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  • \n
  • Image: Sustainable greenhouse farms in urban centers pilot strategies for use in space. Eventually to grow food and supplies on Mars.\n
  • Image: Kelly getting started on the farm\n
  • Image: Eagle St. Farm, Brooklyn\n\nThese numbers scale accordingly both up and down based on size of Greenhouse (can go as small as 1,000, to higher than 40,000 sqft)\n
  • None of this gear is proprietary, rather the execution combines scalability and sustainability\n1. The Greenhouse\n2. Lightweight hydroponic growing\n3. Rainwater harvesting\n4. Composting nutrients\n5. Natural heating and cooling\n6. Renewable energy\n
  • Pilot: our farm is up and running. Soon opening retail space with a greenhouse on the roof.\nPipeline: Local grocery chains in discussions. A tangible proof of concept would be nice.\nBeyond: Further investment, scaling, and R&D.\n
  • Continuous harvest to maximize profitability.\n\nSmall: <$100k - strip mall grocery\nMedium: $200k - urban grocery store\nLarge: $500k - local grocery chain\n
  • In 10 years space travel will be much more accessible, and Mars will not be impossible. For any long-term human action off this planet, we need sustainable sources of food and supplies. \n
  • thank you!\n
  • \n
  • The basic ingredients (Image via Fast Company)\n
  • Versatile sizing\nControlled environment\nNatural, efficient light\n
  • Very efficient systems, utilize less then 10% the water and space of traditional methods.\nHydroponics- nutrient solution runs through tubing to roots\nAeroponics- roots grow in nutrient vapor\nAquaculture- nutrient rich water cycles between crops and fish tanks, constantly fertilized\nDrip irrigation- traditional soil-based medium, with highly-controlled nutrient/water supply\n
  • Uses so little water that it can rely on rain harvesting from greenhouse and roof of building. Reduce/eliminate storm runoff\n
  • Recycle waste from building and surrounding community into nutrients for crops. Rabbits and Earthworms super charge the system without using excess energy\n
  • Evaporative cooling, and energy efficient design keep climate regulated\n
  • We’re already up on the roof, lets put some PV arrays and wind turbines up there for when we do need power.\n
  • Non issue, Seattle loves urban agriculture.\n
  • Work with engineers and contractors to avoid structural problems, build near load bearing sections of the building (in this case, conveniently right above the produce section)\n
  • Seattle has a huge local gardening/farming population.\nP-Patches, organic local farms, immigrant population\n
  • Automation and Analytics keep yields maxed out.\n\n(Screenshot via Growtronix)\n
  • The three key people in our life\nPartners: Give us a rooftop, customer base, and reputation. Gets revenue share, green/local credibility.\nFarmers: Give us skilled labor, and detailed knowledge. Gets steady income, direct relationship with consumers, community.\nShoppers: Give us their money, attention, and referrals. Gets healthy, delicious food in their community.\n
  • \n

Transcript

  • 1. URBAN.AGsimple, sustainable rooftop agriculture @urbandotag
  • 2. URBAN.AGRooftop farming in the heart of urbancenters.Sustainable, efficient design keeps costsincredibly low, and yields incredibly high.
  • 3. SNAPSHOTFoundersChad Etsell - Business DevelopmentKelly Monaghan - Sustainable AgricultureBased in Seattle, founded in 2010Farm outside Olympia, WAAdvisorsTerry Vincent - Founder, WaterworksHydroponicsTom Frye - Partner, Baylis ArchitectsDave Goebel - CEO, Methuselah FoundationPartnersCedar Grove CompostWaterworks Hydroponics
  • 4. 10,000 SQFT URBAN FARM$ 400,000 Initial cost 85 tons CO2 mitigated 100,000 lbs Annual yield 93% Space reduction$ 400,000 Annual revenue 89% Water conservation 5-10 Local jobs created 110 lbs Pesticides mitigated
  • 5. URBAN.AG SYSTEM
  • 6. MARKET Pilot Pipeline BeyondOlympia Farm Strip Mall
  • 7. MILESTONESPilot: Olympia farm and greenhouse, online storeMVP: First working rooftop partnerScale: Profitable online store, new rooftop customersRegardless of scale (small, medium, or large):Construction in weeksFast harvest that never ends
  • 8. CONCLUSION long-term human sustainability
  • 9. APPENDICES
  • 10. CONCEPT COMPOST Utilizing waste from the farm and the building below, and feeding it to worms to produce high quality, natural and organic nutrients with little to no energy.
  • 11. THE GREENHOUSE
  • 12. HYDROPONICS
  • 13. RAIN HARVESTING
  • 14. COMPOSTING
  • 15. AIR CIRCULATION
  • 16. RENEWABLE ENERGY
  • 17. ZONING
  • 18. ENGINEERING
  • 19. STAFFING
  • 20. OPERATION
  • 21. DISTRIBUTIONFarmersPartnersShoppers
  • 22. http://urban.ag/ chad@urban.ag@urbandotag angel.co/urban-ag