Creating Creative Superteams

24,730
-1

Published on

What are the best ways to create creative superteams? These are teams that are able to effectively communicate and collaborate to create even better solutions to huge challenges. In this talk presented at HOW Design Live 2014, I shared different tools that I use as part of how I lead project teams to build trust, create shared norms, and encourage dialogue in the service of creating more powerful design work.

9 Comments
193 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • @gwwaters I think you mean 'norming' and 'storming' are switched? That was deliberate. In the talk, I spoke about how the team can 'pre-norm' before they start formally working to see what issues may cause storming, and start working on them with the team right away.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • @Carrie Krause The 'ladder of abstraction' refers to whether you are talking about something detail oriented within a design, rather than being zoomed out to the more abstract concepts or ideas being discussed in the design work. It's a tool that is used frequently in nonfiction writing/journalism to help writers know when to zoom into the details or to make more general statements about a group of people or society at large. Rough and refined wireframes refer to artifacts designers use to sketch out user interface solutions, the rough ones might be hand sketched or low fidelity and the refined ones may have greater detail.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Thanks a lot for your sharing, it is a great presentation and very useful.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • David, Much of what your presentation recommends are skills we work to instill in the youth that participate in Destination Imagination. I plan to share this presentation with the volunteer team managers to give them more perspective on what it takes to develop a team that works well together and can formulate creative solutions to the Challenge the team has chosen to solve. Destination Imagination is the world's largest creative problem solving program that strives to inspire and equip students to become the next generation of innovators and leaders. Learn more at http://destinationimagination.org/
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I liked this very much. Also wish I had audio. A couple of questions. 1. On slide 47 you mention 'ladder of abstraction'. How do you define this in your presentation? 2. What do you mean on the charts when you discuss rough and refined wire frames?
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
24,730
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
42
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
9
Likes
193
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Creating Creative Superteams

  1. Image 12916031 by Wok on Flickr / CC Attribution 2.0 License creating creative SUPERTEAMS David Sherwin | @changeorder | davidsherwin.com ©2014 David Sherwin. All rights reserved.
  2. the world’s largest air guitar ensemble
  3. 2,377 performers at San Manuel Indian Bingo & Casino's annual Rock n' Roll Bingo event more info at http://bit.ly/1v0XxV
  4. the world’s largest designer air guitar ensemble
  5. This Is It - Beat It (Solo) - Michael Jackson & Orianthi / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3C-xpkyK_o
  6. you all rock!
  7. was that easy? was that hard? why?
  8. what superteams need: trust shared norms dialogue adaptive learning
  9. what tools do I use to create creative superteams?
  10. the constraints: multidisciplinary teams cross-location talent build the brief as you go extreme collaboration
  11. form norm storm perform Framework from Bruce Tuckman’s article “Developmental sequence in small groups.” Psychological Bulletin 63.
  12. form norm storm perform Framework from Bruce Tuckman’s article “Developmental sequence in small groups.” Psychological Bulletin 63.
  13. form norm storm perform Skill Share Team Norms The Four- Player Model Timeboxing Framework from Bruce Tuckman’s article “Developmental sequence in small groups.” Psychological Bulletin 63.
  14. form norm storm perform Skill Share Team Norms TimeboxingThe Four- Player Model
  15. how you work values interests hobbies skills learning style habits
  16. these things are rarely communicated.
  17. conversation about how a team works? it works!
  18. here’s how you can do it.
  19. fill out a sheet of paper with this information.
  20. who am I? (name, hometown, position on the team) my work style my skills my hobbies/interests my goals for this project/collaboration
  21. who am I? (name, hometown, position on the team) my work style my skills my hobbies/interests my goals for this project/collaboration David Fairfax ,VA creative lead user research information architecture wireframing motion prototyping visual design drumming rock climbing yoga dark chocolate eating create structures to improvise, work hrs 9-6 PM learn how to model responsive content for smart watches
  22. share your info with the group. everyone else listens.
  23. “I’d rather get to work than do a skill share…”
  24. form norm Skill Share Team Norms storm perform The Four- Player Model Timeboxing
  25. get a bigger sheet of paper (or whiteboard).
  26. team name & members team normsteam skills team hobbies/interests
  27. team name & members team skills team hobbies/interests David, Fred, Amy, Jen, Alice user research** info arch wireframing motion prototyping visual design*** PM’ing front end dev** database dev back-end dev volunteering**** foosball running** painting pour-over coffee field trips to art galleries*** team norms
  28. when you want to work how long? how often? for what durations? how you want to work collaboratively? alone? balancing the two? encouraging growth what goals and skills do you want to learn? team life/work balance what activities encourage individual/group reflection? types of team norms
  29. team name & members team skills team hobbies/interests David, Fred, Amy, Jen, AliceDavid, Fred, Amy, Jen, Alice user research** info arch wireframing motion prototyping visual design*** PM’ing front end dev** database dev back-end dev volunteering**** foosball running** painting pour-over coffee field trips to art galleries*** 1. Work 10 AM-7 PM 2. Need 3 hrs heads down time every day 3. Open critiques required every morning 4. All of us learn CSS 5. Friday field trips for inspiration 6. Telework Tuesdays 7. Client meetings only Tuesday through Thursday team norms
  30. post it publicly so you hold yourself to your norms.
  31. revise this every time your team changes.
  32. form norm perform Skill Share Team Norms Timeboxing storm The Four- Player Model
  33. storming happens when teams avoid dialogue
  34. productive dialogue requires four stances
  35. “here’s a direction I think we can take…” MOVE
  36. “I’m going to help make that idea happen…” FOLLOW
  37. (I need to think… is this the right thing to do next?) BYSTAND
  38. “I don’t think that’s a good idea, for these reasons…” OPPOSE
  39. MOVE without movers, there is no direction FOLLOWBYSTAND OPPOSE without followers, there is no completion without opposers, there is no correction without bystanders, there is no perspective The Four-Player Model Four-Player Framework by David Kantor
  40. be aware of your stance.
  41. shift stances to advance team goals (not agendas).
  42. “Hey, you’ve been quiet. What do you think?” “So, what I’m hearing is…” “Yes, and…” “Want to help lead this?” Four-Player Framework by David Kantor Cues to Shift A Person’s Stance MOVE FOLLOWBYSTAND OPPOSE
  43. “structure determines behavior” —Peter Senge
  44. collaboration structures expand or limit team dialogue working individually MOVE (OPPOSE) working in parallel MOVE (OPPOSE) working in the round MOVE FOLLOW (OPPOSE) design improv MOVE FOLLOW BYSTAND (OPPOSE)
  45. design critique is challenging FOLLOWBYSTAND OPPOSE
  46. moving beyond the crap sandwich of design critique 1. Ask if someone would like to enter into a critique, and when to start (right now? later?) 2. Set a time limit + goal for what you want to accomplish in the critique: refine? combine? extend? downselect? 3. Capture the criteria for excellence as you go (it varies based on what you’re critiquing) 4. Know where you are on the “ladder of abstraction” 5. Capture in writing every new idea that’s created during the critique
  47. form norm storm Skill Share Team Norms The Four- Player Model perform Timeboxing
  48. timeboxing: short structured sprints to reach stated goals
  49. when should I use timeboxing? 1. you need to align and motivate your team 2. deadline is only a few hours away 3. challenge seems too big to tackle 4. it's hard to focus on getting things done
  50. types of timeboxes what to do how long you’ll do it required output desired fidelity ACT ARTICULATE what else needs to be done? how much time will it take? what output is needed? what fidelity is required? EVALUATE did you do it? do you need more time? was the output appropriate? should the fidelity be changed?
  51. types of timeboxes generate low-fi design ideas do it for 10 minutes at least 8 ideas sketches on Post-Its created low-fi design ideas did it for 10 minutes created 10 ideas!! sketches on Post-Its want to go deeper on 3 topics discovered in previous timebox write names of 3 topics create 10 ideas for each sketches on Post-Its ACT ARTICULATEEVALUATE
  52. example: technoyoga
  53. first action: planning how to use your time
  54. be willing to adapt based on new information
  55. increase the fidelity? increase the challenge.
  56. why timeboxing works
  57. why timeboxing works
  58. why timeboxing works
  59. form norm storm perform Skill Share Team Norms The Four- Player Model Timeboxing
  60. Retrospectives storm perform ms The Four- Player Model Timeboxing adjourn
  61. how did it feel? what did you learn?
  62. the emotional seismograph
  63. HAPPY UNHAPPY TIME Couldn’t think of ideas Excited to get started We settled on an idea John and I argued over the typeface Made up! Push to finish Strong final presentation!
  64. lessons learned
  65. what worked well for us? what could be improved next time? what didn’t work so well?
  66. write down your personal lessons learned individually
  67. share your lessons learned + merge them onto one sheet. as a group
  68. what worked well for us? what could be improved next time? what didn’t work so well? We didn’t manage internal client expectations on the time necessary to make some big changes at the last minute Team had great energy, critiques were awesome Happy with the end product that we shipped Clearly communicate timelines to internal clients Hold fast to what team’s capable of under time constraints *** *
  69. so, how do you create creative superteams?
  70. our teams have to: 1. create explicit trust 2. agree to shared norms 3. foster open dialogue 4. learn from failure
  71. be systematic about how teams communicate & collaborate
  72. teams need (just enough) structure to perform
  73. superteams work best when they feel the rhythm
  74. Photo 377872266 by Kevin Delaney on Flickr Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic leading from the front?
  75. Photo 377872266 by Kevin Delaney on Flickr Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic providing the feel
  76. THANK YOU ©2014 David Sherwin. All rights reserved. and keep on rocking! david@changeorderblog.com @changeorder changeorderblog.com get the slides for this talk at slideshare.net/changeorder

×