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Old news about school libraries
 

Old news about school libraries

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    Old news about school libraries Old news about school libraries Presentation Transcript

    • Old News about School LibrariansBy: Chalanna Tate
    • Introduction In the Chapter “School Librarians in the Bad Old Days”, Scheeren (2010) discussed the changes of the librarians working in libraries across the United States. During the 1960’s, the library resources that were used consisted of film, filmstrips, projectors, records and record players. To continue, card catalogs were used to locate books and/or novels. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Introduction Cont’d However in the 21st century, the technological resources that are used today are blogs, twitter, face book, you tube, and google. Students are readily rely on using the internet to locate and research information for completing their class assignments. Furthermore, librarians are experiencing different stages (bleeding edge, leading edge, wedge, and trailing edge) in implementing technological applications in the library setting. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Bleeding Edge Level At this particular level, librarians are willing to use any technology type of application as soon as the new technology comes available to the public. In other words, librarians at the bleeding level, are more susceptible for change and moving forward to keep with new advancements in technology. These librarians when performing at the bleeding edge level are more apt to become leaders in technology, and they exhibit motivation and leadership qualities. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Leading Edge Level Librarians who perform at this level display characteristics that are more traditional in their acceptance of use of technology. For example, librarians at the leading edge level “are eager to move forward with technological innovation, but are willing to hang back enough to see how successful these innovations” (p. 4). In other words, these librarians do not use the latest version of computer software. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. (p. 1-238). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Wedge Level Librarians who are not risk takers are consider to be at this level are called wedge. Not only this, librarians at the wedge level do not provide updated information of resources for the public (parents, students, or other individuals) to review. Because of this quality they portray, these librarians are not consider to be good leaders in guiding the public with technological resources and tools. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Trailing Edge Level At this level, the librarians want to keep the old ways of performing technological tasks and duties. In addition, their attitude about technology is of the past. For example, “these are the librarians who still have their shelf list cards because they think the system may crash, causing all their data to be lost” (p. 5). (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. (p. 1- 238). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Library Circulations To continue about librarians of the old compared to the new, the library circulations included numerous desk circulation duties. These particular duties included checking out and returning books; overseeing damaged books and materials; providing verbal research assistance; and lastly, sending out receipts for damaged and overdue books. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Old and New Library Circulations Continued Whereas today, the library circulations are executed much smoother than the past. For example, librarians now scan books for checking in and checking out books. Also, this makes it easier for them to keep better records of when books are due, and can print out overdue, lost or damaged book receipts. In addition, students can access the internet by going to the computer and find as much research on any topic they choose assist with their assignments. In other words, the circulation of today is better than the circulation of the old days in the library.
    • Resources Used in the 1980’s The 1980’s resources of this timeframe were magazines, books and newspapers. These particular resources were use to provide information about a topic. The newspapers, magazines and books were categorized by month and issued date. Individuals were able to research and locate these information easily but it was time consuming. Furthermore, microfiche were to locate magazines articles and microfilm to view articles. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory an d Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Security Systems and Cataloging during the 1970’s During the 1970’s security systems were readily use to cut down on the cost of lost books. About 80% to 90% of books were saved from lost. In addition, librarians use cataloging which was a tedious process. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Security and Cataloging Cont’d Cataloging consist of the Dewey Classification System and Library of Congress that were used for finding books on shelves. Soon afterwards, the personal computer came about in the 1940’s that is readily used today. To continue, the personal computer became more prevalent than the desk top computer. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC)
    • Inventors Who Contributed Advanced Technology for Libraries In 1947, three inventors who helped to shaped the computer were William Shockley, John Bardeen and Walter Brittanin. These inventors contributed in the following way: Developed the transistor Bell Labs and silicon chip. Improved the personal computer speed. In addition, floppy disks were use to save information. Individuals could save research information on the floppy disks. (Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara,
    • Conclusion In conclusion, librarians roles of the old days are totally different than librarians of the new days. Librarians are even more knowledgeable about technology through training and school. They are better prepared to assist students and teachers with valuable resources. Librarians, today must know how to use the Internet and Technological Tools and programs.
    • Conclusion Cont’d In addition, librarians can show students how to use the Internet for research and present their work through blogs, wikis and PowerPoint presentations, etc. All in all, the librarians of today are better equipped to handling the 21st century.
    • Resources Scheeren, W. (2010). Technology for School Librarians, Theory and Practice. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, LLC. Personal Contact: ctate7618@gmail.com