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Amherst 8 09

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LitLife Power Point created by Carolyn Greenberg for Amherst Schools Summer Institute 2009

LitLife Power Point created by Carolyn Greenberg for Amherst Schools Summer Institute 2009

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  • Comfort Level on the following: How to physically set up the classroom to support a reading workshop How to conference with children in reading How to plan effective focused instruction (aka mini-lessons) in reading The daily schedule for reading workshop How to manage independent reading The role and place of small group instruction How to organize a classroom library Teaching reading in units of study How to assess children in reading workshop What to teach in a reading worksop
  • Review results, Ask group what elements are really important to them
  • Reflect on what connections you made during this reading
  • Small groups draft--10 minutes
  • Think of something that you are good at. How did you learn? Did someone teach you? Are you self-taught? What was the learning process? What kept you at it?
  • Immersion -- Infant and young children need to be surrounded by an environment that is rich in spoken and written language. Demonstration --Children need opportunities to observe models of the way written language is used in daily life. Engagement --Young children need opportunities to try reading and writing activates on their own. Expectation --Children need to be in an environment where adults believe that they will acquire literacy skills. Use--Children must use reading and writing skills throughout their daily lives. Approximation--Young children should be free to make attempts at written language that move closer and closer to conventional reading and writing. Response--Children need to receive feedback from knowledgeable people on their attempts a reading and writing.
  • During scaffolded instruction, teachers provide students with varying degrees of support that enable them to complete a specific task. As students become more competent, the scaffolding is removed and the students assume responsibility for the task.
  • Consider word walls and high frequency word lists— Red-lining papers is an way that scaffolding never gets removed
  • instruction is differentiated for all students the Complete 4 Model creates balance and integrity in yearlong planning for the teaching of reading and writing content area learning is deeply integrated so that the teaching of reading and writing and the content area work mutually empower each other and stimulate student learning and growth students have access to a variety of genre and levels of literature in their independent reading lives students read and write independently during school hours, with teacher support and supervision there is a balance of both the opportunity to practice safely what students are newly learning, and also to try out skills in high stakes formats (assessments, celebrations) learning is framed inside organized units of study which relate to the real experiences of their reading and writing lives students receive regular opportunities to read and write inside a variety of genres, and for a variety of purposes teachers assess students both formally and informally: assessments which both compare one’s students to the wider student world, and also help to understand students individually, and are utilized in ways which to guide instruction celebration and play are key ingredients in the teaching of reading and writing, and should be incorporated at all grade levels
  • instruction is differentiated for all students the Complete 4 Model creates balance and integrity in yearlong planning for the teaching of reading and writing content area learning is deeply integrated so that the teaching of reading and writing and the content area work mutually empower each other and stimulate student learning and growth students have access to a variety of genre and levels of literature in their independent reading lives students read and write independently during school hours, with teacher support and supervision there is a balance of both the opportunity to practice safely what students are newly learning, and also to try out skills in high stakes formats (assessments, celebrations) learning is framed inside organized units of study which relate to the real experiences of their reading and writing lives students receive regular opportunities to read and write inside a variety of genres, and for a variety of purposes teachers assess students both formally and informally: assessments which both compare one’s students to the wider student world, and also help to understand students individually, and are utilized in ways which to guide instruction celebration and play are key ingredients in the teaching of reading and writing, and should be incorporated at all grade levels
  • Why is it important for children to choose their own books? How could you support self-selection of books in your classroom? How do you manage many children in different books?
  • LitLife’s Beliefs- ways to organize teaching and thinking that makes sense and marks time- anecdote of classroom and staff development experience.
  • Process:
  • Activity- What do you want your readers to be able to do by end of year? Add to complete 4 These traits inform you to the kinds of assessments you want to give Formal- DRA, NJASK, Any other standardized tests administered by district Informal- conferences, rubrics, reflections, performance tasks, commitment stage of units
  • Activity- What do you want your readers to be able to do by end of year? Add to complete 4 These traits inform you to the kinds of assessments you want to give Formal- DRA, NJASK, Any other standardized tests administered by district Informal- conferences, rubrics, reflections, performance tasks, commitment stage of units
  • Activity- What do you want your readers to be able to do by end of year? Add to complete 4 These traits inform you to the kinds of assessments you want to give Formal- DRA, NJASK, Any other standardized tests administered by district Informal- conferences, rubrics, reflections, performance tasks, commitment stage of units
  • Activity- What do you want your readers to be able to do by end of year? Add to complete 4 These traits inform you to the kinds of assessments you want to give Formal- DRA, NJASK, Any other standardized tests administered by district Informal- conferences, rubrics, reflections, performance tasks, commitment stage of units
  • Activity- What do you want your readers to be able to do by end of year? Add to complete 4 These traits inform you to the kinds of assessments you want to give Formal- DRA, NJASK, Any other standardized tests administered by district Informal- conferences, rubrics, reflections, performance tasks, commitment stage of units
  • LitLink Days include topics such as Boys and Reading, Conferring, Book Clubs, Learning to Write, Writing to Learn We have flyer!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Exploring the Reading Workshop Joyful Reading, Thoughtful Teaching Amherst Schools Summer Institute August 2009
    • 2. Introductions and Hopes
    • 3. Goals <ul><li>Rationale and research for teaching reading in a workshop model </li></ul><ul><li>Time Zones: Day, Unit, Year, Continuum </li></ul><ul><li>CASE: Curriculum, Assessment, Structures, Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Develop individual “Try It” lists </li></ul><ul><li>Explore your questions and ideas </li></ul>
    • 4. Group Self-Assessment
    • 5. On the chart paper around the room… <ul><li>Please place a colored dot that indicates your “comfort level” with the reading workshop element listed </li></ul><ul><li>Green: Expert- very familiar, confident </li></ul><ul><li>Yellow: Intermediate- Somewhat familiar, dabbling </li></ul><ul><li>Blue: Novice- unfamiliar, little or no experience yet </li></ul>
    • 6. The Laborers   There once was a traveler who journeyed all over the globe in search of wisdom and enlightenment. In the midst of one village, he came upon a great deal of noise, dust and commotion. He approached the nearest laborer and asked, “Excuse me, I’m not from this village. May I ask what’s going on here? The laborer replied curtly, “Can’t you see? I’m busting rocks.”  
    • 7. <ul><li>The traveler approached a second laborer doing the same thing and asked the same question. The second laborer replied, “Can’t you see? I’m earning a living to support my family.”   The traveler then approached a third laborer who was also breaking up rocks and posed the question a third time. With a broad smile and a gleam in his eye, the third laborer replied with great pride, “Can you see? We’re building a cathedral.”   - Author unknown: adapted from “The Cathedral Within” by Bill Shore </li></ul>
    • 8. What is our mission as teachers of reading?
    • 9.  
    • 10. Cambourne’s Conditions for Literacy Learning (1988) <ul><li>Immersion </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstration </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Expectation </li></ul><ul><li>Use </li></ul><ul><li>Approximation </li></ul><ul><li>Response </li></ul>
    • 11. Situated Cognition (Lave, 1988) <ul><li>most learning occurs naturally through activities, contexts, cultures </li></ul><ul><li>schools too often abstract learning,u n situate it, teach concepts removed from natural contexts and applications </li></ul><ul><li>situated examples include more ap prentice-like situations (e.g., sculptors, printers in studio or workshop) </li></ul>
    • 12. Learning Non-Fiction in an ESL Class: The interaction of situated practice and teacher scaffolding in a genre study by Jason Ranker, The Reading Teacher , April 2009 <ul><li>Research advocates a balance of: </li></ul><ul><li>Overt Instruction which emphasizes the teacher drawing student attention to particular aspects of literacy learning through lessons, conferences, small groups, and other discussions as they work on their own reading and writing </li></ul><ul><li>Situated practice where students are actively and collaboratively engaged in the actual activity being learned </li></ul>
    • 13. Cognitive Apprenticeship (Collins, Brown, Newman, 1989) <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Scaffolding </li></ul><ul><li>Articulation </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Exploration </li></ul>
    • 14. What is Modeling? <ul><li>An expert carries out a task so that student can observe and build a conceptual model of the processes that are required to accomplish the task. For example, a teacher might model the reading process by reading aloud in one voice, while verbalizing her thought processes (summarize what she just read, what she thinks might happen next) in another voice. </li></ul>
    • 15. What is Coaching? <ul><li>The process of overseeing the student's learning. Observing students while they carry out a task and offering hints, feedback, modeling, reminders, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Scaffolding is an essential element of coaching… </li></ul>
    • 16. What is Scaffolding?
    • 17. Scaffolding includes… <ul><li>Recruiting the student’s interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Reducing the number of steps so that the task is manageable. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintaining student’s persistence toward the goal. </li></ul><ul><li>Making critical features evident. </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling frustration and risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Targeting the “Zone of Proximal Development ” (Vygotsky) </li></ul>
    • 18. A Scaffold Needs to be Self-Destructive <ul><li>When the student’s behavior signals to the teacher that he or she can do it by him or herself, the support is removed. </li></ul>
    • 19. What is Articulation? <ul><li>Encouraging students to verbalize or demonstrate knowledge and thinking processes in order to expose and clarify them </li></ul>
    • 20. What is Reflection? <ul><li>Learners are given the opportunity to reflect on the learning experience where they can share what they have learned or how they have grown as a reader </li></ul><ul><li>Enables students to compare their own problem-solving processes with those of an expert or another student. </li></ul>
    • 21. What is Exploration? <ul><li>Students enter a mode of problem solving on their own. They explore concepts and use strategies independently. </li></ul>
    • 22. When teaching reading and writing, we… <ul><li>differentiate instruction </li></ul><ul><li>balance curriculum using the Complete 4 system </li></ul><ul><li>integrate content areas when possible and when effective </li></ul><ul><li>teach in a daily whole/small/whole model that allows for direct instruction and guided practice of teaching points </li></ul>
    • 23. When teaching reading and writing, we… <ul><li>build extended time for students to practice what they are learning </li></ul><ul><li>forge connections between reading and writing whenever possible </li></ul><ul><li>teach with an awareness of the four “time zones”: a continuum, a year, a unit and a day </li></ul>
    • 24. Getting the Big Picture…
    • 25. C.A.S.E. <ul><li>Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Structures </li></ul><ul><li>Environment </li></ul>
    • 26. Physical Environment
    • 27. Is the arrangement of your classroom and the accessibility of books and other resources conducive to instruction that promotes thinking and exploration in reading?
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    • 42. Does a person walk in your classroom and know immediately that this is a community that celebrates literacy?
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    • 55. <ul><li>How do you use wall-space in your classroom? </li></ul><ul><li>What students work is displayed and why? </li></ul><ul><li>Is student thinking about reading showcased? </li></ul><ul><li>Do your charts scaffold independence? </li></ul>
    • 56.  
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    • 63.  
    • 64. ????????? Think, Pair, Share
    • 65. Cultural Environment
    • 66. <ul><li>How do you develop a classroom community of lifelong readers? </li></ul><ul><li>What habits of mind do we wish to cultivate in our readers? </li></ul><ul><li>What conversations need to take place to foster this community? </li></ul><ul><li>How important is student choice, talking opportunities, writing opportunities? </li></ul>
    • 67. ????????? Think, Pair, Share
    • 68. Teaching an ARCH Unit <ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Routines </li></ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Community </li></ul>
    • 69. Assessment
    • 70. Routines
    • 71. Choice
    • 72. Healthy Community
    • 73. Sample ARCH Unit
    • 74. Planning an ARCH unit
    • 75. How to make this more than activities?
    • 76. More depth on anchor charts <ul><li>Location (think content and function) </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose (celebration/showcasing, highlighting concepts, scaffolding independence) </li></ul><ul><li>Composition and color </li></ul><ul><li>Rotating and removing </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom challenges </li></ul>
    • 77. Recommended book titles, resources, book substitutions <ul><li>Complete Year Unit Books </li></ul><ul><li>Contact me with specifics (level, topic, strategy, student books, professional books, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>For substitutions--I.d. the purpose that the book is used for </li></ul><ul><li>Email me, Google, Classroom 2.0, Booksource.com </li></ul>
    • 78. Small Pull-out <ul><li>Look for ways to build key elements into daily instruction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Modeling what good readers do, coaching, independent practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build reading identities and set goals (share with classroom teachers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Response </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Find opportunities to push-in or visit other classes, co-teach relevant lessons </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate with the classroom teachers </li></ul>
    • 79. Some Adaptations for Special Needs <ul><li>Same concepts, lower level books </li></ul><ul><li>Same concepts, more scaffolding </li></ul><ul><li>Make challenging texts accessible so students can engage in the thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-teach concepts that will be addressed in large group later </li></ul><ul><li>Small groups to revisit teaching points </li></ul><ul><li>More opportunities for active engagement </li></ul>
    • 80. More on ESL and SpEd <ul><li>In a co-teaching situation, use partner teaching for beginning and end of unit and parallel teaching for middle of unit (where the most challenge and accountability lies) </li></ul><ul><li>Overt instruction and situated practice </li></ul>
    • 81. How often to assess? <ul><li>Longitudinal assessment (I.e. DRA, QRI)--two to three times per year </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment on unit goals, a few times per unit depending on length of unit </li></ul><ul><li>Running records--early grades: every few guided reading sessions </li></ul><ul><li>Level check--once or twice per marking period for fluent readers </li></ul>
    • 82. How to address standards and maps that identify resources? <ul><li>Match units to standards </li></ul><ul><li>Apply the daily workshop structure and apprenticeship model to required curriculum goals </li></ul><ul><li>Use required resources as whole group read-alouds </li></ul>
    • 83. Gradual Release of Responsibility
    • 84. Gradual Release of Responsibility-Daily Structures <ul><li>Guided Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Book Clubs </li></ul><ul><li>Read-aloud </li></ul><ul><li>Independent Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Shared Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Conferencing </li></ul>
    • 85. Gradual Release of Responsibility* <ul><li>Read-aloud </li></ul><ul><li>Shared Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Guided Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Conferencing </li></ul><ul><li>Book Clubs </li></ul><ul><li>Independent Reading </li></ul>
    • 86. Time-Zones for Teaching A Continuum A Year A Unit A Day
    • 87. The Components of Comprehensive Daily Literacy Instruction <ul><li>Teach  WHOLE </li></ul><ul><li>Practice  SMALL </li></ul><ul><li>Share  WHOLE </li></ul>
    • 88. The Day <ul><li>WHOLE - Focused Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>SMALL - Independent Practice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Small Guided Groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conferring </li></ul></ul><ul><li>WHOLE - Wrap Up </li></ul>
    • 89. The Whole <ul><li>Students gather for a period of focused instruction for 5 – 15 minutes. </li></ul>
    • 90. The Small <ul><li>Students practice independently, while teacher confers with students and/or conducts small instructional groups. </li></ul>
    • 91. The Whole <ul><li>Wrap Up - Students return for a focused </li></ul><ul><li>5 - 7 minute discussion that reflects on the day’s learning. </li></ul>
    • 92. The Whole: Stages of Focused Instruction Handouts and video with Ms. Damiano, Hackensack Schools
    • 93. Stages of Focused Instruction <ul><li>Warm-up </li></ul><ul><li>Teach </li></ul><ul><li>Try </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify </li></ul>
    • 94. Using teaching points to promote independence
    • 95. The Small <ul><li>What small group structures support learning in the reading workshop? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Independent reading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conferring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guided Reading (F and P) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategy Groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborations--pairs, clubs, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    • 96. Guided Reading and Strategy Groups
    • 97. Conferring in the Workshop
    • 98. Wise Conferring
    • 99. Conferring Topics
    • 100. Conferring Structure
    • 101. Video examples
    • 102. Recordkeeping Options
    • 103. The Whole: Don’t forget to share!
    • 104. Parallel Structures
    • 105. Apprenticeship Matching Game <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Scaffolding </li></ul><ul><li>Articulation </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Exploration </li></ul><ul><li>Focused Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Independent Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Conferring </li></ul><ul><li>Guided Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy Groups </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborations </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing </li></ul>
    • 106. Teaching in Units of Study Look at sample unit and unit stages
    • 107. The Complete 4 <ul><li>Given all that we have explored in these two days, list goals you have for your readers this year </li></ul>
    • 108. A Comprehensive Curriculum <ul><li>Our students need to understand the process of reading and writing </li></ul><ul><li>Our students should learn to read and write in many different genre </li></ul><ul><li>Our students should be strategic readers and writers </li></ul><ul><li>Our students should demonstrate command of the conventions of the English language </li></ul>
    • 109.  
    • 110. Qualities of an Effective Reader Strong, effective readers have knowledge and understanding of:
    • 111. Qualities of an Effective Reader Strong, effective readers have knowledge and understanding of: <ul><li>The Reading Process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>understanding self as a reader </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>choosing books to match purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>having stamina and reading with fluency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>talking about and growing ideas with others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>using tools in a way that deepens thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    • 112. Qualities of an Effective Reader Strong, effective readers have knowledge and understanding of: <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>A Variety of Genres </li></ul><ul><ul><li>anticipating consistent structures within a particular genre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>approaching a text with a mindset that corresponds to specific genre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>matching genre to purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    • 113. Qualities of an Effective Reader Strong, effective readers have knowledge and understanding of: <ul><li>Reading Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>becoming metacognitive about one’s own reading </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>applying reading comprehension strategies to deepen understanding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>using word attack strategies effectively </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
    • 114. Qualities of an Effective Reader Strong, effective readers have knowledge and understanding of: <ul><li>Standard English Conventions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>developing awareness of grammatical structures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>using punctuation to read smoothly and effectively </li></ul></ul>As teachers of reading we assess for these qualities of reading across the year, in a unit, and in a day.
    • 115. The Complete 4 The Complete 4 
    • 116. To Contact Me… <ul><li>Carolyn Greenberg </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
    • 117. COPYRIGHT NOTICE The material in this PowerPoint presentation is the property of LitLife, Inc. (“LitLife”). The contents of this PowerPoint presentation may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission in writing from LitLife. Requests for permission to reproduce content should be directed to [email_address] . LitLife invests an enormous amount of time and money into developing its Ideas. Those ideas are incorporated into this PowerPoint. Please respect our copyright. © LITLIFE, INC. 2009 Yonkers, NY [email_address] .com www.litlifeinfo.com

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