpatients, intensive care unit, x-ray rounds. Clinical: As above, student may perform consults, initial patients evaluations. Teaching: Student presents patients on rounds, didactic conferences. Required: Brief paper on specific condition of patients in the service and/or other relevant topics. Optional: Presentation to Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Education Conference on a topic of choice. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily contact with house staff, thoracic resident and attending. Didactic Content: Conferences consist of weekly lectures and biweekly clinics. . Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Excellence in clinical performance, quality of required papers and brief presentations to Education Conference. Demonstration of outstanding fund of knowledge, interpersonal relationship and self-education. 122
  • 123. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Ophthalmology Course #: CLNS 754 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mark Schluter, MD Prerequisites: Knowledge of head and neck anatomy, neuroanatomy and basic scrub technique. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Direct hands-on patient exams (history, 8 point eye exam, technical steps) of ophthalmology patients using all the equipment. Objectives: For ophthalmology bound students, intense exposure to skills needed during first part of their residency and thereafter. Responsibilities: Observational: All aspects of eye patient care: eye surgery, procedures, results, complications. Research: Can be considered. Required: mastery of basic exam, equipment, reading. Optional: Initial triage of emergency patients and consults. Evaluation: By chief resident and faculty. 123
  • 124. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Otolaryngology Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 755 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Dan Morrison, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: To provide comprehensive exposure to clinical and surgical, general, pediatric, and oncologic otolaryngology. Objectives: Perform a complete head and neck examination; recognize and diagnose common head and neck problems such as dizziness, vertigo, headaches, sinus pathology, dysphasia, etc; interpret an audiogram; understand appropriate referral criteria and database for all head and neck diseases; demonstrate competence management of surgical ENT patients. Responsibilities: Observational: Pediatric head and neck oncology, otology surgical cases, inpatient wards. Clinical: Patient care, consultations, surgery assistance, clinic participation with faculty supervision. Research: Optional. Teaching: Required presentation at first surgical conference; weekly presentations at Monday teaching conferences, and mentoring other medical students. Required: Week on and weekend call, and direct patient care. Optional: Rotation at VA. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct by senior faculty and residents. Didactic content: Monday morning teaching conference. Evaluation: Assessment of clinical performance by residents and faculty, and performance on Friday presentations. Criteria for outstanding grade: Based on overall quality of work, presentation at surgical conference and consensus of faculty and residents. 124
  • 125. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY General Surgery at VAMC Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 756 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Darra Kingsley, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: The subinternship is designed for the student to serve at a more responsible level of patient care management, performing history and physical exams, problem lists, ordering diagnostic tests, writing orders and all aspects of surgical care of selected problems. Objectives: To enhance the student’s knowledge of the evaluation and management of more difficult problems of a surgical patient. Recognize clinical problems in general surgery. Initial and complete work-up of more difficult problems. Work independently in the surgical clinics. Work as first assistant in the OR. Responsibilities: Observational: Participate as a member of the surgical team. Become proficient in minor surgery. Evaluate more difficult problems. Clinical: Daily assignment, alternate call with an intern, work in hospital every third weekend. Research: Optional. Teaching: An assignment of topic for third year instruction. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: All work is supervised. Daily ward rounds, review of cases two times per week and approval of clinic work. Didactic Content: An assignment of topic. Evaluation: Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Quality of histories and physicals and problem list. Quality of patient care. Responses to questions of patient care on ward rounds. Knowledge in OR and clinics. 125
  • 126. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Pediatric Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 757 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): David Lemon, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: The student functions as a subintern on a service with two surgical residents. He/she, under supervision, evaluates patients, writes orders and performs some diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A wide range of pediatric surgical pathology is seen on this service. Students develop clinical skills, making the transition between pure student and practicing physician. Disciplines of basic sciences, especially embryology, are coordinated with core information gained in Pediatrics and General Surgery. Objectives: To understand basic pediatric surgical principles in the areas of diagnosis, operative treatment, anatomy, and physiology. Learn to work together as part of a surgical team with a common effort and goal. Learn to appreciate the differences between adult and pediatric surgical problems and their solutions. The student should acquire a knowledge of the work-up, pre and post-operative management and aspects of the operative techniques involved in caring for patients that range in age from neonates to adolescents with a wide variety of congenital and acquired disorders. Responsibilities: Observational: To be responsible for his/her share of work ups and day to day record keeping. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily contact with faculty and senior resident during patient care rounds and in the operating room. Close supervision by attendings and surgical residents. Didactic content: The student is expected to attend most General Surgery and Pediatric conferences. Additionally, attendance at a weekly pediatric seminar and pediatric surgery pathology slide review with the Department of pathology is encouraged. Text: Swenson Pediatric Surgery edited by Raffensperger. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Based upon overall quality of work, enthusiasm, comprehension of essential material, ability to accept responsibility and discharge it promptly and efficiently, and the ability to work as a team member. Additional Information: Students who anticipate dealing with children in the future are strongly urged to consider this rotation. This includes future pediatricians, surgeons and/or family practitioners. 126
  • 127. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Urology Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 758 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Anthony Smith, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Student assumes level of responsibility commensurate with Phase III on wards and in clinic for patient workup and management. Participates in the operating room at his/her level of ability. Objectives: Enhance student’s knowledge of evaluation and management of challenging urologic patients; recognize pertinent clinical problems in urology and develop appropriate treatment plans; develop a degree of competency that allows for independent initial evaluation in the urology clinics; assist in operating room, and become more comfortable with perioperative management of urologic patients. Responsibilities: Observational: Participate as an active urology team member, observe procedures and surgeries, and become proficient in minor surgical procedures and in evaluation of more difficult problems. Clinical: Daily task include, but are not limited to, inpatient rounds, evaluating and managing clinic patients, and familiarity with and ability to interpret all tests and imaging modalities. Research: May participate in on-going research projects or initiate a new one. Teaching: Responsible for teaching of junior medical students, and presenting on selected topics to residents and faculty. Required: Function at, or near intern level. Participate in inpatient care, clinics and OR. Take call as determined by Chief Resident. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Faculty and residents closely supervise student’s work on wards, in clinics, or in operating room. In addition to morning rounds teaching, the student attends all urologic conferences and any other didactic teaching sessions. Attendance at weekly grand rounds is required. Evaluation: Based on demonstrated knowledge on wards, in operating room and in clinic as relates to quality of patient care, didactic materials comprehension and technical ability. Criteria for outstanding grade: Demonstrate outstanding fund of knowledge in urological diseases, technical ability and patient care. Base on faculty and resident consensus. Additional Information: This is a unique opportunity to participate in New Mexico’s only comprehensive urologic surgery program. Management of these patients provides invaluable knowledge applicable to many other medicine disciplines. 127
  • 128. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Surgery at UNMH Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 759 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas R. Howdieshell, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Expose student to surgery in an applied, direct patient care setting at the responsibility level of a surgery intern. Objectives: Evaluate and follow surgical patients in out-patient and hospital settings acting as a sub- intern. Perform minor case under the supervision of an attending, depending on technical ability. Experience the requirements of a surgery intern. Responsibilities: Observational: Observe ICU procedures, work closely with attending to evaluate and treat patients, and observe consult resident’s work-up of more urgent cases. Clinical: Minor procedures under direct attending supervision. Teaching: Assist with teaching Phase II students during clinic and attending rounds. Required: In-house call every fourth to fifth night. No vacation allowed during the month. Time off given as with surgery interns. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by residents and attending staff. Didactic content: Self-study, attendance at resident conferences and education meetings. Curriculum guided by resident schedule. Evaluation: Based on observations of attendings and residents. Criteria for outstanding grade: Demonstrate clinical skills and patient care equal to or above that of surgical interns. Additional Information: Student is personally responsibly, under the guidance of senior residents, for 5-7 patients on the hospital wards, and follows additional studies on the rest of the hospital service. Average time in OR is 30%, in outpatient clinics 30%, and in hospital patient care 40%. 128
  • 129. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Surgical Critical Care ICU Course #: CLNS 760 Credit: Intensive Care Unit Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas R. Howdieshell, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Exposure to critically ill trauma and surgical patients. Objectives: At the end of the rotation, the student should be able to: 1. demonstrate an understanding of the comprehensive approach to patients with multi-system critical illness. 2. list the medication, complications and demonstrate the techniques in insertion of arterial, ventral venous and pulmonary artery catheters. 3. present to peers the complex problems of critically ill patients in a logical and comprehensive manner. Responsibilities: Clinical: Alternate every third night call, function in capacity of subintern (no more than 80 hours per week). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily with rounds by surgery or anesthesia attendings. All activities under supervision of residents. Didactic content: Morning rounds, 2-3 weekly sessions by resident, fellow, attendings, respiratory therapy, or pharmacy. Reading and background material provided. Daily teaching sessions with staff. Student is expected to make one didactic presentation of 15-20 minutes. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: By consensus of attendings and house staff. 129
  • 130. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Plastic Surgery Course #: CLNS 761 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Bret Baack, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Gain an understanding of surgical specialty practice and learn about treatment modalities in reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgery. Objectives: Evaluate the physical and psychological condition of the patient presenting for plastic surgery and participate in pre-, intra-, and postoperative care. Responsibilities: Observational: Student participates in clinic and operating room care. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Student is supervised by plastic surgeons. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Superior effort on the part of the student to evaluate and understand the patients’ problems and prepare for and participate in surgery. Additional Information: Student travels to and from VA and Medical Arts. 130
  • 131. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Introduction to Transplantation Course #: CLNS 762 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Antonia Harford, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Antonia Harford, MD Goals and Unique Aspects: Familiarize student with clinical concepts of transplantation immunology. Kidney transplantation portal hypertension surgery and hepatobiliary diseases. Objectives: 1. Care for kidney transplant recipients; 2. Operating room duties in transplant procurements and hepatobiliary surgery; and 3. Clinical research in transplantation. Responsibilities: Observational: All procedures performed on transplant patients, i.e., renal biopsies, transplants, procurements. Clinical: Follow all hepatobiliary consults. Research: Clinical offered. Expected to start clinical project leading to abstract/publications. Teaching: Direct new patients/consults to preceptor. Required: Night call for transplants and procurements. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Direct by Dr. Antonia Harford. Didactic Content: Must attend all education activities in Transplantation Division. Evaluation: Based on clinical observation, oral questions, demonstrated fund of knowledge and written abstract. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: 1. participate in rounds, surgical procedures. 2. integrate him/herself into team. 3. write one abstract. 131
  • 132. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Vascular Surgery Sub-Internship Course #: CLNS 763 Credit: Sub-Internship Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mark Langsfeld, MD John Marek, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Exposure to patients with peripheral vascular disease. Objectives: 1. Master the basic principles of the physical examination of the vascular system. 2. Be able to recognize and diagnose patients with arterial and venous insufficiency. 3. Become familiar with the non-invasive assessment of the arterial and venous circulations. 4. Learn how to interpret an arteriogram. 5. Become familiar with medical and surgical management of patients with diseases of the vascular system. Responsibilities: Clinical: Function in the capacity of a subintern. Optional: participate in ongoing clinical research projects and help prepare a paper or case report for presentation at resident/student research forum. Supervision and Teaching: Pre-op Didactic Content: Vascular Conference every Wednesday at 4:00pm. Vascular Case Conference third Wednesday of the month. Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Conference every Wednesday morning. Amount and type: Daily rounds with attending staff and service. Participate in surgical procedures. Participate in vascular surgery clinics. Evaluation: Evaluation to be determined by vascular house staff and service attending. 132
  • 133. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Pediatric Urology Course #: CLNS 764 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Anthony Smith, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: To assume more responsibility with regard to patient work-up and management on the wards and in the clinic as compared to a Phase II student. To participate in the OR commensurate with his/her ability. Objectives: 1. To enhance the student’s knowledge of the evaluation and management of pediatric urology patients. 2. To recognize pertinent clinical problems and develop appropriate treatment plans. 3. To develop a degree of competency that allows the student to do independent initial evaluations in clinic. 4. To assist in the OR. Responsibilities: Observational: Clinics, OR, inpatient, x-rays, ICU’s. Clinical: Become familiar with all tests and x-rays ordered for pediatric urology patients, and be able to interpret them. Research: Available, but not required. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily with faculty and residents. Didactic Content: Attend all conferences, lectures and VP’s. Required readings. Evaluation: Based on fund of knowledge of urology, quality of patient care, technical ability, comprehension of didactic material and other usual criteria. Criteria for outstanding grade: Demonstration of outstanding fund of knowledge of pediatric urological diseases, technical ability and patient care. Additional Information: This is a unique opportunity to participate in New Mexico’s only comprehensive pediatric urology surgery program. Management of these patients provides invaluable knowledge, which will be used in many other medicine disciplines. 133
  • 134. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery at UNMH Course #: CLNS 765 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Charles Dietl, MD Jorge A. Wernly, MD Said Yassin, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: To have an overall exposure to the field of cardiac and thoracic surgery with strong emphasis on open-heart surgery. Objectives: Student should be able to describe the very basic principles of cardiopulmonary bypass and its application to the management of cardiac surgical problems. He/she should be able to identify the indication and the timing for the surgical intervention in the more common cardiac surgical problems. Describe fundamentals of surgical treatment for common conditions. Responsibilities: Observational: The student is responsible for the work-up of a few patients scheduled for surgery, to observe their surgical procedures, and to observe and participate in their postoperative care. Clinical: The student is expected to participate in daily rounds with the house staff and participate under supervision in all patient management aspects. Night call is not specifically scheduled, but the student should make him/herself available to be called to participate in an occasional emergency surgical procedure. One brief paper on a specific condition of patients in service or other relevant topics is required. Optional: Presentation to Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Education Conference on topic of choice. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily contact with house staff, thoracic resident and attending. Didactic content: Attendance at the Thoracic Surgery Conference as well as the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization Conferences on a weekly basis. Suggested readings will be offered. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Excellence in clinical performance, quality of required papers and brief presentations to education conference. Demonstration of outstanding fund of knowledge, interpersonal relationship and self-education. 134
  • 135. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY General Surgery Teaching Elective Course #: CLNS 766 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Thomas R. Howdieshell, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: Develop student’s teaching skills in general surgery as tutor, on wards, and in clinic. Objectives: Facilitate group discussions during tutorials; learn to provide useful feedback and write useful narrative summaries; learn to prepare short lectures/presentations; learn to recognize different styles of learning and teaching. Develop program for clinic teaching. Responsibilities: Observational: Students direct tutorials and word rounds. Students develop a program for clinic teaching. Teaching: Direct tutorials for Phase II students, head teaching ward rounds on Team A; give short lectures/presentations. Optional: Develop patient education courses/materials in surgery clinic (i.e. breast cancer). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct by Dr. Howdieshell. Evaluation: Self-assessment, Phase II student evaluation, observation by attendings. Additional Information: Students work at off-campus locations. 135
  • 136. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Pediatric Ophthalmology Course #: CLNS 767 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2-4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Mark Wood, MD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships. Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: 1. Learn basic exam techniques. 2. How to use instruments. 3. Understand ophthalmic vocabulary. Objectives: Basic exam techniques with differential for anisocoria, nystagmus, strabismus, red eye, amblyopia, and more. Responsibilities: Observational: All aspects of eye patient care: surgery, procedures, complications. Clinical: Basic eye exams on clinical patients. Research: May be considered. Required: Mastery of basic eye exam. Optional: Hands-on patient exams. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct, by senior faculty. Didactic Content: Handout with suggested reading. Evaluation: Evaluation is based on clinical observations. Criteria for outstanding grade: mastery of eye exam techniques. Additional Information: A 4-week rotation can be scheduled with another specialty. Special arrangements to be made with Dr. Wood for Pediatric Ophthalmology. 136
  • 137. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Adult Cardiothoracic Surgery at VAMC Course #: CLNS 768 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Stuart B. Pett, MD Prerequisites: Phase II Clerkship: Surgery Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: To have an overall exposure to the field of cardiac and thoracic surgery with strong emphasis on open-heart surgery. Objectives: Student should be able to describe the very basic principles of cardiopulmonary bypass and its application to the management of cardiac surgical problems. He/she should be able to identify the indication and the timing for the surgical intervention in the more common cardiac surgical problems. Describe fundamentals of surgical treatment for common conditions. Responsibilities: Observational: The student is responsible for the work-up of a few patients scheduled for surgery, to observe their surgical procedures, and to observe and participate in their postoperative care. Clinical: The student is expected to participate in daily rounds with the house staff and participate under supervision in all patient management aspects. Night call is not specifically scheduled, but the student should make him/herself available to be called to participate in an occasional emergency surgical procedure. One brief paper on a specific condition of patients in service or other relevant topics is required. Optional: Presentation to Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Education Conference on topic of choice. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily contact with house staff, thoracic resident and attending. Didactic content: Attendance at the Thoracic Surgery Conference as well as the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization Conferences on a weekly basis. Suggested readings will be offered. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Excellence in clinical performance, quality of required papers and brief presentations to education conference. Demonstration of outstanding fund of knowledge, interpersonal relationship and self-education. 137
  • 138. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Clinical Applications of Anatomy Course #: CLNS 769 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 24 Maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): Tom Estenson, PhD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: Tom Estenson, PhD Goals and Unique Aspects: To provide clinical correlation of anatomy through discussions of clinical problems, study of relevant anatomy and thorough dissections. Objectives: Course is designed to improve the understanding of anatomy and its clinical relevance for all students regardless of future specialty plans. Responsibilities: Observational: Procedures completed by surgical specialists. Teaching: Presentations to faculty and students. Required: Class participation in discussions and presentations. Students also do extensive dissections. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Surgical and basic science faculty. Didactic content: Anatomy texts, surgical atlases and dissection guides. Evaluation: Attendance, performance in class, and presentations. Grading is Credit/No Credit Additional Information: This course is generally offered during the month of March only. 138
  • 139. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Surgical Specialties Elective Course #: Varies Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2 Weeks Students per Rotation: Varies Faculty Evaluator(s): Various Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Goals and Unique Aspects: These 2 week rotations allow 4th year students to sample surgical subspecialties in a shorter time frame. These are clinical electives with hands-on patient care whose purpose is to introduce the knowledge and skills of the chosen surgical subspecialties OPHTHALMOLOGY Responsibilities: Observational: All aspects of eye patient care: eye surgery, procedures, results, complications. Research: Can be considered. Required: mastery of basic exam, equipment, reading. Optional: Initial triage of emergency patients and consults. Evaluation: By chief resident and faculty. VASCULAR SURGERY Responsibilities: Clinical: Function in the capacity of a subintern. Optional: participate in ongoing clinical research projects and help prepare a paper or case report for presentation at resident/student research forum. Supervision and Teaching: Pre-op Didactic Content: Vascular Conference every Wednesday at 4:00pm. Vascular Case Conference third Wednesday of the month. Weekly Morbidity and Mortality Conference every Wednesday morning. Amount and type: Daily rounds with attending staff and service. Participate in surgical procedures. Participate in vascular surgery clinics. Evaluation: Evaluation to be determined by vascular house staff and service attending. CARDIO-THORACIC SURGERY Responsibilities: Observational: The student is responsible for the work-up of a few patients scheduled for surgery, to observe their surgical procedures, and to observe and participate in their postoperative care. Clinical: The student is expected to participate in daily rounds with the house staff and participate under supervision in all patient management aspects. Night call is not specifically scheduled, but the student should make him/herself available to be called to participate in an occasional emergency surgical procedure. One brief paper on a specific condition of patients in service or other relevant topics is required. Optional: Presentation to Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Education Conference on topic of choice. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Daily contact with house staff, thoracic resident and attending. Didactic content: Attendance at the Thoracic Surgery Conference as well as the Adult and Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization Conferences on a weekly basis. Suggested readings will be offered. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: Excellence in clinical performance, quality of required papers and brief presentations to education conference. Demonstration of outstanding fund of knowledge, interpersonal relationship and self- education. 139
  • 140. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Surgical Specialties Elective (continued) Course #: Varies Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2 Weeks Students per Rotation: Varies Faculty Evaluator(s): Various Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Josh Vanlandingham GENERAL ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY Responsibilities: Observational: While contributing at a student level, observe higher levels of care giving (residents, attendings) in clinic, wards, and operating room. Required: Night call, conference attendance, rounds, clinic and operating room assistance. Optional: Clinical research (case report of interesting case). Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Instruction directly by role model; principal role on ward. Didactic Content: Attend all department conferences. Evaluation: Consensus subjective conclusion of team attendings and residents. Written exam possible. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: Demonstrate knowledge of anatomy and clinical skills; demonstrate excellent acquisition of basic orthopaedic musculoskeletal diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge. Actively and effectively participate in surgical team (rounds, wards clinics, operating room). Excellence in conference participation, to include presentation of cases of patients with musculoskeletal pathology, which demonstrate extensive knowledge of the condition and treatment alternatives. NEUROSURGERY Responsibilities: Observational: Work-up admissions, present cases on rounds, select one topic for review and presentation. Clinical: Admit one to two patients per day, participate in night call once every three days, be an integral part of the care team. Research: Students may elect to become involved in neurosurgical research which includes biomechanics of spinal instrumentation and magnetic source imaging. Teaching: Examination of inpatients presented to chief resident and outpatients presented to attending. Required: Mandatory weekday attendance on surgery and in clinics, Journal Club and Friday conferences. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct supervision by attendings and residents. Didactic content: Daily rounds; conferences twice per week. Evaluation: Evaluation by Howard Yonas, MD. Criteria for outstanding grade: Based on performance and review of a topic. Quality of work-ups, ability to sustain work level, performance in operating room and oral presentation. Additional Information: Student obtains a great deal of practical exposure, assisting on complex cases, suturing and other procedures appropriate to interests and capabilities. UROLOGY Responsibilities: Observational: Participate as an active urology team member, observe procedures and surgeries, and become proficient in minor surgical procedures and in evaluation of more difficult problems. Clinical: Daily task include, but are not limited to, inpatient rounds, evaluating and managing clinic patients, and familiarity with and ability to interpret all tests and imaging modalities. Research: May participate in on- going research projects or initiate a new one. Teaching: Responsible for teaching of junior medical students, and presenting on selected topics to residents and faculty. Required: Function at, or near intern level. Participate in inpatient care, clinics and OR. 140
  • 141. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY Surgical Specialties Elective (continued) Course #: Varies Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 2 Weeks Students per Rotation: Varies Faculty Evaluator(s): Various Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Josh Vanlandingham Take call as determined by Chief Resident. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Faculty and residents closely supervise student’s work on wards, in clinics, or in operating room. In addition to morning rounds teaching, the student attends all urologic conferences and any other didactic teaching sessions. Attendance at weekly grand rounds is required. Evaluation: Based on demonstrated knowledge on wards, in operating room and in clinic as relates to quality of patient care, didactic materials comprehension and technical ability. Criteria for outstanding grade: Demonstrate outstanding fund of knowledge in urological diseases, technical ability and patient care. Base on faculty and resident consensus. Additional Information: This is a unique opportunity to participate in New Mexico’s only comprehensive urologic surgery program. Management of these patients provides invaluable knowledge applicable to many other medicine disciplines. OTOLARYNGOLOGY Responsibilities: Observational: Pediatric head and neck oncology, otology surgical cases, inpatient wards. Clinical: Patient care, consultations, surgery assistance, clinic participation with faculty supervision. Research: Optional. Teaching: Required presentation at first surgical conference; weekly presentations at Monday teaching conferences, and mentoring other medical students. Required: Week on and weekend call, and direct patient care. Optional: Rotation at VA. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and type: Direct by senior faculty and residents. Didactic content: Monday morning teaching conference. Evaluation: Assessment of clinical performance by residents and faculty, and performance on Friday presentations. Criteria for outstanding grade: Based on overall quality of work, presentation at surgical conference and consensus of faculty and residents. 141
  • 142. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION Medical Education Scholarship in Assessment or Curriculum Development Course #: CLNS 894 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1-2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Teresita McCarty, MD Prerequisites: For Assessment Emphasis: Completion of Phase II, successful completion of all SOM assessments required up to the time of the elective. For Curriculum Emphasis: Successful completion of the pertinent portions of the curriculum. Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Teresita McCarty, MD Goals and Unique Aspects: Students will work with Assessment & Learning or the BATCAVE programs to design, carry out, and analyze a scholarly project that focuses on medical education or medical education assessment. Students may create or design learning materials or assessment items for use in clinical teaching or examinations (examples include creating tutorial cases, simulation scenarios, lecture sequences, multiple choice questions, standardized patient cases, authoring Calibrated Peer Review™ assignments, and designing a practical skill station) and evaluate effectiveness. Objectives: In conjunction with faculty and staff the students will design, execute, and evaluate a scholarly project that focuses on medical education. Students will: 1) develop their personal learning objectives, 2) develop the objectives for the project, 3) review the literature pertaining to scholarship in medical education or medical education assessment, 4) implement the project, and 5) evaluate the outcome of the endeavor. Responsibilities: Observational: Students will observe, participate in and lead the processes involved in preparing for a medical education activity or medical education assessment. Clinical: Students will not have clinical duties during the four-week version of this rotation. No call is required. Research: Students will be able to participate in various ongoing scholarly research projects if consistent with the goals of their elective. Teaching: Curricular planning, lecturing, tutoring, writing cases (tutorial or assessment), and assessing, are all possible activities depending on the particular project selected. Additionally, students will present the results of their project to Assessment & Learning or to appropriate faculty committees. Required: Students will be required to meet regularly with the Director of Assessment and/or a designated curriculum leader and to attend the curricular activities associated with the project. Optional: Students will be afforded an opportunity to attend any Teacher and Educational Development or other HSC workshops that are offered during the rotation. Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: Direct supervision by Director of Assessment, Teresita McCarty, MD or designated faculty educator. Didactic Content: Students will be expected to read the current literature pertaining to their chosen scholarly project, and will be afforded the 142
  • 143. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. DEPARTMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION Medical Education Scholarship in Assessment or Curriculum Development (continued) Course #: CLNS 894 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1-2 Faculty Evaluator(s): Teresita McCarty, MD Prerequisites: For Assessment Emphasis: Completion of Phase II, successful completion of all SOM assessments required up to the time of the elective. For Curriculum Emphasis: Successful completion of the pertinent portions of the curriculum. Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Teresita McCarty, MD Supervision and Teaching (continued): opportunity to attend any Teacher and Educational Development workshops offered during the rotation. During this rotation, students are expected to attend various curriculum and education scholarship committees such as Clinical Skills, Communication Skills, and Cross-Cutting Issues committee meetings. Evaluation: Using scoring rubrics agreed upon by the student(s) assessment will be based on skill and creativity in designing, carrying out, and analyzing a scholarly project; on presentation of the project to a faculty committee, and on professionalism demonstrated during the rotation. Student(s) will also perform self-assessment and receive formative feedback half-way through the rotation and summative feedback at the end of the rotation. Criteria for Outstanding Grade: In order to receive an “Outstanding” grade, students must develop or produce an innovative or excellent product that could add to the scholarly literature, that adds to the educational resources of the learning community and that others will continue to use and to build upon. 143
  • 144. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. OFFICE OF GLOBAL HEALTH International Rotations Course #: CLNS 897 and CLNS 896 Credit: Elective Duration: Variable Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Office of Medical Student Affairs International Electives – Clinical DEPARTMENT OF GLOBAL HEALTH IFMSA Elective Course #: CLNS 897 Credit: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: Varies Faculty Evaluator(s): TBD Prerequisites: Completion of All Phase II Clerkships, Phase III Student Standing Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Office of Medical Student Affairs Additional Information: Please contact the Office of Global Health via Medical Student Affairs for more information. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Maternal and Child Health in Guatemala Course #: CLNS 655 Credit: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): Lawrence Leeman, MD, Eve Espey, MD Prerequisites: See Additional Information Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Shawne Riley Goals and Unique Aspects: To experience the realities of delivering maternal/child/women’s health in a developing country. Objectives: To enhance clinical skills in OB/GYN, improve Spanish language skills, and participate in a population based project related to maternal/child health. Responsibilities: Observational: OB/GYN-Neonatal Care in a developing nation setting. Clinical: Enhancement of clinical/physical diagnosis skills in a setting with minimal technologic back-up services. Research: Effect of traditional birth attendant training on maternal/neonatal mortality. Barriers to access of care in rural Guatemala. Teaching: 144
  • 145. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Interact/teach/role model with 5th and 6th year Guatemalan medical students. Required: Rounds, conferences, at least one 24 hour call at least once per week. Optional: Explore Guatemala! Supervision and Teaching: Amount and Type: By Guatemalan faculty/residents in OB/GYN. Sergio Flores, MD, is the preceptor in Guatemala. Didactic Content: Daily morning conferences. If Spanish language improvement is needed, attend one of 39 Spanish language schools in Quetzaltenango. Evaluation: Based on evaluation by faculty and written report/project after return. Criteria for outstanding grade: Quality of project/report and evaluation of faculty. Additional Information: Preferably have completed all of Phase II, but will consider if Phase II Ob/Gyn, Medicine, and Pediatrics are complete. Fluency in basic Spanish is required. Student must cover all travel and living expenses. Need to consult UNM travel medicine clinic for required vaccinations. Must contact UNM Office of International Programs and Studies (main campus) for foreign travel insurance and safety issues discussion. U.S. passport required (tourist visa obtained at airport). See department for suggested reading list. DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Maternal Fetal Medicine in Sierra Leone Course #: CLNS 659 Credit: Elective: Clinical Duration: 4 Weeks Students per Rotation: 1 Faculty Evaluator(s): TBD Prerequisites: Completion of all Phase II Clerkships Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: OBGYN Goals and Unique Aspects: To experience and understand the difference in the provision of medical care in an underdeveloped country and its impact on maternal and fetal health. Objectives: To participate in a project related to maternal-fetal health. To become familiar with models of health care delivery different from the United States model. Responsibilities: Observational: Obstetric/Gynecologic care in a developing country. Required Research: Student project. Teaching: The first week of the course will consist of sessions with the preceptor to design a student project. Supervision and Teaching: Supervision by the course director and nursing staff on the outreach team. Evaluation: Criteria for outstanding grade: For an outstanding grade the student must demonstrate the ability to work with the outreach team, but also be able to coordinate and manage a student project. 145
  • 146. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Additional Information: Please contact the OBGYN Dept for specific dates. Student must cover all travel and living expenses. Need to consult UNM travel clinic for required vaccinations. Must contact UNM Office of Itnernational Programs and Students for foreign travel, insurance and saftey information. United States Passport is requried. DEPARTMENT OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Senior Clerkship in Tropical Medicine and Emerging Diseases: Rajkot, India Course #: CLNS 897 Credit: Clinical Duration: 8 Weeks Students per Rotation: 6 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): Dr. Ravi Durvasula Prerequisites: Completion of Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Surgery, and OBGYN. Sub-I in Medicine preferred, but not required. Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Dr. Ravi Durvasula Goals and Unique Aspects: The Senior Clerkship in Tropical Medicine and Emerging Diseases aims to provide structured education to senior medical students in relevant areas of global health. The focus of the clerkship will be on major infectious disease syndromes of the tropics. However, additional focus on evolving trends in global health such as new epidemics in chronic diseases will be provided. The setting for this clerkship is the vibrant city of Rajkot, India. Rajkot is one of the fastest growing cities in the world with a current population of 1.5 million people. Located in the state of Gujarat, Rajkot epitomizes the emerging nature of India and provides an ideal backdrop for UNM trainees to witness transformational forces in global health care. The Municipal Hospital where this clerkship will take place is a very large public facility with over 800 teaching beds. Despite rapid growth of modern private facilities in Rajkot, this hospital provides free care to underserved sectors of the population and will allow UNM trainees the opportunity to participate in care for indigent populations with unique health care needs. Objectives: Structured clinical education for students in major infectious syndromes of developing world. Familiarity with clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, malaria, dengue fever, infectious diarrheal syndromes, tropical dermatologic syndromes, HIV in the tropics. Structured, curriculum-driven education in amnilatory and ward settings at a major urban teaching hospital in India. Multi-disciplinary experience with focus on Internal Medicine but options for clinical training in surgery, OBGYN, pediatrics, dermatology, pathology, radiology. Exposure to "alternative" models of healthcare delivery in a cross-cultural setting with experience in therapeutic yoga, Ayurvedic medicine and other holistic practices. Cultural enrichment of UNM students with immersion experience in India with exposure to the peoples, language, religions and cultural practices of Gujarat. Responsibilities: Senior medical students who are selected for this clerkship will participate in structured rotations on the teaching services of Rajkot Medical College. Ward and clinic format at the major teaching sites will approximate UNMH structure with academic attending physicians, senior and junior residents and medical students delivering care in a team environment. Elective students will be expected to assess patients either in ward or clinic settings and present findings to supervising residents and attending physicians. The language of instruction is English and students will be expected to provide case 146
  • 147. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. reports and histories in English during teaching rounds. At certain times, house staff from UNM Department of Medicine- residents and fellows- may be present during the student rotation. Additionally, clinical faculty from the UNM Global Health Program may be involved in components of student supervision. The majority of the education and clinical supervision will be provided by faculty and house staff of Rajkot Medical College. Elective students are expected to conform to practices of the host institution and will be encouraged to join their Indian counterparts in student activities. Supervision and Teaching: Full-time faculty of Rajkot Medical College will provide supervision and training of UNM medical students. Noindependent practice opportunities will be available and all clinical care conducted by students will be in supervised settings. Faculty from Rajkot Medical College will be adjunct members of UNM School of Medicine and will be familiar with the training objectives of the UNM curriculum. Evaluation: This senior elective will be graded on a Credit/No Credit structure only. Satisfactory participation in all training components in India will be required. Upon return to UNM, students will be given a final exam. The exam will consist of multiple choice questions designed to crystallize the 8 week experience and allow students to integrate their didactic and clinical experiences. This exam will be graded as Pass/Fail only. Dr. Ravi Durvasula, coordinator of this elective, will oversee the evaluation process by collecting written evaluations from Rajkot Medical College faculty and reviewing student performance on the final exam. Dr. Durvasula will submit final grades for the student. Additional Information: Please contact the department for offering dates. International Electives – Non-Clinical DEPARTMENT OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE International Emergency Medicine - Nepal Course #: CLNS 833 Credit: Elective: Non-Clinical Duration: 4-5 Weeks Students per Rotation: 12 maximum Faculty Evaluator(s): David Wachter, MD Prerequisites: Accepting Visiting Students: Yes Contact: David Wachter, MD Goals and Unique Aspects: See objectives. Objectives: To examine the major barriers to health and provision of medical care in Nepal which are common to other Developing Countries using selected readings, on-site study and discussions; To explore approaches to overcoming those barriers through site visits and discussions; To learn to diagnose and treat problems commonly encountered in Travel/Tropical medicine and Altitude/Mountaineering Medicine through readings, discussions and first hand experience in the mountains; To learn to use ultrasound for emergency medical diagnosis and as an adjunct to treatment in a resource limited setting. 147
  • 148. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. Responsibilities: We will visit teaching hospitals in Kathmandu and Dharan, in which we will co-host courses in emergency ultrasound and important aspects of trauma care with our Nepali colleagues. We will also teach ultrasound in smaller hospitals and clinics in rural settings. Students will initially attend conferences as trainees, and will help with presentations and hands-on labs as the month progresses. Bedside rounds in emergency departments and clinics, discussing cases with local health care providers and introducing them to the use of diagnostic bedside ultrasound. We will visit traditional medical clinics where we will be given lectures on Ayurvedic medicine, Tibetan medicine and Chinese medicine/Acupuncture by experts in those fields. The group will travel to the jungle preserve of Chitwan national park where lectures will be given on Malaria, Kala Azar, and other tropical diseases, as well as other common local emergency medical problems such as cobra and krait envenomations and organohosphate poisoning. Supervision and Teaching: Lectures and practical training sessions will be directly taught by faculty, including emergency Physicians from the US and Nepal, as well as practitioners of traditional medicine. Due to the brief exposure to the local medical system and culture, students will not perform independent clinical work, but will gain clinical experience through group rounds led by faculty from Nepal and the US. Discussionson reading material and site visits will be led by course faculty. Evaluation: Students will be assessed by faculty coordinator based on observation of participation in discussions and performance in hands-on training (ultrasound and trauma labs). They will also be given a final examination covering key concepts. “Outstanding” grade will be given to those who show exceptional initiative and superior understanding of core subject matter, participate effectively in conferences and trainings, and perform in the top quartile on the final exam (must meet all of above criteria). Additional Information: This course is only available in the fall. Contact the department for specific dates. Please seehttp://web.mac.com/drwachter/iWeb/Nepal%20Page/Itinerary%20Fall%202009%20 (tentative).html for more information. 148
  • 149. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. PRECEPTORSHIP OFFICE New Mexico Preceptorship Course #: CLNS 910 Credit: Preceptorship Duration: 4 Weeks Accepting Visiting Students: No Contact: Ann Thibodeaux Who: All fourth year medical students are required to participate in the rural preceptorship Why: The purpose of the rural experience is to allow the student to experience medical care in rural areas throughout New Mexico in private practice as well as community health clinics and Indian Hospitals and in all different subspecialties. The experience may assist the student in making a decision about a career choice. What/When/Where: NM Preceptorship is a four-week rotation beginning the first block of the fourth year and ending April before graduation. There is a minimum of 96 hours attendance requirement during this rotation. A student may do an elective in addition to the required rotation if the schedule permits. There are sites throughout the state. There are required didactics and conferences that are being developed and will be implemented during 2010-2011 school year. These will be in Albuquerque and may impact the day you start your clinical work. This is a pilot project and details were not available at time of publication. Contact the Preceptorship Office for more information. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS Do I have a choice of where I am placed? Yes. You will have the same lottery number as in CC-III. This time around it will be reversed. You will be given a catalog with the list of physicians, specialties/subspecialties and practice descriptions. There are previous students' evaluations of the preceptors for your review to help you make a decision. You will submit requests and then advised of your selection several weeks prior to Block I. Where will I live? You can stay with family or friends or you can find your own housing. You will pay rent directly and submit a housing receipt which will be processed for reimbursement. A round trip travel allowance will be given at the end of the rotation. What are the requirements? 96 hours minimum attendance, a community service project (similar to PIE), a completed evaluation of the preceptor and the program, a completed evaluation from the preceptor along with the signed certification, a one page form, "Expectations of Rural Preceptorship”, weekly participation in Project Echo, patient encounters on STROLS, Can I reschedule a rotation? Rural rotations will only be rescheduled under extreme circumstances. We have made firm commitments to preceptors and you are expected to honor your commitment. Once a student is scheduled for a specific rotation, it is binding to the same extent as other clinical 149
  • 150. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. rotations. If the date is to be changed, the request must be approved by the Office of Medical Student Affairs and an add/drop slip must be submitted. My father/mother/uncle/relative has suggested a doctor in my home town that would like to be my preceptor. Can I do this? You are encouraged to choose the preceptors in the catalog, all approved volunteer faculty. There are situations, however, when we will accommodate a preceptor who would like to apply for the volunteer faculty position. There is paperwork that must be submitted with approval at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the rotation. My husband/wife/partner/child(ren)/pet wants to accompany me while I am out of town. Is this OK? Of course. This would be an agreement between you and the housing provider. Important things to remember: Four to five weeks prior to the rotation, our office sends a reminder letter to your preceptor along with a copy of the short biographical form you have provided and your photo. There is a letter sent to the hospital(s) with a copy of your immunization record and your photo to advise you will be making rounds with the preceptor. The week before your rotation begins you will pick up a packet that has been prepared for you with copies of the letters and all the requirements. The evaluation from your preceptor is sent to Medical Student Affairs and a copy is kept in your file in this office. NEW MEXICO PRECEPTORSHIP The fourth year preceptorship is a RURAL ROTATION. Anyone requesting to stay in or near Albuquerque will contact Brian Solan, MD directly. BSolan@Salud.unm.edu Lottery numbers will remain the same as CC-III but the order reversed. Requirements for the Preceptorship A completed community service project and project report entered into STROLS. A completed evaluation of the preceptor and the program entered into STROLS. Patient encounters entered into STROLS. Weekly participation in Project ECHO. Completed one page form, “Expectations of NM Preceptorship”. A completed evaluation from the preceptor. A completed certification by the preceptor stating that the student has worked a minimum of 96 hours during the four week period. Student Folder: The week prior to the beginning of each block, the student is requested to pick up a folder that will include the requirement forms and a copy of the curriculum for Phase III. Included in the curriculum are details regarding the completion of all requirements. Housing and Travel: Housing expenses will be reimbursed up to various maximum amounts depending on the area of NM. Budgetary limits do not allow us to reimburse students for utilities and/or phone above and beyond the rental agreement. A round trip travel allowance will be given to the student at the end of the rotation. Scheduling Information: Please do not contact the preceptors listed in the catalog. There is a file cabinet in our 150
  • 151. The University of New Mexico School of Medicine Phase III Clerkship Catalog :: 2010-2011 The University of New Mexico School of Medicine reserves the right to make changes to any of the policies, procedures, codes, standards, requirements, or services included in this handbook as it deems necessary, with the changes applicable to all students in attendance at the School of Medicine. office with student evaluations of all preceptors and programs. You are welcome to check these out any time you wish. Thank you in advance for your cooperation. You will be in contact with your chosen preceptor prior to the beginning of the rotation. Rotations will only be rescheduled under extreme circumstances. We have made firm commitments to preceptors and you are expected to honor your commitment to the times/dates that you have chosen. Once a student is scheduled for a specific rotation, it is binding to the same extent as other clinical rotations. Any cancellations must be requested at least 45 days in advance of the start of the rotation. Students are expected to turn in the site selection and biographical form by the deadline – These forms will be sent electronically along with the site selection information in mid- January and hard copies can will be available in the preceptorship office. Anyone not meeting the deadline will lose the lottery number and subsequent placement will be done after the entire class has been scheduled. PRECEPTOR INFORMATION The Preceptorship Office sends out a catalog of preceptors to all eligible students in December. If you need updated or further information, please email Ms. Thibodeaux at AThibode@salud.unm.edu 151