29. yeats

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29. yeats

  1. 1. William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) William Butler Yeats.
  2. 2. <ul><li>1865 : born in Dublin, Ireland, into a middle-class family belonging to the Protestant minority . </li></ul><ul><li>1890s : met Lady Gregory who supported his project regardingthe Abbey Theatre . </li></ul><ul><li>1893 : published a series of essays, The Celtic Twilight , to promote an Irish renaissance . </li></ul>W. B. Yeats 1. Life Only Connect ... New Directions
  3. 3. <ul><li>He was a member of the Irish Senate from 1922 to 1928 . </li></ul><ul><li>In December 1923 he was the first Irish author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. </li></ul><ul><li>He died in Menton, France in 1939 . </li></ul>W. B. Yeats 1. Life Only Connect ... New Directions
  4. 4. <ul><li>The early period  languid and sensual atmospheres of the Romantics and the decadent artists. Use of Irish folklore and influence of the French Symbolists and William Blake . </li></ul><ul><li>The middle period (beginning of the 20th century)  more modern and flexible style, started to conceive symbols as means to evoke universal myths . </li></ul><ul><li>The later period (years of maturity)  creation of his own vision . </li></ul>2. The 3 phases of Yeats’s art W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  5. 5. <ul><li>Life and all of its phases </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>cycles spiralling upwards or downwards towards a fixed climax </li></ul><ul><li>the cycle reverses </li></ul>3. Yeats’s vision of history W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  6. 6. <ul><li>A single gyre resembles a funnel, </li></ul><ul><li>which begins at a fixed point. </li></ul><ul><li>From this point the spiral grows </li></ul><ul><li>wider and wider until it reaches </li></ul><ul><li>its maximum growth. At this climax, </li></ul><ul><li>the single gyre “begins to retrace </li></ul><ul><li>its path in the opposite direction”. </li></ul>4. Gyres W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  7. 7. 5. The Great Wheel A wheel with twenty-eight spokes representing the twenty-eight phases of the lunar month. Every civilization passes through all twenty-eight phases of the wheel. One historical revolution of the wheel takes 2000 years. W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  8. 8. 5. The Great Wheel W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  9. 9. <ul><li>While one civilization’s people are born, live, and die, they move towards their own annihilation . </li></ul><ul><li>From this civilization’s death, another civilization arises . </li></ul><ul><li>The point at which one era’s struggle for death coincides with the next era’s struggle for birth provokes a violent turn of the gyre . </li></ul>6. Yeats’s cyclical theory of history W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  10. 10. <ul><li>“ I can not now think symbols less than the greatest of all powers , whether they are used consciously by the masters of magic, or half-unconsciously by their successors, the poet, the musician and the artist.” </li></ul><ul><li>(W.B. Yeats, Magic , 1901) </li></ul>7. Yeats’s symbolism Byzantium symbolises Unity of Being, in which religious, aesthetic and practical life are one And therefore I have sailed the [seas and come To the holy city of Byzantium. W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions
  11. 11. “ I can not now think symbols less than the greatest of all powers , whether they are used consciously by the masters of magic, or half-unconsciously by their successors, the poet, the musician and the artist.” (W.B. Yeats, Magic , 1901) 7. Yeats’s symbolism The swan symbolises The unchanging, flawless ideal A violent divine force OR The Wild Swans at Coole Leda and the Swan W. B. Yeats Only Connect ... New Directions

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