Lenhart, A., Madden, M., MacGill, A.R., Smith, A., (2007, December 19).  Teens and Social Media . Washington, D.C.: Pew In...
N=9
 
 
 
 
<ul><li>36%  -  Several times daily </li></ul><ul><li>27%  -  About once a day </li></ul><ul><li>26%  -  Weekly  </li></ul...
<ul><li>100%  -  Several times daily </li></ul><ul><li>0%  -  About once a day </li></ul><ul><li>0%  -  Weekly  </li></ul>...
<ul><li>100%  Send or Read Email </li></ul><ul><li>56%  Send Msgs on a Social Network    Site (SNS) </li></ul><ul><li>22% ...
Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., Zickuhr, K. (2010 February, 3).  Social Media and Mobile Internet Use Among Teens & Y...
 
Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., Zickuhr, K. (2010 February, 3).  Social Media and Mobile Internet Use Among Teens & Y...
<ul><li>Web as platform for services </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous improvement (beta) </li></ul><ul><li>Rich user interface...
 
<ul><li>Web services that allow users to: </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate, remix </li></ul><ul><li>Dynamically update (RSS) ...
<ul><li>Web 1.0 was all about connecting people. It was an interactive space, and I think Web 2.0 is of course,  a piece o...
<ul><li>We are Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Products services internet social-interactive features  collaborate remix  </li><...
 
<ul><li>Allows Students’ Input </li></ul><ul><li>Collective Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Visualization of Themes </li></...
 
<ul><li>Good for resource-sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Develop & show personal library/interests </li></ul><ul><li>Find commu...
 
Barron, B. (2006) in Human Development, 49, 193-224.
 
<ul><li>Online journals  written by individuals ( bloggers ) or collaborations;  may be topic-focused or stream of conscio...
3 rd  most popular social networking technology Users publish ‘ Tweets ’ of  140 Characters * Follower  structure * Live s...
<ul><li>Websites  that allow uploading  of video/audio clips or photos </li></ul>
<ul><li>iTunes:  an audio playback program developed by Apple. Use iTunes to import songs from CDs, etc. The program can a...
<ul><li>Social networking sites allow people to : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and customize a multi-media “My Profile”  <...
 
 
<ul><li>Instant Messaging (IM) </li></ul><ul><li>Typically online/computer program </li></ul><ul><li>Real-time </li></ul><...
 
 
 
2004-2005 100s  niche networks Facebook & MySpace get more hits than Google.  More popular than virtual gaming environments
Facebook -  about ½ are college age (18-24) MySpace -  arts, music, visual; 85% are 18+ LinkedIn –  career-oriented, profe...
<ul><li>65%  of U.S. teens (12-17) use SNS </li></ul><ul><li>85%  of college students (18-24) use an SNS </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Many different age groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>25-34 pop on Facebook is doubling every 6 mths </li></ul></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>People as important as Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>User-generated Profile  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customizab...
<ul><ul><li>Instant messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio--  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
 
<ul><li>Identity Development </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship Building </li></ul><ul><li>Peer Support </li></ul>
<ul><li>If it was really exciting I would post about it. . . . I remember the second I was done I got on MS and I was like...
<ul><li>I dentity work online : the “construction of cool” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-reflection on gender, sexual identit...
<ul><li>SNSs may help users build more and stronger relationships of various types: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridging capital...
<ul><ul><li>[I learn] more things and deeper things about t </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>their personality.  Like at school ...
<ul><ul><li>I get more information [about a person] that I wouldn’t have otherwise…their relationship status; what college...
<ul><li>Blurs social &  education-related task  support </li></ul>I was online and I opened up my Word document to type it...
It’s going to be so hard going out there by myself [to college faraway where she is the only Hmong girl] so I’m gonna need...
<ul><li>Technological fluencies </li></ul><ul><li>Communication/Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul>Peopl...
<ul><li>People create learning contexts for themselves (offline-online spaces blurred) </li></ul><ul><li>Youth-initiated i...
 
Tell Your Child’s Story Create a Personal Online Health Record
<ul><li>http://www.imedix.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Members of the iMedix community share their experiences and rank medical ...
 
<ul><li>http://www.patientslikeme.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>To enable people to share information that can improve the lives ...
 
<ul><li>Follow f2f with online connection.  Network. </li></ul><ul><li>Incentivize learning the online community  features...
<ul><li>Know the Terms of Service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Age limitations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No drug talk, nudity, d...
<ul><li>Educator & Researcher at intersection of:  </li></ul><ul><li>learning technologies, communication,  &  new media s...
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Web 2.0 and The National Educational Technology Plan

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  • 93% Email (up from 87% in 2004) 73% Maintain a SNS profile 66-50% Send Msgs on a Social Network 37% Msg daily through an SNS
  • 93% Email (up from 87% in 2004) 73% Maintain a SNS profile 66-50% Send Msgs on a Social Network 37% Msg daily through an SNS
  • Micro-content Social software
  • http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/2428335/Web_2.0_Tag_Cloud
  • http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/university-campus-ban-on-social-media-for-one-week/6160?tag=nl.e539
  • Students’ Input Collective intelligence Visualization of Themes Create in: www.wordle.net www.tagcrowd.com
  • flirting is sending nude or semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone: instead of &amp;quot;texting,&amp;quot; they call it called &amp;quot;sexting.&amp;quot;
  • flirting is sending nude or semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone: instead of &amp;quot;texting,&amp;quot; they call it called &amp;quot;sexting.&amp;quot;
  • flirting is sending nude or semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone: instead of &amp;quot;texting,&amp;quot; they call it called &amp;quot;sexting.&amp;quot;
  • flirting is sending nude or semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone: instead of &amp;quot;texting,&amp;quot; they call it called &amp;quot;sexting.&amp;quot;
  • flirting is sending nude or semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone: instead of &amp;quot;texting,&amp;quot; they call it called &amp;quot;sexting.&amp;quot;
  • As we think about the relationship-building components of Ramp-Up: connecting peers with each other and supportive others – I’d like to talk with you about how students are connecting with each other today using technologies and how they are using Social Network sites in particular for communicative and relationship-building purposes.
  • ** Mention Age, Race, Gender differentials **Anecdote on how I have 3 accounts - This spring, we studied low-income HS students on MySpace – transition to Facebook when they go to college – etc. SOURCES comScore http://www.comscore.com/press/release.asp?press=1519 Forrester Research http://www.web-strategist.com/blog/2008/01/09/social-network-stats-facebook-myspace-reunion-jan-2008/ ADDITION NOTES IF NEEDED: Facebook – founded in February 2004 by Marc Zuckerberg Facebook is the 6th most-trafficked website in the United States (comScore) The fastest growing demographic is those 25 years old and older People spend an average of 20 minutes on the site daily (comScore) MySpace – founded by Tom Wolfe MySpace is the #1 most trafficked social Web site (comScore) Has the broadest appeal across ages (comScore 2006) -- 2/3 are 25+ LinkedIn Xanga, Hi5 – draws a younger crowd ==================================================================== Diversity &amp; Differences among Race, Class, and Gender Hargittai , E. (2007). Whose space? Differences among users and non-users of social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication , 13 (1), article 14. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol13/issue1/hargittai.html A person&apos;s gender, race and ethnicity, and parental educational background are all associated with use, but in most cases only when the aggregate concept of social network sites is disaggregated by service. Additionally, people with more experience and autonomy of use are more likely to be users.
  • “ people now have extended networks that they increasingly turn to make important life decisions?”
  • Individuals are involved in many settings Boundaries between settings can be permeable Interest Driven Activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time , freedom and resources . What is learned outside school can shape what is learned school as students seek out interest-driven projects School projects can stimulate students’ interest that can motivate them to seem more information, opportunities and people with whom to learn on their own terms
  • Ellison, Steinfield, and Campe (2007), drawing on social capital theory, found that strong and weak ties are sustained on SNSs. In surveying undergraduates at Michigan State, they found that intensive use of Facebook was associated with higher levels of three types of social capital: bridging capital or our “friends of friends” that afford us diverse perspectives and new information; bonding capital or “the shoulder to cry on” that comes from our close friends and family; and maintained social capital, a concept the researchers developed to describe the ability to “mobilize resources from a previously inhabited network, such as one’s high school” (Ellison, 2008, p. 22; Ellison, Steinfeld, &amp; Lampe, 2007). The researchers found that bridging social capital was the most valued use of Facebook. They suggested that networking may help to crystallize relationships that ”might otherwise remain ephemeral” (p. 25), encouraging users to strengthen latent ties and maintain connections with former friends, thus allowing people to stay connected as they move from one offline community to another. Interestingly, the researchers found that the influence of Facebook on bridging social capital is particularly strong for those with low self-esteem (Ellison et al., 2007). Thus, when we are experiencing discomfort, uncertainty, or life transitions (e.g., enrollment in college, dissolution of a relationship, career indecision, etc.) our extended “weak ties” through social network sites may prove especially beneficial in expanding our outlook and broadening our base of support (Granovetter, 1973).
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • Ellison, Steinfield, and Campe (2007), drawing on social capital theory, found that strong and weak ties are sustained on SNSs. In surveying undergraduates at Michigan State, they found that intensive use of Facebook was associated with higher levels of three types of social capital: bridging capital or our “friends of friends” that afford us diverse perspectives and new information; bonding capital or “the shoulder to cry on” that comes from our close friends and family; and maintained social capital, a concept the researchers developed to describe the ability to “mobilize resources from a previously inhabited network, such as one’s high school” (Ellison, 2008, p. 22; Ellison, Steinfeld, &amp; Lampe, 2007). The researchers found that bridging social capital was the most valued use of Facebook. They suggested that networking may help to crystallize relationships that ”might otherwise remain ephemeral” (p. 25), encouraging users to strengthen latent ties and maintain connections with former friends, thus allowing people to stay connected as they move from one offline community to another. Interestingly, the researchers found that the influence of Facebook on bridging social capital is particularly strong for those with low self-esteem (Ellison et al., 2007). Thus, when we are experiencing discomfort, uncertainty, or life transitions (e.g., enrollment in college, dissolution of a relationship, career indecision, etc.) our extended “weak ties” through social network sites may prove especially beneficial in expanding our outlook and broadening our base of support (Granovetter, 1973).
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms.
  • (1) Lenhart, A. &amp; Madden, M. (2007, January). Social Networking Websites and Teens: An Overview http://www.pewinternet.org/pdfs/PIP_SNS_Data_Memo_Jan_2007.pdf (2) Study with 600 high school juniors and seniors from low-income families and in-depth interviews, talk alouds and content analysis with a subset of randomly selected users. Among the key findings: • 55% of online teens have created a personal profile online, and 55% have used social networking sites like MySpace or Facebook. • 66% of teens who have created a profile say that their profile is not visible by all internet users. They limit access to their profiles. • 48% of teens visit social networking websites daily or more often; 26% visit once a day, 22% visit several times a day. • Older girls ages 15-17 are more likely to have used social networking sites and online profiles; 70% of older girls have used an online social network compared with 54% of older boys, and 70% of older girls have created an online profile, while only 57% boys have done so. Teens say social networking sites help them manage their friendships • 91% of all social networking teens say they use the sites to stay in touch with friends they see frequently, while 82% use the sites to stay in touch with friends they rarely see in person. • 72% of all social networking teens use the sites to make plans with friends; 49% use the sites to make new friends. • Older boys who use social networking sites (ages 15-17) are more likely than girls of the same age to say that they use social networking sites to make new friends (60% vs. 46%). • Just 17% of all social networking teens use the sites to flirt. • Older boys who use social networking sites are more than twice as likely as older girls to say they use the sites to flirt; 29% report this compared with just 13% of older girls. ====================================================================================== From Pew, Teens &amp; Social Media (2007, December 17) Similarly, 59% create multi-media content (art, stories, photos, videos, Web page ) Content Creators are online teens who have created or worked on a blog or webpage , shared original creative content , or remixed content they found online into a new creation The growth in blogs tracks with the growth in teens’ use of social networking sites, but they do not completely overlap. -Two in five (42%) teens who use social networking sites also say they blog. Seven in ten (70%) social networking teens report reading the blogs of others, and three in four social networking teens (76%) have posted comments to a friend’s blog on a social networking site. Online boys are avid users of video-sharing websites such as YouTube, and boys are more likely than girls to upload. Digital images – stills and videos – have a big role in teen life. Posting them often starts a virtual conversation. Most teens receive some feedback on the content they post online -39% of online teens share their own artistic creations online, such as artwork, photos, stories, or videos, up from 33% in 2004. -33% create or work on webpages or blogs for others, including those for groups they belong to, friends, or school assignments, basically unchanged from 2004 (32%). -28% have created their own online journal or blog, up from 19% in 2004. -27% maintain their own personal webpage, up from 22% in 2004. -26% remix content they find online into their own creations, up from 19% in 2004.
  • Grounded in sociocultural, activity, and situated learning theories (Cole 1996; Engestrom 1987; Greeno 1989; Vygotsky 1978), a learning ecology perspective (Barron 2006) may be most useful in helping us conceptualize and bridge learning across the spaces of home, school, work, and community. Barron (2006) defines a learning ecology as the “set of contexts found in physical or virtual spaces that provide opportunities for learning” (195). This notion of a learning ecology stipulates that: adolescents are simultaneously involved in many settings; they create learning contexts for themselves within and across settings; the boundaries between settings can be permeable; and interest-driven activities can span contextual boundaries and be self-sustaining given adequate time, freedom and resources (Barron 2006, 199-201). In other words, what is learned outside of school can shape what is learned in school as students seek out projects based on their interests. In turn, school projects can stimulate students’ interest which can motivate them to seek more information, opportunities, and like-minded people with whom to learn on their own terms. Identity development &amp; self-promotion – “see all sides of me” Social life development – stay in touch, make plans, make friends Academic support – on-call, collective “help” Career support – although students don’t always realize how to use it
  • EXAMPLES -- NO DRUG TALK, NO NUDITY, NO PICTURES OF DRINKING, NOHATE SPEECH, NO BULLYING, AND NO POSTING PARTY LOCATIONS-ALL OF COULD LEAD TO A “SLAP IN THE FACE” LATER ON. MOST OF ALL, REMEMBER -- TEENS AND EVERYONE -- THAT WHAT YOU PUT ONLINE CAN BE IN THE CYBERWORLD FOREVER.  4. TIPS for PARENTS:  -ALLOW KIDS SPACE TO EXPERIMENT BUT WITH GOOD GUIDANCE  Ex: Don’t overly comment and be present on your child’s Facebook pageEx. Don’t friend your children’s friends ---would you sit at their school lunch table? - DISCUSS FACEBOOK’S POLICIES AND TERMS  -BE A ROLE MODEL  -PICK YOUR BATTLES. If your child has allowed you into his/her friend network, return the favor by not commenting on transgressions you may see-Keep comments on child’s profile page spare - Tackle serious issues face-to-face in private
  • Web 2.0 and The National Educational Technology Plan

    1. 1. Lenhart, A., Madden, M., MacGill, A.R., Smith, A., (2007, December 19). Teens and Social Media . Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet Studies .
    2. 2. N=9
    3. 7. <ul><li>36% - Several times daily </li></ul><ul><li>27% - About once a day </li></ul><ul><li>26% - Weekly </li></ul><ul><li>11% - Less than once a week </li></ul>Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., Zickuhr, K. (2010 February, 3). Social Media and Mobile Internet Use Among Teens & Young Adults . Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet Studies.
    4. 8. <ul><li>100% - Several times daily </li></ul><ul><li>0% - About once a day </li></ul><ul><li>0% - Weekly </li></ul><ul><li>0% - Less than once a week </li></ul>
    5. 9. <ul><li>100% Send or Read Email </li></ul><ul><li>56% Send Msgs on a Social Network Site (SNS) </li></ul><ul><li>22% Comment on a blog </li></ul><ul><li>11% Write in my own blog </li></ul><ul><li>11% Show content online I created </li></ul><ul><li>33% Remix online content </li></ul>
    6. 10. Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., Zickuhr, K. (2010 February, 3). Social Media and Mobile Internet Use Among Teens & Young Adults . Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet Studies. EDCI TEENS Email 100% 93% (up from 87% in 2004) Maintain a SNS profile 56% (n=5) 73% Send Msgs on a Social Network 56% 66-50% (varies by group or private msg) Msg daily through an SNS 33% 37%
    7. 12. Lenhart, A., Purcell, K., Smith, A., Zickuhr, K. (2010 February, 3). Social Media and Mobile Internet Use Among Teens & Young Adults . Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet Studies. EDCI TEENS Comment on a blog 22% 52% (in social network sites) Write in my own blog 11% 14% (drop from 28% in 2006) Show content online I created 11% 38% Remix online content 33% 21%
    8. 13. <ul><li>Web as platform for services </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous improvement (beta) </li></ul><ul><li>Rich user interfaces </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture of participation (self-serve) </li></ul><ul><li>Design for hackability & remixability </li></ul><ul><li>Data transformability </li></ul>
    9. 15. <ul><li>Web services that allow users to: </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate, remix </li></ul><ul><li>Dynamically update (RSS) </li></ul><ul><li>Interact </li></ul><ul><li>innovate </li></ul><ul><li>Be irreverent </li></ul><ul><li>Foster Openness, Folksonomies </li></ul><ul><li>Micro-content sharing between domains, servers, machines (Google Maps) </li></ul>
    10. 16. <ul><li>Web 1.0 was all about connecting people. It was an interactive space, and I think Web 2.0 is of course, a piece of jargon , nobody even knows what it means. If Web 2.0 for you is blogs and wikis, then that is people to people? </li></ul><ul><li>- Tim Berners-Lee </li></ul>
    11. 17. <ul><li>We are Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Products services internet social-interactive features collaborate remix </li></ul><ul><li>added- value interact be creative dynamic RSS chronological auto updating </li></ul><ul><li>Social software live democratic no-hierarchy irreverent micro-content </li></ul><ul><li>discursive powerful tool powerful arena user-created interactive categories </li></ul><ul><li>of technologies Web 2.0 represents best ideas from teaching and thinking </li></ul><ul><li>cooperative learning not new Facebook openness to end users participation </li></ul><ul><li>change and modify for the better by different people people put their </li></ul><ul><li>insight in users can share different insights or points of view interest-driven </li></ul><ul><li>users evolve the (non) final product co-construction co-creation open source </li></ul><ul><li>an attitude not a technology Platform Services Users as Co-developers The </li></ul><ul><li>Long Tail customer self-service beta light programming cooperation interact </li></ul><ul><li>collaborate share data information microcontent cross-platform openness </li></ul><ul><li>folksonomy user-defined linkages between users and content share </li></ul><ul><li>multimedia content personal profiling intertechnology applications </li></ul>
    12. 19. <ul><li>Allows Students’ Input </li></ul><ul><li>Collective Intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Visualization of Themes </li></ul><ul><li>Sites for creating Tag Clouds or Word Clouds </li></ul><ul><li>www.wordle.net </li></ul><ul><li>www.tagcrowd.com </li></ul>http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/2428335/Web_2.0_Tag_Cloud EDCI Web 2.0 Tag Cloud in Wordle
    13. 21. <ul><li>Good for resource-sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Develop & show personal library/interests </li></ul><ul><li>Find community </li></ul><ul><li>Best teaching practices (constructivist) </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>Archival </li></ul><ul><li>Timeliness /Data updating </li></ul><ul><li>Exotic perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Learning curve </li></ul><ul><li>Intrusive – requires your information to open an account </li></ul><ul><li>Need to evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>Mile-wide-inch-deep understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Authorship </li></ul><ul><li>Addiction </li></ul>
    14. 23. Barron, B. (2006) in Human Development, 49, 193-224.
    15. 25. <ul><li>Online journals written by individuals ( bloggers ) or collaborations; may be topic-focused or stream of consciousness. May include audio, video, images, etc. Increasingly important source of news (e.g., Huffington Post). </li></ul>
    16. 26. 3 rd most popular social networking technology Users publish ‘ Tweets ’ of 140 Characters * Follower structure * Live searching (e.g., #inauguration) * Link-sharing to longer Web content (e.g., articles, discussions, posts, videos)
    17. 27. <ul><li>Websites that allow uploading of video/audio clips or photos </li></ul>
    18. 28. <ul><li>iTunes: an audio playback program developed by Apple. Use iTunes to import songs from CDs, etc. The program can also download songs (for a small fee) from the iTunes Music Store. </li></ul><ul><li>Podcast: combines the terms iPod and broadcast . They are audio and video broadcasts that can be played on an iPod or on the computer through iTunes. </li></ul>
    19. 29. <ul><li>Social networking sites allow people to : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create and customize a multi-media “My Profile” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Link to other people & content (e.g., “friend”, “share”) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make, view & traverse connections to others </li></ul></ul>Niche Social Network sites http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_social_networking_websites
    20. 32. <ul><li>Instant Messaging (IM) </li></ul><ul><li>Typically online/computer program </li></ul><ul><li>Real-time </li></ul><ul><li>Pop-up window </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-media not just text </li></ul><ul><li>Texting </li></ul><ul><li>Typically via cell phone </li></ul><ul><li>Real-time or inbox message </li></ul><ul><li>Covert </li></ul><ul><li>Written text </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sexting” </li></ul><ul><li>Flirting by sending semi-nude photos from cell phone to cell phone </li></ul>
    21. 36. 2004-2005 100s niche networks Facebook & MySpace get more hits than Google. More popular than virtual gaming environments
    22. 37. Facebook - about ½ are college age (18-24) MySpace - arts, music, visual; 85% are 18+ LinkedIn – career-oriented, professional Source : ComScore January, 2009
    23. 38. <ul><li>65% of U.S. teens (12-17) use SNS </li></ul><ul><li>85% of college students (18-24) use an SNS </li></ul><ul><li>The majority use SNS daily: devoting an average of 9 hours/week </li></ul><ul><li>Twin Cities teens (17-18) from low-income families (n=600), 77% use an SNS </li></ul>
    24. 39. <ul><li>Many different age groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>25-34 pop on Facebook is doubling every 6 mths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>35-54 fastest growing demographic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>13+ age requirement; Parental consent <13 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Genders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>About equal but slightly more females </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ethnicities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Certain groups favor certain sites </li></ul></ul>
    25. 40. <ul><li>People as important as Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>User-generated Profile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customizable and multi-media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Link to other People & Content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linkages are made Visible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulate a list of other users with whom you share a connection: ‘Friends’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Browse & Traverse others’ networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Rolodex effect’ - build your network from others’ </li></ul></ul>
    26. 41. <ul><ul><li>Instant messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Email </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio-- </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>playing, commenting, sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video-- </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>editing, commenting, playing, sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Image/photo-- </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>editing, commenting, sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogging & “kudos” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commenting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bulletin boards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Groups to join </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customizable Designs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Searchability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Multiple audiences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Replicability </li></ul></ul>
    27. 43. <ul><li>Identity Development </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship Building </li></ul><ul><li>Peer Support </li></ul>
    28. 44. <ul><li>If it was really exciting I would post about it. . . . I remember the second I was done I got on MS and I was like [in his post]: ‘I just finished my extended essay and it was really great and its awesome.’ And that is an example of my emotions </li></ul><ul><li>(Jeremy, high school student) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Multi-media platform for self-presentation & impression management </li></ul></ul>
    29. 45. <ul><li>I dentity work online : the “construction of cool” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-reflection on gender, sexual identity, ethnicity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Concealment versus revelation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sometimes when I feel kind of kid-dish I will put on pastel looking backgrounds or if feel like serious </li></ul><ul><li>than I put on black backgrounds but I must remain feminine, so what I have right now is a black background with pink flowers. </li></ul><ul><li>(Lily, high school student). </li></ul>
    30. 46. <ul><li>SNSs may help users build more and stronger relationships of various types: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridging capital: our “friends of friends” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bonding capital: “shoulder to cry on” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintained capital : our “ability to mobilize resources from previous network” (e.g., high school friends, foster families, prior support groups) </li></ul></ul>
    31. 47. <ul><ul><li>[I learn] more things and deeper things about t </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>their personality. Like at school we wouldn’t tell…really close or too personal about ourselves. But on MySpace they are more comfortable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to share it on there. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Brandy, high school student) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intensifying already close ties </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>F riends, F amily </li></ul></ul>
    32. 48. <ul><ul><li>I get more information [about a person] that I wouldn’t have otherwise…their relationship status; what college they are going to; like what they are going through on a personal level... You get afforded different opportunities from the site like with the [presidential campaign] caucus invitation. I wouldn’t have been able to go there. I wouldn’t have known how to get there otherwise. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Tanya, high school student) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extend connections to people & information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online features smooth paths to offline relationships </li></ul></ul>
    33. 49. <ul><li>Blurs social & education-related task support </li></ul>I was online and I opened up my Word document to type it up and he [saw a friend online in MS] was saying [using IM] how he was doing too and it was really comforting because I knew I was not the only one doing it. And then, he would ask, “What did you write for Chapter 6?” …and we kind of share ideas that way. (Lee, high school student
    34. 50. It’s going to be so hard going out there by myself [to college faraway where she is the only Hmong girl] so I’m gonna need to message people about how I’m feeling…. (Kari, high school senior off to East coast school) Blurs social & education-related support in times of transition
    35. 51. <ul><li>Technological fluencies </li></ul><ul><li>Communication/Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul>People like to be more creative with projects because there’s so much to do on MySpace. You could change so many things…the picture…the outlook of your whole profile. ...Because of that, I think people do try to be more creative and alter things a little to make it more personal to them. (Carl, high school senior, age 18)
    36. 52. <ul><li>People create learning contexts for themselves (offline-online spaces blurred) </li></ul><ul><li>Youth-initiated interest driven communities can span boundaries of formal education/outreach programs, home, & in-between. </li></ul><ul><li>Youth-initiated interest communities can be self-sustaining given adequate time , freedom , and access to material and people resources </li></ul>
    37. 54. Tell Your Child’s Story Create a Personal Online Health Record
    38. 55. <ul><li>http://www.imedix.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Members of the iMedix community share their experiences and rank medical content in order to make health information personal, organized and accessible to everyone. </li></ul>
    39. 57. <ul><li>http://www.patientslikeme.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>To enable people to share information that can improve the lives of patients diagnosed with life-changing diseases…platform for collecting and sharing real world, outcome-based patient data and establishing data-sharing partnerships with doctors, pharmaceutical and medical device companies, research organizations, and non-profits. </li></ul>
    40. 59. <ul><li>Follow f2f with online connection. Network. </li></ul><ul><li>Incentivize learning the online community features to generate interest & critical mass (i.e., play for points) </li></ul><ul><li>Spread timely, high-quality content through multiple communication channels </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for clients to participate, curate, create, share </li></ul><ul><li>Go where young people already are: either exact platform or similar one you build that they evidently enjoy </li></ul>
    41. 60. <ul><li>Know the Terms of Service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Age limitations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No drug talk, nudity, drug-using pictures, hate speech, bullying, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Privacy settings & multiple audiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep it positive, upbeat in semi-public </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tackle serious issues in private/one-one </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Authentic profiles but no contact info </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Showcase talents, skills, best ‘Face’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Respect kids’ space, be a role model </li></ul>
    42. 61. <ul><li>Educator & Researcher at intersection of: </li></ul><ul><li>learning technologies, communication, & new media studies </li></ul><ul><li>www.cgreenhow.org </li></ul><ul><li>Founding Chair of the Social Networks Research Collaborative </li></ul><ul><li>ww.socialnetresearch.org </li></ul><ul><li>Christine Greenhow, Ed.D. </li></ul><ul><li>Visiting Research Fellow, Yale University & U of M </li></ul><ul><li>Email ( [email_address] ) </li></ul><ul><li>Facebook http://www.facebook.com/christine.greenhow </li></ul><ul><li>Twitter http://www.twitter.com/chrisgreenhow </li></ul><ul><li>Social media design projects </li></ul><ul><li>http://apps.facebook.com/hotdish </li></ul><ul><li>http://apps.facebook.com/mndaily </li></ul>
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