29. yeats
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29. yeats

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29. yeats 29. yeats Presentation Transcript

  • William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) William Butler Yeats.
    • 1865 : born in Dublin, Ireland, into a middle-class family belonging to the Protestant minority .
    • 1890s : met Lady Gregory who supported his project regardingthe Abbey Theatre .
    • 1893 : published a series of essays, The Celtic Twilight , to promote an Irish renaissance .
    W. B. Yeats 1. Life Only Connect ... New Directions
    • He was a member of the Irish Senate from 1922 to 1928 .
    • In December 1923 he was the first Irish author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
    • He died in Menton, France in 1939 .
    W. B. Yeats 1. Life Only Connect ... New Directions View slide
    • The early period  languid and sensual atmospheres of the Romantics and the decadent artists. Use of Irish folklore and influence of the French Symbolists and William Blake .
    • The middle period (beginning of the 20th century)  more modern and flexible style, started to conceive symbols as means to evoke universal myths .
    • The later period (years of maturity)  creation of his own vision .
    2. The 3 phases of Yeats’s art W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions View slide
    • Life and all of its phases
    • =
    • cycles spiralling upwards or downwards towards a fixed climax
    • the cycle reverses
    3. Yeats’s vision of history W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
    • A single gyre resembles a funnel,
    • which begins at a fixed point.
    • From this point the spiral grows
    • wider and wider until it reaches
    • its maximum growth. At this climax,
    • the single gyre “begins to retrace
    • its path in the opposite direction”.
    4. Gyres W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  • 5. The Great Wheel A wheel with twenty-eight spokes representing the twenty-eight phases of the lunar month. Every civilization passes through all twenty-eight phases of the wheel. One historical revolution of the wheel takes 2000 years. W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  • 5. The Great Wheel W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
    • While one civilization’s people are born, live, and die, they move towards their own annihilation .
    • From this civilization’s death, another civilization arises .
    • The point at which one era’s struggle for death coincides with the next era’s struggle for birth provokes a violent turn of the gyre .
    6. Yeats’s cyclical theory of history W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
    • “ I can not now think symbols less than the greatest of all powers , whether they are used consciously by the masters of magic, or half-unconsciously by their successors, the poet, the musician and the artist.”
    • (W.B. Yeats, Magic , 1901)
    7. Yeats’s symbolism Byzantium symbolises Unity of Being, in which religious, aesthetic and practical life are one And therefore I have sailed the [seas and come To the holy city of Byzantium. W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  • “ I can not now think symbols less than the greatest of all powers , whether they are used consciously by the masters of magic, or half-unconsciously by their successors, the poet, the musician and the artist.” (W.B. Yeats, Magic , 1901) 7. Yeats’s symbolism The swan symbolises The unchanging, flawless ideal A violent divine force OR The Wild Swans at Coole Leda and the Swan W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions