• Like

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION IN TANZANIA

  • 633 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
633
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION IN TANZANIA
    • By
    • Senga K Pemba, PhD
        • Director, TTCIH, Ifakara
        • 16/05/2008
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
    • In Tanzania CONTINUING EDUCATION started in 1981 when a pilot CME Project was established in Arusha town under the support of the African Medical and Research Foundation (AMREF).
    • CME has ever since expanded. To date CME has been decentralised into eight Zonal Training Centres. Moreover CME has now been included in the National Health Policy
  • 3. THE DEFINITION OF CME
    • CME is defined as all learning opportunities that can be taken up after initial education
    • CME is determined by a number of factors: motivation to learn, intention to learn and learning behaviour
    • CME should be viewed as an agent for change
    • Currently CME has been transformed to Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
  • 4. WHY CME IN TANZANIA?
    • Knowledge in the field of medicine is rapidly changing as new diseases appear and disease management strategies developed
    • The general public has of recent been more deeply and widely concerned over professional inadequacies
    • It is important for the health profession to establish and strengthen ways of updating and maintaining professional competencies to meet the public’s expectations
  • 5. FACTS ABOUT HUMAN RESOURCES
    • The Human Resource is the most important of all the assets of an organisation
    • Human beings are not recurrent costs but valuable assets
    • Like other assets, human resources are prone to depreciation
    • Their value can and should be increased through a process of continuous, systematic and planned education and training
  • 6. ORGANISATION OF CME IN TANZANIA
    • To ensure a wide coverage of the learners in a vast country like Tanzania, CME has been decentralised into eight zones: Northern Zone, Central Zone, Eastern Zone, Southern Zone, Southern Highland Zone, Southern Western Zone, Lake Zone and Western Zone
    • Each Zonal Training Centre has adequate teaching facilities, hostels and a library.
    • MUHAS, KCMC and TTCIH have their own CME Units
  • 7. SOME SPECIFIC PRIORITIES FOR CME
    • Leadership and management training
    • Research Methodology
    • Teaching Methodology
    • Health Sector Reform
    • Prevention and Control of Malaria, HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Nutritional deficiencies
    • Medical ethics
    • IMCI, Reproductive health
    • Quality Assurance
  • 8. CURRENTLY EXISTING CME APPROACHES
    • Refresher courses conducted by training institutions
    • Distance Education Modules
    • Hospital-based clinical meetings
    • Scientific conferences and seminars
    • Scientific journals and newsletters
    • In service training. This is the mostly preferred method
    • On the job training/supervision
    • Workshops organised by PHC Programmes/NGOs
  • 9. BENEFITS OF CONT. EDUCATION
    • Increased self esteem and confidence
    • Improved performance
    • Analytical thinking brings opportunities for job enrichment
    • Aids career development
    • Creative thinking and personal mastery
    • Reflective practice is motivating and relieves stress
    • Financial reward
  • 10. COSTS FOR NOT DOING CME/CPD
    • Loss of professional standing and recognition
    • Loss of self esteem and confidence
    • Loss of support from within the profession
    • Inability to compete with fellow professionals
    • Lack of job satisfaction
    • No career path
    • Inability to benefit from transferable skills
    • Inability to demonstrate skill
  • 11. MAIN CONSTRAINTS FOR IMPLEMENTING CME/CPD IN TANZANIA
    • Financial resources. Funds are not adequate
    • Resource persons are not there to act as mentors/facilitators
    • Shortage of learning materials
    • Lack of overall strategy for CME
    • Lack of training facilities especially in remote places
    • Lack of communication facilities for distance learners
    • Lack of time
    • Heavy commitment to practice
    • Preference to more conventional methods
    • Need to take care or preserve family life .
    •