Chism family Paternal line
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Chism family Paternal line

on

  • 876 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
876
Views on SlideShare
876
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Chism family Paternal line Chism family Paternal line Presentation Transcript

  • Chism Family Tree
  • “I am fierce with the fierce.” Clan Chisholm Motto
  • December 25, 2013 By: (The children/spouses and grandchildren of Kennith Terry Chism) Christy Halliday (Chism), Billy “Allan”, Katie & Aubrey Halliday, William “Kent” & Laura Chism, and Fay, Ava, & Levi Chism, Rose Chism, And Tyler Chism
  • Origins • This name is formed from the Norman „chese‟ which meant „to choose‟, and „holm‟ which is a Saxon word that meant „meadow‟. • The early Chisholms came across the North Sea and the lands they claimed in Roxburghshire, Scotland became a feudal barony. The original Border seat was the barony of Chisholme. • Tradition stating that the Chisholms were a Norman family who arrived in England after the Norman conquest of 1066. According to the Collins Scottish Clan & Family Encyclopedia the Chisholm name was known in the Scottish Borders since the reign of Alexander III of Scotland. In early records the name is written as "de Cheseholme", eventually later becoming Chisholm.
  • Chisholm Gaelic Name: Siosal Motto: Feros ferio (I am fierce with the fierce) Badge: Fern Lands: Roxburghshire and Invernesshire Origin of Name: Placename, Roxburghshire Pipe Music: Chisholm's March Current Chief: Hamish Chisholm of Chisholm, The Chisholm
  • Chism Family History (Paternal Lineage)
  • Alexander De Chisholm • Birth: About 1190, in England • Death: After 1248, Chisholm, Roxburghshire, Scotland Notes: The Ragman Roll of 1296, listing the supporters of England‟s Edward I mentions Richard de Chisholme and John de Chisholme. The seal used by the family shows a boar‟s head which represented the traditional story of two Chisholm brothers who saved a king from a wild boar. (The story is that three of Alexander‟s ancestors-Alexander, Donald and Hugh, were the only three Chisholm men to survive-out of the fifty who fought to defend Prince Charles, at Culleden. These three sheparded the prince away, and across the country. Hugh vowed, after shaking the Prince‟s hand at the end of their journey, he would never shake another man‟s hand. (He kept his vow for life.)
  • Alexander De Chisholm, 1190 John De Chisholm, 1210 Richard “Robert” De Chisholm, 1236 Sir John De Chisholm, 1258 Lord Alexander De Chisholm, 1290 Chief Robert “Richard” De Chisholm, 1302 Chief Robert De Chisholm, 1358 Sir Robert De Chisholm, 1422
  • Edmund De Chisholm, 1453 Sir James Chisholm, 1495 James Chisholm, 1531 Richard Josiah Chisholm, 1613 James Chisholm, 1657 John Chisholm I, 1681 John Chisholm, 1704
  • Benjamin Elisha Chism, 1750 Benjamin Chism II, 1796 JH “James” Chism, 1830 Enoch Earl Marvin, 1892 Gabriel “Gabe” Lewis Chism, 1868 Glen Franklin Chism, 1924
  • Chief Robert “Richard” De Chisholm-the Knight (Alexander‟s great-great-great-grandson) • Birth: 1302, Paxton, Scotland • Death: Chisholm, Roxburghshire, Scotland • Notes: In 1334, he married Ann Lauder, heiress of Quarrelwood. He fought against the English at the Battle of Neville‟s Cross in 1346, and was taken prisoner with King David II. He was released eleven years later. In 1359, he succeeded his grandfather as Constable of Urquhart Castle, and later became Sheriff of Iverness and Justiciar of the North. He was the last to hold lands in both the north and south of Scotland. He divided his estates amongst his youngest children.
  • Chief Robert De Chisholm, V (son of Chief Robert “Richard” De Chisholm) • Birth: 1358, Chisholm, Roxburghshire, Scotland • Death: 1376 Notes: Governor of Urquhart Castle (on the shores of the Loch Ness). Married to Margaret Halyburton, “The Lady of Erchless”. Erchless Castle was sold in 1937. The Story Goes…..
  • The Lady of Erchless Erchless Castle, though thus intimately associated with war, has also a traditional romance of love, the story of which is still current in the locality, though dates are lacking. About six miles from the Castle, on the other side of the Beauly River, stands the Castle of Beaufort, the ancient seat of the Clan Fraser. It so happened at one time that Fraser, the Lord of Lovat, had an only daughter whose welfare was his chief concern. Reared beneath the shelter of Beaufort Castle and encircled by the unremitting care of her father and brethren, she grew up to womanhood. The young Chief of the Chisholms had seen the maid and had fallen captive to her charms; but the two families were then at feud, and though the lady reciprocated his affection no marriage seemed possible. At length Chisholm decided to win his bride at the point of the sword; and one moonlight night, accompanied by a few of his faithful followers, he waylaid her near some well-known trysting-place and bore her away to his own territory. With commendable caution he refrained from carrying her to Erchless Castle, where she would be first sought for, but rather took her to a lonely isle in Loch Bruirach where he deemed her safe from discovery.
  • Meanwhile the Frasers had found out about the loss of their beloved Lady. They soon discovered the spot which the youthful lover had chosen. What will not man endure when love and beauty is his reward? But the odds against The Chisholm were fearful; and when his lady clung to his arm and implored him to resign her again to her kindred rather than risk his life, her very entreaties impeded his swordsmanship. With his left arm supporting her whom he valued as dearer than life, he strove to beat back the weapons of his enemies; and though his defence was a gallant one, of what avail was his prowess against so many? Had he remained on the mainland some fleet horse might have borne him into the wilds of Glen Elchaig or the barren shelter of Mealfourvounie; but the dark waters of the loch encircled him. Bearing up his precious charge he again essayed the combat, even though overborne by his assailants, but the moon was overcast by a flying scud which swept across the sky, and in the temporary darkness which was thus produced the fatal thrust which was aimed at his heart by one of her brethren was received by herself! Sinking breathless, lifeless to the ground, the fair cause of this deadly tumult yielded up her breath, and lay before the speechless and agonized combatants in the chill embrace of Death!
  • Castle Erchless
  • Edmund De Chisholm, born 1453 Birth: 1453, Perthshire, Scotland Death: 1500 Notes: Married Lady Jean Graham. They had two sons: Bishop W De Chisholm and James De Chisholm (our direct ancestor).
  • Bishop W De Chisholm (son of Edmund De Chisholm and brother of James) From an early date a branch of the clan was settled at Cromlix, or Cromlics, in Perthshire, which includes the episcopal city of Dunblane. At the Reformation, this branch produced in succession three bishops, all of the name of William, each of whom strenuously opposed the tenets of the Reformation. Bishop W De Chisholm, who died in 1564, was notorious for his moral shortcomings, and seized the pretext of the Reformation, when church lands were being cast into the melting pot, to alienate the episcopal estates of Dunblane to his illegitimate children. The second of these bishops, Bishop W‟s nephew-Bishop William, of Dunblane, who was appointed co-adjutor to his uncle in 1561, and succeeded him as Bishop in 1564, acted as envoy for Mary Queen of Scots from 1565 to 1567. Before 1570, like several other Catholic Scottish bishops, he withdrew to France, where he was appointed Bishop of Vaison. In 1584 he became a monk of the Chartreuse, and latterly was prior of the Chartreuse at Lyons and Rome. This bishop also was succeeded by a nephew, who became bishop of Vaison in 1584. He was notorious for his intrigues in Scottish affairs in 1602, when, in the interest of the Scottish Catholics, he endeavored to obtain the cardinalate. He was rector of Venaissin from 1603 till his death in 1629. Finally, by the marriage of Jane, only daughter of Sir James Chisholm of Cromlix, to James, second son of David, second Lord Drummond, who afterwards became Lord Maderty, the lands were carried into the family of that nobleman, and gave his descendant, Viscount Strathallan, his second title, which is still carried by his descendant, the Earl of Perth, though the superiority of the lands afterwards passed to the Earl of Kinnoul.
  • A publication during the “Bishop Wars”
  • Richard Josiah Chisholm (great-great-great-grandson of Robert De Chisholm and Lady Erchless) • Birth: 1613, London, Middlesex, England • Death: 1670, Lancaster, Virginia Colonies • Notes: Emigrated from England to Virginia, February 1642, with the new Virginian Governor-William Berkeley. He married Margaret Isham, and they had at least 6 children, including James Chisholm (our direct ancestor), born 1657, in New Kent County, Lancaster, Virginia. James married Ann Carter, and John Chism I, was born in 1681, in Lancaster Virginia.
  • A famous connection… Richard Josiah Chisholm had 7 siblings. One of which was his older sister Agnes, born 1560. Agnes married John Napier, credited with the invention of logarithms. John Napier, the “Father of Logarithms”
  • John Chism, I (Richard Josiah Chisholm‟s son) • Birth: 1681, Lancaster, Virginia Colonies (Polecat Creek, Mattapony River Valley, in Old St. John‟s Parish) • Death: April 1734, Virginia Colonies (Caroline County) • Notes: John was a lawyer. He married Elizabeth Bradley, and had three sons: John (our direct ancestor), William, and James.
  • The Famous “Chisholm Trail” Connection Birth: 1805, Eastern Tennessee Death: March 4, 1868, at Left Hand Spring, near present-day, Geary, Oklahoma Notes: Jesse Chisholm, born 1805 in East Tennessee, was the great-great-grandson of John Chisholm the first, born 1681. (lineage below) John Chisholm, 1681 William Chism (our John Chisholm, 1704‟s brother) Captain John Chisholm, 1755 Ignatius Chisholm (Jesse‟s father), 1778 Before his death, he was credited with the Chisholm Trail, the route taken during cattle drives through Indian Territory (preset day Oklahoma), from Texas to Kansas in 1826.. Ironically, he never drove cattle on the trail named for him. He was also a frontier trader who first worked amongst the plains Indians and served as a mediator in their dealings with the Cherokee Nation, the Republic of Texas, and the United States. Jesse first came to Arkansas with his mother (the Cherokee Indian sister of “Corn Tassle” Chisholm) and two brothers (John and William) in 1810. They moved to the Cherokee Nation in the late 1820‟s, and settled near Fort Gibson in what is now eastern Oklahoma.
  • Chisholm first emerged into history as a member of a gold-searching party that explored up the Arkansas River to the site of present Wichita, Kansas, in 1826. Four years later, he helped blaze a trail from Fort Gibson to Fort Touscon, and in 1834, he was a member of the Dodge-Levanworth expedition, which made the first official contact with the Comanche, Kiowa, and Wichita, near the Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma. In 1836, Chisholm married fifteen-year-old Eliza Edwards, daughter of Creek trader James Edwards, who operated a trading post situated on the right bank of the Little River about three miles above its confluence with the North Canadian River. From there, Chisholm made trading ventures onto the prairie, becoming close friends with tribe leaders. Jesse learned many languages, and was a sought-after interpreter and guide. Jess Chisholm was known to buy and/or negotiate the trade for children that had been captured by different Indian tribes. If he couldn‟t find them a home, he adopted them. Jesse met Sam Houston (President of the Republic of Texas) during his role as a guide and interpreter, and the two became relatives, when Sam married Jesse‟s aunt-Talahina “Tiana” Chism (she was the daughter of Ignatius Chism & his second wife-Martha Rogers). During the 1840‟s, Chisholm assisted the Republic of Texas and the Unite States in bringing American Indian leaders to treaty councils in which he served as an intermediary and interpreter. Following the 1846 Treaty of Comanche Peak, Chisholm accompanied an Indian delegation to Washington, D.C. where he interpreted President James K. Polk. He died while trading with American Indians on Salt Creek, from food poisoning. It is said that Jesse ate bear or buffalo meat that was rancid and had been cooked in a copper pot. His grave reads: “No one ever left his home cold or hungry.”
  • Sam Houston and Tiana Sam Houston, President of the Republic of Texas Talahania “Tiana” Chism
  • John Chism (son of John Chism, I) • Birth: 1704, St. John‟s Parish, Virginia • Death: October 9, 1792, Amelia County, Virginia • Notes: John got 400 acres in the Little Fork of the Sherando River January 21, 1733, and 400 acres on the Stanton River in December 1736. John married Eleanor (Ellender) Gillington, and they lived in her father‟s household a short time. (It is believed that Eleanor was full-blooded Cherokee). He gave the couple 200 acres on Flat Creek in 1743 that they sold to John Cook in 1754. As a young man, John studied at the same school that President George Washington later went to. John also received education from his uncle James Chism-who was personal secretary to Governor Spotswood and Sir Thomas Fox. John and Eleanor had 22 children (Sara “Sallie”, the youngest, was adopted). Many of his sons were heavily involved in the military.
  • John & Eleanor Chism Captain John Chism James David Chism Elizabeth Chism Absalom Chism Adam Chism Elisha Chism (Twin) Captain Elijah Chism (Twin) Isham Chism Chloe Chism Anna Chism Priscilla Chism Sarah “Sallie” Nee Hightower (adopted) Thomas Obadiah Chism Samuel Chism Lego Chism Jesse Chism Nicholas Chism Mary Chism Grace Chism Phoebe Chism Benjamin Elisha Chism (our direct ancestor)
  • John & Eleanor‟s oldest son‟s family tree Captain John Chism First Marriage & Children Margaret Davis James Chism, birth unknown Sarah Kilpatrick James Chism, 1758 Elijah Chism, 1760 Sarah Chism, 1765 Second Marriage & Children to his “seventh cousin” Anna Chism, 1777 Isham Russell Chism , 1775 Captain John “Red Buck” Chism, 1779 Elijah Kaufman Chism, 1779 Dempsey Chism, 1784 Amelia “Milly” Chism, 1780 Elijah M. Chism, 1785 Jesse Chism, 1785 Sarah “Sallie” Chism, 1788 Pheriba “Phoebe” Chism, 1787
  • Child of Captain John: Dempsey Chism family, son of Captain John Chism Top far right: Mary Cash ChismDempsey‟s wife Seated right: Julia Ruth Chism, wife of John Walter Wallace
  • Children of Captain John Chism: Amelia. Chism, Fereby‟s older sister Pheriba Jane Chism, daughter of Captain John Chism
  • Child of Captain John Chism: Captain John “Red Buck” Chism, Captain John Chism‟s son, with wife, Margaret Chism (Davis) Captain John “Red Buck” Chism received letters, as a young man, from Andrew Jackson while he was President, telling of his exploits at Horseshoe Bend. Captain John "Red Buck" Chisholm lived out his last days with his favorite son Ben Frank Chism, at his home, in Texas. Captain John took his family bible, containing family records, and other personal belongings to Texas with him when he moved. Captain John “Red Buck” Chism & Sarah Greenwood Chism (Kilpatrick, another one) Rufus King Chism John M. Chism Lucinda F. Chism Norton G. Chism Enoch Parsons Chism Alexander Claiborne Chism James Elijah Chism Colonel Ben Frank Chism Angelina C. Chism Izilla Kilpatrick Chism Joseph McHenry Chism Louisa Jane Kennedy Chism John “Red Buck” Chism, grave
  • Reverend Enoch Reverend Enoch Parsons Chism, son of Captain John “Red Buck” John Alexander Chism (and sons), son of Rev. Enoch Parsons Chism (bottom left) Reuben Chism (top left), John Enoch (top right), Campbell Parsons (bottom right) Emma McDougal Chism, daughter of John Alexander Rosa Lee Chism, daughter of John Alexander Captain John “red Buck” Chism lineage, through his son, John Alexander
  • Grandchild of Captain John Chism: Captain John “Red Buck‟‟ Chism‟s son, Col. Ben Frank Chism Colonel Ben Frank Chism & Didama Chism (Bowen) Jennie Nancy Davis (Chism)
  • Great-grandchild of Captain John Chism: Jennie Nancy Davis (Chism) and Lillie Davis, her daughter. Jennie was the daughter of Ben Frank Chism, son of John “Red Buck”
  • Thomas Obadiah Chism‟s sonObadiah Chism, as a young man Two of Obadiah‟s children: Mary Ann “Polly” Chism (left) and Lucinda Chism (right) John & Eleanor Chism Thomas Obadiah Chism Patty An Chism Betsey Ann Chism Mary Ann Chism Susanna Chism John W. Chism Gillington Chism James L. Chism Melinda Chism Thomas E. Chism Thomas Obadiah Chism, son of John & Eleanor Obadiah Chism Elijah Chism Gillington Chism, son of Thomas Obadiah Chism
  • Benjamin Elisha Chism (son of John & Eleanor Chism) • Birth: 1770 (records vary) • Death: 1827, Rocky Bayou, Izard County, Arkansas • Notes: It is believed that Ben was married twice-once to Springflower Elizabeth Dark, the daughter of Chief George Adam Dark, son of Chief George Adam Dark Ottowa. (Springflower‟s nephew is the notorious “Bill Dark”, of Marion County, Arkansas). Ben married Winifred Russell last. She died in Izard County, Arkansas in 1820. Ben (also called Elisha) mentions her in his 1827 will. Ben and Springflower had 4 children (one was adopted); “Winnie” and Ben had about 5 children. Benjamin chism, II was born to Springflower and Benjamin Elisha. Ben lived in the Rocky Bayou Township of Izard County, Arkansas. Ben‟s son, Benjamin Chism, II married Mary “Polly” Walker; they had 11 children, including J.H. “James” Chism. One of their children was adopted from “Dellie” Dark-the mother of the notorious “Bill Dark” of Arkansas. Dellie‟s husband was so cruel, that she gave her little daughter-”Mary” to Ben II and “Polly” to raise.
  • Some of Benjamin Elisha‟s other family… • Captain Elijah Chism (Benjamin Elisha‟s older brother) earned his title in service to General John Sevier on the Etowah Campaign against the Cherokee Indians. He was also a delegate from Hawkins County, North Carolina, and called in 1789, to ratify the United States Constitution. Chisholm‟s Ford in Hawkins County, was named for him. • Captain John Chisholm (Benjamin Elisha‟s oldest brother)was a scout in the army (a spy), under Colonel Robert Slaughter, and is listed on the Virginia payroll, as “OspyO”. • Elizabeth, (Ben‟s oldest daughter), married John Thomas Gray, and the two had 6 children, including Hartwell B. Walker-who applied on the Dawes list, and was denied.
  • Dawes Application Number Hartwell B Walker Cherokee 211, page 250 brother James on it too John Gray, husband of Elizabeth (right) Hartwell B. Walker, son-in-law of John & Elizabeth Gray (both right). He married their daughter Elizabeth Ann Gray. Hartwell is also the nephew of Elizabeth Chism Gray, as his mother is Eleanor (Chism) Walker (Elizabeth Chism‟s sister) Elizabeth Gray (chism)-Benjamin Elisha Chism‟s oldest daughter
  • 1850 Census, showing the household of Benjamin Chism Benjamin Chism, age 50 Polly, age 47 William, age 23 Benjamin, age 22 Wenney, age, 19 James, age 17 Elizabeth, age 14 Thomas, age 10 Isham, age 8 Henderson, age 6 Washington, age 3
  • Early Izard County was divided into townships. Rocky Bayou Township, Izard County, Arkansas Rocky Bayou township was created before 1836. The name was changed to Lunenburg between 1870-76. Today, Rocky Bayou is a stream, located near Sandy Fiat Road, Izard County, Arkansas.
  • Trail of Tears and Dawes List Dawes List Chisholm’s (followed by Census card number): Eliza 16298 Buster 16300 Nancy 30870 Webster 30871 Lizzie 30872 Ollie 30873 Davis 30474 Lillie 30875 Sallie 30876 John 30877 Lucy 30878 Rosa 30879 Alice 32197 James 32198 Harry 32199 Daniel 32200
  • Trail of Tears Trail of Tears went through Baxter and Marion Counties. There is a marble plaque on the Baxter county court house. Denton Ferry Road (was Denton's Ferry at White River back along time ago)Also known as Talbert's Ferry. It continues north of Flippin and into Yellville, on the west, where Highway 202 is now. Shawnee town (Yellville now) was a trouble town. Indians sold whiskey. Because of this, they bypassed the actual town on the Old Military Road. Trail of Tears ended March 26, 1839, and more than four thousand graves behind them. It started May 1838, with an escort of 4000 regulars and 3000 volunteers under General Winfield Scott. They crossed Marion County in the winter. Some were poorly dressed and ill-clad. They forded the white river and made camp.
  • Benjamin Chism II (son of Benjamin Elisha Chism) • Birth: 1796 • Death: 1860 • Notes: Ben Chism, II, married Mary “Polly” Walker and they had 11 children. Ben died 1860, in South Carolina, and Polly, 1860, in Arkansas.
  • J.H. James Chism (son of Benjamin Chism) • Birth: 1830 • Death: May 18, 1865, Fort Smith, Arkansas (Buried at: Andersonville National Cemetery, Georgia), grave 1186 Notes: James was a scout (spy) in the Arkansas 10th Regiment, Company D, Infantry, for the Confederate army. (He was also in the 7th Regiment, until both Regiments merged). The 10th Regiment was organized July 1861, in Springfield, Arkansas. James‟ muster roll indicates he signed on in 1862. The 10th Regiment was part of the garrison that surrendered at Port Hudson, Louisiana on July 9, 1863, leaving James a Prisoner of War (POW) for a time. JH married Sarah Jane Blankenship in 1850, and the couple had 4 children: Benjamin Chism, III, Emily Jane (married Wilkins), Gabriel “Gabe” Lewis Chism, and Sally “Sarah” Chism.
  • James JH Chism Military Records: A copy of James‟ receipt roll for clothing in the army. Sallie Sarah Nee Hightower, adopted daughter of JH and Sarah Jane Chism
  • A Dark Story from Sarah Jane Blankenship‟s (JH James‟ wife) Family….. Elijah Blankenship (Sarah Jane‟s brother) was about 7 years younger than his wife, Sarah Jane Goodrich Blankenship, and they had five children together, Poline, Mary, Elijah, Jerusha, Altha. They lived on Pine Ridge just off state hwy 56. Elijah was cruel to his family and a heavy drinker. He was known to spend their money on liquor instead of providing for his family. It has also been said that Elijah would hide the money under rocks to keep it away from Sarah Jane. Elijah would come home drunk and beat Sarah Jane and threaten to kill her. Instead of whipping his children, Elijah would make them place their hands on a hot wood stove for punishment. Sarah left Elijah sometime around August 1877. Elijah had this notice printed in The Melbourne Clipper on August 7, 1877 “Notice Is hereby given that my wife Sarah J. Blankenship has left me without just cause and that I will not be responsible for any debt, contract, or promise she may make from this date henceforth. This September 13th, 1877. Signed Elijah Blankenship” But, by 1880 Sarah Jane was back living with Elijah. Sometime in 1880, Elijah came home very drunk and said when he got up one of them is going to die. Sarah was unable to take the abuse anymore. So sometime during the night Sarah sewed a sheet around Elijah so he could not move when he woke up. Sarah then took an ax and struck Elijah in the neck cutting his Jugular vain and took the children and hid.
  • Elisha Blankenship story continued….. Some how Elijah managed to get out of the sheet and get on his horse, or mule. Elijah was able to get to the end of their lane before falling from his horse and bleeding to death. Some believe Elijah made to the Doctor in Brockwell and got treated. After he healed he moved north and started a new family. It has been said it was Sarah Jane‟s half brother, Tom Rushing, who killed Elijah. Sarah admitted to the murder because the courts would be more lenient on a woman. During the preliminary hearing the judge, who is believed to have been Judge Cap Hanley Sr, said “You should have chopped the old devil‟s head off a long time ago”. The judge dismissed the case. We may never know which one killed Elijah or what was said at the hearing because all the records of the hearing were lost when the court house burned down on the morning of April, 11th 1889.
  • Elizabeth Blankenship, Sarah Jane‟s Blankenship Chism‟s mother
  • John Green Chism and second wife Sarah E. Huff with children. John Green is JH James‟s nephew. John Green was the son of William Chism, JH‟s oldest brother. Thomas Marion Chism and wife Alabama Reeves Chism. Thomas is the brother of John Green.
  • Gabriel Lewis Chism (son of JH James Chism) • Birth: March 30, 1865, Old Joe, Arkansas • Death: March 11, 1922, near Newburg, Arkansas (Sudden Stroke) Notes: “Gabe” only had one ear, due to the fact that a mule bit the other one off! Gabe married Elizabeth “Betty” Blankenship in 1889. Betty was from Izard County, Arkansas. The couple had 8 children. Betty died in 1899 during the birth of her son-Owen Chism.
  • How “Old Joe, Arkansas” got its name Sometime before 1873, a slave named "Little Joe" (belonged to Robert Lackey) went up the mountain to feed cows and was caught in a terrible storm and killed. To honor his memory, people in the area nicknamed the mountain and area after him. Later, post office officials wanted to name the post office there Little Joe, and after some negotiations, settled on the name "Old Joe". Joe is buried in the Galatia Cemetery near Old Joe, now in Baxter County, Arkansas.
  • Gabriel Chism family-a census This Census shows Gabe and his uncle-Ben Chism, working as laborers away from home.
  • Gabriel‟s youngest son-Owen‟s family
  • Gabriel‟s big brother… • Benjamin James Chism, III was a private in Company D, Arkansas Infantry, 10th Regiment, and was a scout. It was said that he lied about his age to get in. He was also a coal miner, and had a silver mine hidden in Marshall, Arkansas, behind a water-fall (according to his daughter, Mary “Swecia” chism). Military records show him as “James B. Chism”.
  • Benjamin James Chism, III death certificate Benjamin was 77 years old at his time of death on October 21, 1929, in Clarksville, Johnson County, Arkansas. He died of Cancer of the face and head. Notes: Ben‟s grandson-Noah Jefferson Chism was a hay truck driver and helped to move hay into the aircrafts for “Operation Hay Lift” to the cattle that were freezing back East in the 1940‟s. He can be seen loading the hay in a short “news reel” that was shown in movie theaters during that time.
  • Enoch Earl Marvin Chism (son of Gabriel Chism) Birth: August 14, 1892, Old Joe, Arkansas Death: March 4, 1966 (Buried in the Optimus, Stone County, Cemetery) Notes: Marvin had a crippled leg when he was about 43 years old while playing baseball and sliding into a rock base. He walked with a cane from there on out. At one time, he bought cattle and drove them to the stockyards at Calico Rock, Arkansas. The railroad then shipped the cattle to St. Louis, Missouri, to the large stockyards. Marvin married Mae Idell Collins December 3, 1920, and they had 12 children
  • Enoch Earl Marvin, gravesite
  • Enoch Earl Marvin descendants Enoch Earl Marvin Chism & Mae Idell Collins Willie Amel Chism, 1922-1987 Glen Franklin Chism, 1924-2008 Leonard Neal Chism, 1926-1990 Opal Jewel Lucille Chism Freemen (Chism), 1927-1999 Cassie Marie Smith (Chism), 1929 Earl Edward Chism, 1932-1998 Erma June Sexton (Chism), 1934-2004 Dale Francis Chism, 1936-2013 Velma Jean Honeycliff, 1939 Donald Ray Chism, 1941-2003 Noel Dean Chism, 1944-2009 Curtis Lee Chism, 1947
  • Earl Marvin‟s Birth Certificate
  • Earl Marvin‟s Marriage License & Census
  • Some photos of Marvin‟s family… Walter Chism-Marvin‟s brother Troy Freemen, Marvin‟s son-in-law (married Opal) Marvin‟s nephew (Owen‟s son), William Chism Homer, Marvin‟s brother
  • Mae, Curtis in the background “Sena” Collins, Marvin‟s mother-in-law Opal, Erma June, Mae, Marie, Earl Edward, and little Dale in front
  • (Marvin‟s children) Noel, Erma June, Velma, Marie, Opal, Curtis, and Glen
  • Marie, in 1947, daughter of Marvin Noel Chism, son of Marvin Leonard, son of Marvin
  • Erma June as a child Jack and Opal Glen, Jarlene, Paul, Melvin, Cecil, Helen, Connie, Kenny
  • Don, Noel, and Curtis Don Chism
  • Amel Chism Dale, Kay and Baby Roger Dale Francis Chism
  • Velma, daughter of Marvin Marie holding Patty, Mae, with Curtis standing out front
  • Marvin‟s kids (missing Jack)
  • Glen Franklin Chism • Birth: 1924 • Death: 2008 An avid woodsman and deer hunter. A good father who loved his family greatly. As a young man, he worked on the family farm and at age 14, he began working at a sawmill. Glen and Jarlene picked cotton in the southern part of Arkansas and sometimes traveled to Washington for the fruit harvest. At one time, Glen's family traveled to Michigan and picked berries. Later he worked on Don Ruff's turkey farm at Mountain Home. He was always outside doing something: cutting wood, building fence, or working on a piece of farm equipment. He enjoyed riding his four wheeler and farming. Jarlene and Glen liked living at Culp, and raising cattle. Everyone was always welcome at their home.
  • Glen Chism, photos Glen and Jarlene Paul, Cecil, Melvin, and Helen Chism
  • Glen Chism, photos
  • Glen Chism Family, photos
  • Glen and his son, Kennith Chism Vernon Lee Chism, son of Glen and Jarlene, buried at Optimus Cemetery Melvin Chism (Glen‟s son) and his son Jared Chism
  • Helen (Chism) and Joe Woods, with their sons: Scot and Chris. Helen is Glen‟s daughter. Glen, Jarlene, and grandson Randy (Connie Corter (Chism) is his mother.
  • Glen‟s daughters: Lisa, Connie, Helen (Randy in front) Paul Chism, Glen‟s oldest son, and his oldest two children Tony and Tracy Chism
  • Glen‟s wife, Jarlene Lisa Ann Stubbs (Chism, Glen‟s youngest child Kennith Chism, Glen‟s son Lisa, Connie, Helen Melvin Chism family
  • Cecil and Donna Chism Glen‟s son, Cecil Chism, and sons Keith and Stan
  • In loving memory of the loving father, husband, and family man
  • For more information… http://www.familylink.com/SingleIndexListview.aspx?ix=mh_tree&qt=l&rbot=1&zln=Chisholme http://www.ancestory.com Trail of Tears Registry http://cherokeeregistry.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=349&Itemid=444 Stories from the Trail of Tears http://www.ualr.edu/sequoyah/uploads/2011/11/Family%20Stories%20from%20the%20Trail%20of %20Tears.htm