Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
The Bioeconomy and Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Bioeconomy and Education

91
views

Published on

The Engineering Technology Pathways project is a collaboration between Purdue University College of Technology and Ivy Tech Community College to increase the advanced technical education mission and …

The Engineering Technology Pathways project is a collaboration between Purdue University College of Technology and Ivy Tech Community College to increase the advanced technical education mission and supported by the National Science Foundation. A brief summary is located here: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1104245

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
91
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Indiana is leader in food production and processingCritical need for specialized education in food and foodstuff industries
  • Transcript

    • 1. Food and Food Stuff – Indiana’sBioeconomy NeedsET Summit 3/20/13Chad Laux
    • 2. Grand Challenge9.1 Billionpeople by 2050will requireDoubling offood productionOnly 10% morefarmland so…70% more foodfromimprovedefficiency
    • 3. ConceptGlobal Food Security (PCGFS)• Achieving food securitythrough combination ofinterconnectedscientific, economic, social,political, and environmentalfactors.• Helping to ensure that wehave enough food, feed andfuel for the 21st centuryand beyond.3 Pillars (WHO)• Food availability: sufficientquantities of food availableon a consistent basis.• Food access: havingsufficient resources toobtain appropriate foods fora nutritious diet.• Food use: appropriate usebased on knowledge ofbasic nutrition and care, aswell as adequate water andsanitation.
    • 4. Traditional PerspectiveGlobalizationFragmentedOperationsPolicyStandardsRegs.Security andSafetyTechnologyadoptionBiofuels
    • 5. Economic Impact – North CentralRegion• 800,000 +farms• 88,000+ companies:o Manufacturing and supply of agricultural inputso Agriculture and forestry processingo Value-added manufacturing of food, nutrition and health products.o Production of industrial products• 2.4 million employees• $2,600 wage premium overaverage private sector wage• $16 billion of Gross StateProduct• 19% of Hoosier workforce• $3.4 billion in exports
    • 6. Indiana – Economic Impacts
    • 7. The Food & Ag Landscape
    • 8. Global Perspective – Value Chain
    • 9. Sector becoming more developed…
    • 10. …quality systems demand growing….
    • 11. …with increased Value sought…Value Chains• Business relationshipscollaborative• Producers havedifferentiated value• Benefits/profits viastrategic partners• Operations may becoordinated local-national-global scaleSupply chains• Business relationshipscompetitive• Producers treatedinterchangeably• Benefits/profits unevendistributed• Operations dominatedshort term globallyVs.University of Wisconsin. (2009). Value Chain Briefing Paper.
    • 12. Target occupations: Middle skill largestarea of growth (all areas)….
    • 13. National RequirementsFDA personnel competencies• Knowledge of total system flow path – operationsmgmt for food handling/operations (grains & animal)• Food traceability - Knowledge of industrial preventivecontrols• Risk Assessment -Differentiation betweeneconomic/business risks and public health/regulatedrisks• Food safety management• Quality management Systems• Accreditation/evaluation of systems• Distance Ed delivery – timeless modules basisIowa State University, North Carolina State University, Kansas State University. (2012).FDA training for Food Modernization Act.
    • 14. MEETING THE NEEDS
    • 15. Engineering Technology Pathways: theFood and Foodstuff Supply Chain• Objective 1 - Create the infrastructureneeded for technical program students totransfer from a relevant Ivy Tech A.S.program to Purdue’s B.S.E.T. program.• Objective 2 - Establish a virtual learningcommunity that promotes persistence byhelping to attract and retainstudents, engage industry into theprogram, and increase studentaccessibility.• Objective 3 - Create robust pipelineamong industry, faculty, staff andstudents.• Objective 4 - Promote sustainabilitythrough ongoing evaluation anddissemination.
    • 16. ….AOS - Core Competencies…NSF Roundtable discussions with 40+ industry partners led to the identification of most pressing needs.Professional Skills Technical Skills Advanced Technical Skills Passion for career Common sense Positive attitude Business writing skills Communications skills Foreign language (esp. Spanish)is a must in production floor Respect for bi-lingual or multi-lingual colleagues People, leadership andsupervision skills Advancement mentality Maturity Willingness to relocate,commute to rural area Willingness to get dirty, acceptnon-office jobs Problem solving Managerial skills Skills of working with automation Fundamental computer skills(excel spreadsheet) Knowledge of industry standards Knowledge of basic calculus andstatistics Ability to handle biologicallyactive items Workplace safety knowledge Bulk processing knowledge Market differentiation Project management Ability to work with advancedtechnology Knowledge of biologics Lean manufacturing Bioprocessing Microbiology CFR 21 standards Regulations/operating systemsand standards GFSI ISO standards Knowledge of OSHA, EPA, IDEM Project analysis skills Risk mitigation skills HACCP Hygienic design knowledge
    • 17. Level of AcademicChallengeActive/CollaborativeLearningStudent – FacultyInteractionSupportive CampusEnvironmentEnriching EducationExperiencesStudent Success - Engagement Model
    • 18. Quality, quantity, and diversity ofstudents• Strong core programs + Concentrated studies• More diverse student population a better studentpopulation• More interdisciplinary and degree options attracta more diverse study population (Freitag et. al.2010; EWEP, 2005)• Females want a career that is relevant andrewarding (EWEP, 2005)• Project and career orientation in embedded incoursework (Freitag et. al. 2010).
    • 19. Objectives – Coursework ProposalsTechnical Electives• Introduction to Food Technology (3 cr.)At the end of the course, you as a student will be able to:• Describe the major chemical and physical properties of foodsystems that are important to food quality.• Utilize the proper terminology/vocabulary as it relates to foodchemistry, food microbiology and food processing• Explain the role of chemical reactions, enzymes and microorganisms infood spoilage, food preservation and foodborne disease.• Discuss the need for food preservation and describe the methods usedby the food industry to preserve food products.• Discuss the impact of different processing methods on the sensory andnutritional quality of foods and on overall food safety.• Explain the many reasons why foods are processed.• Describe the seven principles of HACCP and how they work together toensure food safety in food manufacturing operations.
    • 20. Structure - Food Security SystemsTechnical Electives• Food Quality Management Systems (3 cr.)At the end of the course, you as a student will be able to:– Describe the principles and structure of qualitymanagement systems.– Explain organizational adoption and operations of qualitymanagement systems.– Explain the role of regulations, standards, and policy in thefood/stuff supply chain locally, nationally, and globally.– Understand and support organizational adoption andimplementation of food quality management systemsmeet international standards (ISO 22000 series).– Evaluate through audit how organizations meetinternational standards compliance.
    • 21. Structure - Food Security SystemsTechnical Electives – Future area?• Security Management Systems (3 cr.)At the end of the course, you as a student will beable to:– Understand security management and defense strategies– Risk analysis and mitigation– Establish, implement, maintain and improve a security managementsystem– Understand conformance with stated security management policies– Apply supply chain security principles to the food and food/stuffsupply chain
    • 22. Needs• Faculty support of AOS• IF growth of AOS to something larger – added facultyexpertise in Systems/logistics/Biotech knowledge(currently, FS providing collaboration)• Student Scholarships• Student supported Learning Community• Resources –student/faculty/industry engagement:– ISO/TAG 34 meetings (locally & international– Food Defense sector meetings – FBI/FoodSHIELD– Annual Summit of AOS Stakeholders – previous 2 funded byNSF– Student/industry projects per AOS curriculum objectives
    • 23. Engineering Technology Pathways: theFood and Foodstuff Supply Chain• Objective 1 - Create the infrastructureneeded for technical program students totransfer from a relevant Ivy Tech A.S.program to Purdue’s B.S.E.T. program.• Objective 2 - Establish a virtual learningcommunity that promotes persistence byhelping to attract and retainstudents, engage industry into theprogram, and increase studentaccessibility.• Objective 3 - Create robust pipelineamong industry, faculty, staff andstudents.• Objective 4 - Promote sustainabilitythrough ongoing evaluation anddissemination.
    • 24. Thank YouQuestions?

    ×