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Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
Science fair informational presentation bryant
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Science fair informational presentation bryant

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  • 1. Science Fair Projects Young Scientists Search the Unknown…
  • 2. Communication Tools
    • Parent Resources:
      • Science Fair Brochure – Updated 2011
      • Parent Resource Guide
      • Science Fair Parent Power point
  • 3. Importance of Science Projects?
    • Allows for a variety of learning styles
    • Real world application
    • Hands-on approach to learning
    • Encourages higher order thinking
    • Allows students to investigate what they are interested in
    • Students are responsible for their own learning
    • Cross-curricular
  • 4. Think of a Science Project as an extended assignment , with three distinct phases .
  • 5. #1 – The Planning Phase
    • Most detailed part… includes:
    • Journal….journal….journal
    • Deciding what to do
    • Doing some research
    • Forming a hypothesis
    • Writing the experiment plan
    • KEY: Keep It Simple!
  • 6. #2 - The Experimentation Phase
    • The fun part…includes:
    • Actually conducting the experiment
    • Collecting and recording the data
    • Seeing if the hypothesis was correct
  • 7. #3 – The Artistic Phase
    • The creative part…includes:
    • Putting the information on a poster board
    • Having an organized plan
    • Creating a presentation
  • 8. Bryant Science Fair
    • In class, each student will create a presentation on a half-sheet of poster board for our school Fair
    • Winners from each grade/category will then create a display board for the District
    • Science Fair
  • 9. Teacher Roles
    • Guide students in choosing a topic
    • Guide students through the steps of the science investigation
    • Guide students in keeping a log of their project
    • Students will work on their
    • projects in class and develop a
    • final product.
  • 10. Parent Roles
    • Assist students in gathering data at home that cannot be gathered in the classroom
      • Involves change over time
      • Involves materials unavailable in the classroom
          • Ensure that your child is meeting due dates for each component of the project – Dates may vary by teacher
  • 11. What topic is right for my student?
    • Is it realistic? Does he/she have enough time?
    • Is it interesting and measureable?
    • Is it something he/she can do?
    • Can I investigate my topic, collect data,
    • and have all of the materials I need?
  • 12. Purpose
    • Tells why the investigation is being done.
    • It is written as a statement from the topic question.
    • Example:
    • The purpose of this project is to find out…
  • 13. Hypothesis
    • Now we will research the topic and find out some of the secrets under investigation!
    • Once this has been conquered, then the Inquisitive Scientist may reveal his/her possible answers to the question being investigated.
    • Don’t forget to give your reasons why the results of the experiments will turn out the way you have stated!
  • 14. Procedure (The Plan)
    • Materials
    • - What materials will you need for your
    • experiment?
    • - Be sure to list all materials, the
    • type, and amount (in metric ).
  • 15. Variables
    • Manipulated (Independent)
    • What is being changed in the experiment on
    • purpose. (What you are testing)
    • Responding (Dependent)
    • The measurable result of what is being changed in the experiment. (What you are measuring)
    • Held Constant
    • All the things that are kept the same or
    • controlled during the experiment.
  • 16. Step by Step Directions (The Recipe)
    • Write them clearly so someone else can follow them.
    • Be specific and not too lengthy.
    • Remember to indicate how many trials are necessary : Example
    • “ Repeat steps 3-6 four more times
    • with each item being tested for a
    • total of five trials”.
  • 17. Data The Dirt-The Evidence!
  • 18.
    • The Data is kept on a chart or a table.
    • All the trials of the experiment must be indicated. (5 or more trials)
    • The data must be measured in Metric units for grades 3-5 ; (K in non-standard, 1 st -2 nd in Standard units)
    • All data must be collected according to the math skills of each grade level
  • 19. Graphs ( a picture of the results)
    • It is an organized way to display the data collected during the investigation.
    • There are two main types of graphs.
  • 20.
    • 1. Bar Graphs- (most common type of graph)
    • Displays data that does not occur
    • in a continuous manner
    • Ex. (Number of burgers eaten)
  • 21.
    • 2. Line Graphs- Displays data that occurs in a
    • continuous manner
    • Ex. (Growth of a plant over a controlled period of time)
    Plant Height (cm) Growth Period Plant Growth
  • 22. Results
    • Write paragraph or a short list of the results from your experiments.
    • You are not analyzing yet-just listing!
  • 23. Conclusion (Summary)
    • The analysis of the data as it relates to the original hypothesis. It should include:
    • - Whether or not your data supports
    • your hypothesis.
    • - A description of any problems.
    • - What would you do differently next
    • time?
  • 24. Requirements
    • All projects must have a Data Log
    • - The log should be in the form of a notebook
    • or tablet showing evidence of student work
    • throughout investigation period.
    • - All entries in the log should have dates for
    • each part of the project.
    • - Logs may be hand-written or typed.
    • Example: 11/3/10 Today I chose my topic. My topic
    • is…The purpose of my project is…
    • 11/8/10 I researched my topic and wrote my
    • hypothesis. My hypothesis is…
  • 25. Extra! Extra! ‘Research’ All About It!
    • A Research Paper may be included and placed in a separate Research Folder.
    • Extra data, photos, and information may be included in the Research Folder.
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28. … Science is Everywhere! http://www.pickinsplinters.com/2009/10/08/open-thread-thursday-october-8th-2009/#comment-7264
  • 29. District Entries Class Projects ENTRIES ALLOWED PER SCHOOL K - 2: 1 per grade Individual Projects ENTRIES ALLOWED PER SCHOOL 3 - 5: 2 per grade Small Group Projects ENTRIES ALLOWED PER SCHOOL 3 - 5: 4 per school and 1 additional project* from an exceptional education group may be included per school

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