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DATA FOR STATE EMERGENCY PLANNING AND RESPONSE

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  • The destination (LSU hospital) is reached by the Google Earth flythrough (tour) feature.
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DATA FOR STATE EMERGENCY PLANNING AND RESPONSE DATA FOR STATE EMERGENCY PLANNING AND RESPONSE Presentation Transcript

  • DATA FOR STATE EMERGENCY PLANNING AND RESPONSE NSGIC September 23 - 27, 2007 Madison, WI
  • Key Points
    • It’s about more than points on a map
    • Ongoing, consistent data collection is key
    • Detailed contact information greatly extends the value of the data layers
    • “All source” methodology is critical
  • Background – IONIC
    • Founded in 1999
    • Located in Alexandria, VA
    • A leading provider of Open Geospatial ® Web Services software and author of numerous OGC standards
    • Partner with MCH to spatially-enable MCH’s list data and to bring the data to the federal/state geospatial community
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Background – MCH
    • Founded 1928
    • Located in Sweet Springs, MO, just east of Kansas City
    • Privately owned
    • Leading provider of US “institutions” databases
    • Compiles all data
    • in US Sweet Springs facility
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Review: Places2protect
    • 14 Vector Data Layers Available Through NGA/DHS HSIP
      • Many are Tele Atlas rooftop points
      • All layers include feature detail for State planning
    • Viewing access to State Homeland Security community through ICAV
    • Additional attributes may be captured on a State-by-State basis
    • Additional layers available
  • Current Layers Available to States
    • Emergency Medical
      • Hospitals
      • Urgent Care Centers
      • Ambulance Services
    • Emergency Response and Relief
      • County Health Departments
      • Red Cross Chapters
      • Police
      • Fire Stations
    • Other Medical
      • Handicapped Children/Residential Treatment Centers
      • Nursing/Retirement Homes
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Current Layers Available to States (Cont’d)
    • Places Where There are Children
      • Schools
      • Child Care
      • Handicapped Children/Residential Treatment Centers
    • Senior Care
      • Nursing & Retirement Homes
    • Colleges and Universities
    • Jails and Correctional Facilities
    • Churches
    • Domestic Violence Shelters
    • Runaway and Homeless Shelters
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints 5/30/2006
  • Data Compilation Methodology
    • MCH compiles and verifies institutional information from a wide range of sources
      • Telephone surveys
      • Printed and internet directories
      • State and regional licensing data
      • Association membership listings
      • Web crawlers
    • MCH clients are reimbursed for providing information on closed facilities and address changes
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Year-to-Date Compilation Statistics HSIP Data
    • Received 15,470 address corrections through “Nixie” return program
    • Modified data for 230,658 institutions in HSIP layers
    • Each institution touched 1.44 times
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • In Depth Use Case Emergency Preparation
  • © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  •  
  •  
  • Threatened Region At a Glance
    • Captive Populations:
    • 25 Nursing Homes
    • 65 Elementary Schools
    • 14 Middle/ Jr. High
    • 8 High Schools
    • 5 Retirement/ Ass’t Living
    • 2 Special Needs Children Homes
    • 80 Child Care Centers
    • 1 Correctional Facility
    • 2 Community Colleges
    • 1 University
    • EMS Available:
    • 5 Hospitals: 3 General, 1 Pediatric and Rehabilitative only
    • 8 Ambulance Services
    • 6 Main Fire Stations
    • 15 Nursing Homes with Skilled Beds capacity
    • 5 Urgent Care Centers
    • 9 Ambulatory Surgery Centers
    • 150 Large Churches to double as shelters.
  • Under the Points
    • Sample Elementary School:
    • Public School under a unified district
    • Grades K-6
    • Has 430 Children enrolled
    • Has a Child Care on premises with an additional 50 children
    • Has a school-age Before and After School Program
    • Opens early in the Year: August 15
    • Special Needs students are also enrolled at the school
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Under the Points
    • Sample Child Care:
    • Capacity: 50
    • Has an infant care program
    • Also has a B/A School Program
    • Controlled by an outside corporate firm
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Under the Points
    • Sample Nursing Home
    • 105 Beds
    • 25 Skilled Beds
    • Owned by city Diocese
    • Contains an Alzheimer's-Care unit
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Under the Points
    • Sample: General Hospital:
    • Most centrally located to captive populations
    • Capacity: 1,000 Beds
    • Contains Blood Bank, Trauma Center and ICU
    • Lacking: Pediatric ICU
    © 2007 IONIC Enterprise & MCH GeoPoints
  • Taking Action
    • Involve school districts by calling Superintendents and list of Ass’t Supts:
      • What schools need assistance evacuating? Can the High Schools help themselves?
      • Can also involve the Principals – what schools need the most help?
    • Where is the closest Pediatric ICU in worst case scenarios?
    • Where can we perform triage if the hospitals are at capacity? What other surgery centers and clinics are in the area?
    • Who are the ER Directors at the hospitals and do they have a plan for overflow?
    • Are the cities Rescue Squads and Ambulance Services going to be able to handle the emergency? Are there locations in neighboring localities that can be called on for help?
  • Other Considerations
    • How does the scenario change with the time of year; the time of day?
    • What facilities can be grouped into one phone call as opposed to making 20 (districts, diocese operations, corporate child cares, etc)?
    • How is the city going to handle special needs, the very young, terminal patients?
  • Summary
    • It’s about more than points on a map
    • Ongoing, consistent data collection is key
    • Detailed contact information greatly extends the value of the data layers
    • “All source” methodology is critical
  • Contact
    • Eddie Pickle
    • IONIC Enterprise
    • 703-535-5973
    • [email_address]
    • Mary English
    • MCH GeoPoints
    • 816-448-3352
    • [email_address]