GRiSP - Presentation for Discussion with Donors and Partners - June 2013

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  • Gender-responsive objectives will be addressed in all Themes

Transcript

  • 1. Bas Bouman, DirectorGRiSPCRP 3.3: Global Rice SciencePartnership (GRiSP) IIOutlineResearchProgramon Rice
  • 2. 1. Justification and structure GRiSP2. Towards GRiSP II: IDOs, ImpactPathway, Theory of Change, gender,capacity building3. Performance indicators4. Geographic focus5. Partners6. Draft budgetOverview
  • 3. • 120 million rice farmers feed 3.5 billion people• 1 billion people extremely poor and 650 millionhungry depend on rice – more coming…No slowdown inglobal riceconsumptionRice fastestgrowing foodcommodity inSSA„000 milled tonnesWhy rice why GRiSP?
  • 4. => Increase rice production that is affordable to poorand profitable to farmersBut… future: less and more expensive resources,more hostile environment (climate change), need to besustainable and safeguard environmentGlobal challenge and global threatsconcerted global actionGRiSP
  • 5. GRiSP: a global response• A global partnership led by IRRI• Coordinating and founding partners:AfricaRice, CIAT, CIRAD, IRD, and JIRCAS(international mandate)• Shared vision, goals, objectives, R&D• For a value of 90-95 M $/year• Current phase: 2011-2015
  • 6. Targets 2020 (GRiSP I)1. Expenditures on rice by those under the $1.25(PPP) poverty line will decline by nearly PPP $5billion annually.2. Counting those reductions as income gains: 72million people would be lifted above the $1.25poverty line, reducing global poor by 5%.3. 40 million undernourished people would reachcaloric sufficiency in Asia, reducing hunger by 7%.4. Approximately 275 million tons of CO2 equivalentemissions averted.
  • 7. GRiSP: a global partnershipARI/Univ.(135)NARES(302)Natl. Univ.,(97)CSO(115)Gov. Org.(92)Intl./Reg. Organ.(35)CGIAR (13)Private Sector(intl., 41)Private Sector(local, 72)ResearchPartners(435, 48%)Development& Other Partners(467, 52%)15%33%11%13%10%4%5%8%Coordinatinginstitutes haveover 900research anddevelopmentpartners
  • 8. GRiSP Mission and CGIAR System-Level Outcomes (SLOs)GRiSP GCIAR-SLO1. Reduce poverty andhunger1. Reduced rural poverty2. Increased food security2. Improve human health andnutrition3. Increased health andnutrition3. Reduce the environmentalfootprint and enhance theecosystem resilience ofrice production systems4. Sustainable naturalresources management
  • 9. Research evidence baseSustainablymanagednaturalresourcesImprovedfoodsecurityReducedruralpovertyImprovednutrition andhealthIncreased agricultural growthIncreased incomeIncreased yieldIncreased productionLower rice priceIncreased labor demand and wagesIncreased productivity/resource use efficiencyIncreased value of productionDecreased cost of productionDecreased post-harvest lossIncreased nutritious value of riceProducer effectNet consumer effectAdditional linkage effectsGeneticimprovementImprovednaturalresourcesmanagementConservation of natural landscapesReduced externalities (GHG emission, water pollution,..)Yield potentialStress toleranceBiofortificationGrain qualityImprovedpost harvest
  • 10. Research themesGenes Varieties ManagementValue adding Assessment Last-mile delivery
  • 11. Outputs: products and servicesQTL: Pup1
  • 12. GRiSP New Frontier researchProject PLs InstitutionsGenotyping and phenotyping of African rice speciesand their pathogens for strategic disease resistancebreeding (MENERGEP)1.2.1.3.2.2.AfricaRice, IRD, JIRCAS,CiradIncreasing the yield potential in rice using genomicand physiological approaches2.4. IRRI, AfricaRice, CIAT,Nagoya U.Phenomics of key adaptation and yield potentialtraits - GRiSP Global Rice Phenotyping Network(PRAY)1.2. IRRI, AfricaRice, CIAT,Cirad, Embrapa, NIAES,U. Qsld., CAAS, PhilRiceEnhancing the sustainable use of phosphorusthrough the development of varieties with reducedgrain P2.3. JIRCAS, IRRI,AfricaRice, SouthernCross U., FOFIFA, YaraDevelopment of a cutting edge rice transformationplatform for complex traits (TALENs)1.3.1.4.2.2.IRRI, CIAT, U. Minnesota
  • 13. Global Rice Science ScholarshipRegion Female Male TotalAfrica 3 6 9Asia 9 8 17Europe 1 1South America 1 3 4Grand Total 14 17 31188 applicants from 40 countries31 awarded for Themes 1-5
  • 14. Towards GRiSP II1. Results-Based Management, based ona) Outputs: science-based products andservicesb) Outcomes: Intermediate DevelopmentOutcomesc) Indicators of progress and targets2. Committed CGIAR funding for delivery3. Broad Partnerships for “impact at scale”4. Gender equity and women empowerment5. Capacity building
  • 15. Intermediate DevelopmentOutcomes# IDO SLOs1 Increased rice yield 1,2,32 Increased rice productivity (resource-use efficiency) 1,2,33 Decreased poverty of net rice consumers (urban andrural) and rice producers14 Increased sustainability and environmental quality ofrice-based cropping systems45 Improved efficiency and increased value in rice valuechain1,2,36 Improved nutrition status derived from rice consumption 37 Increased rice genetic diversity for current and futuregenerations1,2,38 Increased pro-poor delivery systems 1-49 Increased gender equity in the rice value chain 1,2,3
  • 16. Schematic Impact PathwayProductPilot site farmeradopters, andbenefits seenLarge scaledisseminationLarge numbersof farmers adoptIncreasedproductivitySLO (food security, poverty,sustainability, H&N)Collaborative partneradopters, andbenefits seenGRiSP“Outside”Research outcome –Intermediate andend userIntermediatedevelopmentOutcome (IDO)5->10 years3-6 years6-9 years9-12 years>> 12 years100s1000s100,000s1,000,000sFarmersUpscalingPilot scale
  • 17. Schematic IP and Theory of ChangeProductPilot site farmeradopters, andbenefits seenLarge scaledisseminationLarge numbersof farmers adoptIncreasedproductivitySLO (food security poverty,sustainability, H&N)Assumption: product responds tofarmers’ needsRisk: product not adoptedAssumptions: partners disseminateproduct; benefits accrue toadoptersRisk: products not adoptedAssumption: product responds toa need on large scale; benefitsaccrue to adoptersRisk: practices are not adoptedAssumption:product actuallydelivers its benefitsConduct of Needs andOpportunities Assessments;target domain identification,involvement of farmers indevelopment of product(participatory approaches);develop technologies with localR&D partners, scientific evidencethat porduct ‘works’Involvement of partners inproduct development;capacity building of partners;development of businessmodels; demonstratedbenefits to adoptersAwareness campaigns,demonstration fields,marketing by private sector,penetrate remote areas(identification of target domain– see below)See early action atdevelopment of improvedpracticeAssumptions and risks Enabling actionsCollaborative partneradopters, andbenefits seenGRiSP“Outside”
  • 18. Coherence for deliveryProducts and servicesResearch outcome:uptake and disseminationby GRiSP partnersResearch outcome: uptakeand dissemination by endusers (farmers, value-chainactors)Intermediate DevelopmentoutcomesCGIAR SLOsT1 T4T2 T3Theme 5Theme 6Upscaling Partners
  • 19. GRiSP Theme 1Genetic DiversityGRiSP Theme 2BreedingGRiSP Theme 5Policy and ImpactGRiSP Theme 6Capacity and DeliveryGRiSP Theme 4Value addingGRiSP Theme 3NRMSLO1 Rural PovertySLO3 Nutrition and healthSLO2 Food Security SLO4 SustainabilityGene Bank; Novelgene pool;Valuable-trait genesBreeding tools;breeding lines; (hybrid)varieties for biotic andabiotic stress, highyield, nutritious valueResource-use efficient, lowcarbon-footprint managementpractices; Adaptations tostresses and Climate Change;Mechanized and DiversifiedsystemsPost-harvest technologies,Strategies for marketaccess, Specialty rices,Novel rice-based productsC4 riceInformation and toolsfor technologytargeting; Impactassessments; Globalrice information forpolicy analysisTools for communication andExtension; Models and toolsfor capacity building;Platforms for innovation anddelivery; Seed and varietydelivery systemsNARES and ARIsuse tools, genes,(pre-)breeding linesto develop improvedlocal rice varietiesPro-poor and pro-genderimproved managementpractices locally adaptedby NARES and promotedby public, NGO, andprivate sectorPost-harvest technologies,market-access solutions,and value-added productslocally adapted by NARESLocal policy makers anddecision takersenlightened about ricepolicy opportunitiesExtension, delivery, andcapacity building modelsemployed by local stakeholdersFunctional(public, NGO, private) local rice seeddeliverysystems/marketsFarmers adoptimproved andnutritious ricevarietiesFarmers adoptsustainable andenvironmentally-friendlyrice managementpracticesRice value-chain actorsadopt improved post-harvest practicesNew cadre of high-quality riceresearchers and extensionagents; extended partnershipsfor delivery and impact atscalePolicies in place thatsupport positiveimpact from riceresearchIncreased rice yieldIncreased riceproductionEnhancedecosystem resilienceReduced pesticideuseIncreased water,labor, and energyuse efficiencyIncreased consumptionof nutritious riceStable and affordableprice of riceIncreased expandable income on nonriceitems by poor rice farmers (and urbandwellers)Stable and sufficientmarket availability ofriceIncreased income byactors in the ricevalue chainReduced cost of riceproductionReduced mycotoxincontamination in riceFarmers produce value-added and novel productsReduced GHGemissions. carbonfootprint in riceproduction Reduced post-harvest loss in riceIncreased value addingin the rice value chainIntermediateDevelopmentOutcomeResearchOutcomeOutputs: productsEnd userPartnersEnablingactionsLocal rice seed distributionsystems deployedEnablingactionsIncreased health of ricefarmers and riceconsumersUrban PovertyBreeders effectivelyaccess genebank fortrait miningImproved andacceleratedvarietydevelopmentwith novel traitsIncreased womenempowerrmentParticipation ofwomen in decisionmakingMDG: reduced poverty MDG: increased gender equity
  • 20. • Gender research: Assess social and gender issues in therice sector, gender-differentiated impact of GRiSP‟sproducts and services on productivity, livelihoods, nutrition,health and sustainable natural resources management(Theme 5)• Gender mainstreaming: Ensure that the development ofGRiSP „s products and services takes gender differencesinto account and addresses the specific needs andpreferences of women (Themes 2,3,4,6)• Gender capacity enhancement: Enhance the capacity ofwomen to participate in planning, execution, monitoring andevaluation of research, extension and provision of advisoryservices, and development (Theme 6)Gender objectives
  • 21. GRiSP Gender impact pathwaySustainablymanagednaturalresourcesImprovedfood securityReducedruralpovertyImprovednutrition andhealthCGIAR Development OutcomesIncreased productivityfrom women activitiesIncreased womenlabour productivityLabour-savingtechnologiesFreed up timeReduceddrudgeryIncreased off-farmincomeAssist children witheducationImproved hygieneand sanitationIncreased marketablesurplus by womenIncreasedwomen‟sincomeIncreasedresourcesspent onnutritious foodIncreased resourcesspent on childreneducationPro-genderproduction andpost-harvesttechnologiesPro-genderextensionservicesT2,3T3T4T6T5
  • 22. Capacity BuildingAging cohort of scientists: graduate(under, post) scholarships (GRISS)Retooling of advisory services.1. New landscape: public extensionservices, private sector, NGOs, etc2. New tools: ICT3. New knowledgeTooling farmers as modern entrepreneursTooling value-chain businesses
  • 23. Attribution and Contribution1. Attribution: “full-blown” impactassessment with control groups andcounterfactuals2. Contribution: credible evidence thatall links in the impact pathway havebeen addressed (theory of change)i. Products, servicesii. Enabling environment=> Indicators of progress
  • 24. Evidence of progressProductPilot site farmeradopters, andbenefits seenLarge scaledisseminationLarge numbersof farmers adoptIncreasedproductivitySLO (food securitypoverty, sustainability, H&N)Assumption: product responds tofarmers’ needsRisk: product not adoptedAssumptions: partners disseminateproduct; benefits accrue toadoptersRisk: products not adoptedAssumption: product responds toa need on large scale; benefitsaccrue to adoptersRisk: practices are not adoptedAssumption:product actuallydelivers its benefitsConduct of Needs andOpportunities Assessments;target domainidentification, involvement offarmers in development ofproduct (participatoryapproaches); developtechnologies with local R&Dpartners, scientific evidence thatporduct ‘works’Involvement of partners inproduct development;capacity building of partners;development of businessmodels; demonstratedbenefits to adoptersAwareness campaigns,demonstration fields,marketing by private sector,penetrate remote areas(identification of target domain– see below)See early action atdevelopment of improvedpracticeAssumptions and risks Enabling actionsCollaborative partneradopters, andbenefits seenGRiSP“Outside”
  • 25. Indicator IDO Theme Asia Africa Latin America GlobalIndia-BiharIndia-OdissaB‟desh-South,coastalMyanmar-cebtral,deltaVietnam-SouthLaos,cambodiaPhilippinesNigeriaGhanaTanzaniaMozambiqueSenegalMadagascarColombiaVenezuelaNicaraguaUruguay,RGS-Brasil1 Genetic gain 1 1,2 x x X2 Farmers‟ yield 1 2,3 x x x x X3 Water productivity 2,4 34 Fertilizer productivity 2,4 35 Consumer expenditureon rice3 5 X6 Income from rice farming 3 57 Pesticide use 4 38 Greenhouse gasemissions4 3 X9 Post-harvest loss 5 410 Value added throughspecialty products5 411 Nutrition parameter tbd 6 212 Area under adoption ofnew technologies1-6 2,3,5,6 X13 # Farmers adopting newtechnologies1-6 2,3,5,6 X14 Rice genetic diversityparameter tbd7 1,2 X15 Improved deliverypartners and serviceproviders8 616 Women empowermentIndex9 517 Peer-reviewed Journalpublications; otherpublications1-9 1-6 X18 Capacity built (graduateand post-graduate; shortterm; by male/female)1-9 1-6 X
  • 26. Global RiceHarvested Area(M ha)Production rough rice(M t)Yield rough rice(t/ha)World 154 672 4.4Asia 137 607 4.5Latin America 6 25 4.5Africa (SS) 9 23 2.5Rest of World 3 17 6.7
  • 27. Rice Sector Development Hubs
  • 28. South AsiaSTRASACSISACSISA-Bihar
  • 29. CalabozoMonteríaIbaguéPalmiraAipeSanta RosaTorresCamaquáCachoeirinhaUruguaianaSanta Vitoria do PalmarCorrientesTreinta y TresArtigasTropicalTemperateSede del FLARHot SpotViveros VIOFLARRed de Mejoramiento del FLAR
  • 30. • South Asia: deep poverty, hunger, CC–Stress environment (drought, salinity, submergence); homefood security; stress tolerance, risk–Irrigated environment: yield, national food security, export• Vietnam: export, quality, value chain, reducedenvironmental footprint, labeling• Philippines: self sufficiency, yield• Myanmar: „everything‟• SSA: import substitution, yield, quality, value chain• Latin America–temperate; export, quality, reduced environmental footprint–Tropical: yield, home food security, povertyDiverse priorities
  • 31. Global Intermediate DevelopmentOutcomes and targets–Global food security -> improved markets andaffordable market price, trade flows, sustainabilitycriteria (SRP) and value chains–Global poverty alleviation, eg in mega-cities outsiderice-production areaRegional/national IntermediateDevelopment Outcomes and targetsGlobal vs Regional targets
  • 32. The realization of IDOs is, however, not undercontrol of the CRPs and depends on multiple,often iterative steps conducted by other playersand necessarily with substantial additionalinvestment (typically 10 x). While the CRPs areaccountable for their outputs and have somecontrol over the near-term adoption and use oftheir research results, the development outcomesoccur, particularly at scale, as a result ofactivities, policies and investments outside theCGIAR [CRP]”ISPC: Strengthening Strategy and Results Framework through PrioritizationPartners for development outcomes
  • 33. CORRA: Council forPartnerships on Rice Researchin AsiaIRRIAfricaRiceCIATJIRCASCiradIRDCRP 3.3IndiaChinaPhilippinesLaosCambodiaBangladeshFLAR: Latin American Fund forIrrigated RiceRRRTC-WCA:Regional RiceResearch andTraining Centre forWest and CentralAsiaAfricaRice council of ministersCARDGRiSPGRiSP upscaling partnersNGOs: CRS,WV, BRAC, …PrivatesectorARIsNARESCRP 3.3 and GRiSP
  • 34. CORRA: Council forPartnerships on Rice Researchin AsiaIRRIAfricaRiceCIATJIRCASCiradIRDCRP 3.3IndiaChinaPhilippinesLaosCambodiaBangladeshFLAR: Latin American Fund forIrrigated RiceRRRTC-WCA:Regional RiceResearch andTraining Centre forWest and CentralAsiaAfricaRice council of ministersCARDGRiSPGRiSP upscalingpartnersNGOs: CRS,WV, BRAC, …PrivatesectorARIsNARESCGIAR: W 1,2(25%)CGIAR: W 3Bilateral (75%)Own fundingDistributedfunding
  • 35. Results-Based Financing CRP 3.3Minimum commitment 55 M $/y from W1,2 CGIARfor:1. Research and Product development CGIARcenters IRRI, AfricaRice, CIAT (40 M)2. Partnershipsa) GRiSP network support to partners (1 M)b) Discovery Research (5 M)c) Upscaling products and services (5 M)d) Boosting gender-equity outcomes (2 M)e) Capacity building/GRISS (2 M)W3 and bilateral grants to CRP 3.3/CGIAR Centerscomplement above activities
  • 36. Fast-tracking RBM in GRiSP I2014-2015: develop and put in place a SMARTsystem of indicator collection, aggregation, analysisand evaluation; target setting and implementationwith partners, trainingRegional: in key target areas: surveys (tablets),measurements, local stastistics and data basesGlobal: aggregation and synthesis of the above,(inter)national databases, modeling, RS, GISRough cost: 5 M$
  • 37. http://www.grisp.net“A US$ 20investmentin GRiSPwill lift oneperson outof poverty.”
  • 38. Thanks for your attention
  • 39. Theme 1 ----- Theme 2, 3,4 -------------------------- Theme 5 Theme 6Genes, varieties,managementtechnologies,informationgateway, models,data, tools,capacity, etcProductslocallyadapted andpromoted bypublic, NGO,and privatesectorProductsadopted byfarmers, valuechain actors,policy makers,otherstakeholdersIncreasednutritious riceproductionStable andaffordableprice of riceIncreasedresource useefficiencyRural PovertyNutrition andhealthFood SecuritySustainabilityProducts Intermediate Development Outcomes ImpactDevelopment partnershipsScience partnershipsTimelineFarmers: 1000s 10.000s 100.000s millionsGRiSPCGIAR outcomes
  • 40. • To increase rice productivity throughdevelopment of improved varieties and othertechnologies along the value chain• To foster more sustainable rice-basedproduction systems that use resources moreefficiently• To improve the efficiency and equity of the ricesector through better and more accessibleinformation and strengthened deliverymechanisms (“enabling environment”)GRiSP Objectives
  • 41. GRiSP research themes1. Conserving genetic diversity; genediscovery2. Development of improved varieties3. Sustainable management practices4. Value adding (post harvest, new products)5. Technology targeting and policy6. Partnerships for large-scaleimpact, capacity building)
  • 42. Outputs: products and servicesProduct Line 3.1. Future management systems for efficient rice monocultureProduct 3.1.1. Strategies to increase water use efficiencyProduct 3.1.2. Principles and tools for site-specific nutrient managementProduct 3.1.3. Management options for pests, weeds, and diseasesProduct 3.1.4. Integrated Good Agricul-tural Practices (GAP)Product Line 3.2. Resource-conserving technologies for diversified farming systemsProduct 3.2.1. Diversified cropping systems in AsiaProduct 3.2.2. Mechanization and conservation agricultureProduct Line 3.3. Management innovations for poor farmers in rainfed and stress-prone areasProduct 3.3.1. Management options for drought, submergence, and salinityProduct 3.3.2. Management options for pests, diseases, and weedsProduct 3.3.3. Mechanization and Conserva-tion Agriculture for low-input and upland systemsProduct 3.3.4. Land and water develop-ment options for inland valleysProduct Line 3.4. Increasing resilience to climate change and reducing global warming potentialProduct 3.4.1. Assessment tools (ecological resilience, impact of climate change, adaptivevalue of response options)Product 3.4.2. Field management technologies to reduce green-house gas emissionsProduct 3.4.3. Strategies to adapt to climate change and increase resilience
  • 43. > 25 years of „discovery science‟: gene, markers,…11 million ha flood proneSwarna-Sub117 d submergenceSubmergence-tolerant rice
  • 44. 2006: Swarna-Sub1 developed by marker assisted backcrossingFarmers‟ submergence tolerant landraces collected; FR13A1950 1978 1990 2000 2010Gene bank screened; FR13A identifiedSemi-dwarf & submergence tol. combinedFirst high-yielding dwarf varieties1995: Sub1 mapped to Chr. 9Fine mapping & marker development initiated2002: Swarna crossed with IR49830-7 (Sub1)2006: Sub1-A gene conferring submergence tolerance2009: Swarna-Sub1 released in Indian, Indonesia, IR64-Sub1 in Indonesia, Philippines2008: Sub1-A mode of action: inhibit response to GA2010: Two Sub1 varieties released in Bangladesh
  • 45. Swarna-Sub1 Timeline inin India2006 2007 2008 2009 20102 kg~ 700 ~5,000PartnersNARES(2)NARES(8)+NGOs, FOs, Seed Co (P)(22)+ NFSM, StateGovs., Seed Co(P&Pv), NGOs,IPs (54)100public &privatesectorMultiplication EvaluationEvaluation, DemonstrationSeed Mult (boro)Release(June), SeedMult. (BS+TL), Demonstr.100 kg 3,000 kg 15 tonsBS: 170 tTL: 450 tFS : > 500BS/FS/CS/TL,10,000 t(+FS)>100,000ActivitiesSeedamountNo. ofFarmersDissemination, adoption, tacking& impact assessment2011>130public &privatesectorsBS/FS/CS/TL,40000 t(+FS)1.3 mil20124.0 milSwarna-Sub1 reached about 3 million farmersin India and 0.5 million in Bangladesh by 2012and B’DeshBreeding status Africa 2011: sub1 works inelite African rice germplasm WITA 4 x Swarna sub1 BC2F1 NERICA L-19 x IR64 sub1 F1 FARO 57 x Swarna sub1 BC1F1October 2012: urgent request from NigerianMinister of Agriculture for submergencetolerant rice
  • 46. 12 million ha salt affected10 days submergedin saline waterSub1 only SalTol+ Sub1New Products: “2 in 1”Submergence + salinity tolerance
  • 47. GRiSP ObjectivesProductivity Sustainability Efficient sector
  • 48. 926128513152125India131 partnersBangladesh310Irrigated Rice research ConsortiumSri Lanka
  • 49. Drought-proneSubmergence-proneSalt-affectedUplandsConsortium for Unfavorable RiceEnvironments26 partners
  • 50. Myanmar