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CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College
 

CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College

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TAACCCT grantee - overview of CC BY license requirement, Creative Commons and OER.

TAACCCT grantee - overview of CC BY license requirement, Creative Commons and OER.

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  • Welcome DOL grantees! This webinar is specifically tailored to your needs as grantees so you can meet the CC BY license requirement of your TAACCCT grant. Agenda Cable starts with the basic overview of CC, OER and the CC BY licensing requirement. Jane walks through the details of 1) marking grantee work with CC BY and 2) attributing others' CC licensed works (i.e., existing OER).
  • Today we will answer 3 major questions: 1) What is the CC BY requirement in the TAACCCT grant? 2) What is Creative Commons and CC BY? and 3) How should grantees properly mark their work with CC BY? We will also be going over may frequently asked questions culled from grantees throughout the webinar, with a chance for even more Q&A at the end.
  • On to the first question – what is the CC BY requirement in the TAACCCT grant?
  • In order to ensure that the Federal investment of these funds has as broad an impact as possible and to encourage innovation in the development of new learning materials…. Search the SGA text for “Creative Commons” – there are multiple references. It is good to familiarize yourself and your team with this requirement.
  • One question we have received repeatedly from grantees is – What materials do I have to apply the CC BY license to? What if I am buying commercial content with my grant funds? Do I still have to license it with CC BY? The CC BY license requirement only applies to work that is developed by the grantee with grant funds, as noted in the U.S. DOL’s Copyright Materials Clarification:
  • 5. Intellectual Property Rights In order to ensure that the Federal investment of these funds has as broad an impact as possible and to encourage innovation in the development of new learning materials, as a condition of the receipt of a TAACCCT grant, the grantee will be required to license to the public (not including the Federal Government) all work created with the support of the grant (Work) under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CCBY) license. Work that must be licensed under the CCBY includes both new content created with the grant funds and modifications made to pre-existing, grantee-owned content using grant funds.
  • Now I know what you’re thinking, what if you have a mix of your own content plus proprietary licensed materials? Answer: Any material created with DOL funds must be made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license. If the course incorporates third-party proprietary material, those materials should be marked as not subject to the terms of the CC BY license. In addition, simply removing that material prior to sharing the course publicly, and acknowledging what was removed, is sufficient.
  • So that’s the CC BY license requirement in a nutshell. Before we move on to answering the next big question, does anyone have anything they’d like to address about the actual requirement? … Ok, so, the next big question is, “What is Creative Commons? What is CC BY?” “Clap” if you’ve heard of Creative Commons or CC BY before.
  • Creative Commons, if you don ’t already know, is an actual organization. We’re a nonprofit, and we have a website at creativecommons.org.
  • We’ve been around for a long time. In fact, we turned 10 last year . Well, our tools, including the CC BY license you’ve been hearing so much about, turned 10. The organization itself started in 2001.
  • In education, and many other domains (such as research, science, music, art), many people already participate in and depend heavily on a sharing culture. Academics rely on sharing papers to improve their research, educators rely on sharing and adapting course materials for the classroom, and librarians are constantly thinking of ways to best share books, journals, and other resources with the public.
  • In the process of sharing, people run into all sorts of barriers, especially at the institutional level…
  • … thanks to copyright law, which can be confusing, overly restrictive, and time-consuming, especially when you want to clear the permissions to use a resource that is developed by another person or institution. Usually, you have to get your lawyers talking to their lawyers to work out a different agreement every single time.
  • That ’s where Creative Commons comes in. Creative Commons makes sharing easy, legal, and scalable.
  • With Creative Commons, you don’t have to work out a complicated legal solution each and every time. That’s because, with Creative Commons, creators can grant copy and reuse permissions in advance. And these permissions apply for the future as well, so there’s no uncertainty about the availability of what you share 5, 10, 20 years down the line.
  • So how is that possible? How is CC less complicated than the existing system? Very simply, we offer free copyright licenses that creators can attach to their works. And one of those licenses is the license in your grant requirement, the CC BY license.
  • Here it is! Creative Commons Attribution, also known as CC BY.
  • With the CC BY license, you retain your copyright, while granting some uses of your work.
  • Namely, you grant the public the rights to copy, distribute, perform, display, and build upon your work, as long as they give you credit for your work.
  • Credit is also known as attribution, and all CC licenses require attribution.
  • Here is an example of an educational textbook that is publicly available under the CC BY license. If you click on the CC BY icon or the linked text, it will take you to..
  • This license deed. This is a human readable summary of the rights the creator (also known as the licensor) has given to the public, and the conditions that the user of the work (also known as the licensee) must abide by in order to use the work. You can see that the deed clearly states that you are free to share and remix the work as long as you provide attribution.
  • Of course, Creative Commons offers more than one CC license -- there are six! But the only one you have to worry about for the purposes of the TAACCCT grant is the CC BY license. The other licenses grant varying levels of permissions. All of the licenses are simple to understand and are the standard licenses used in the US and around the world to grant copyright permissions to your work.
  • The CC BY license is especially designed for the Internet age. I showed you the human-readable summary of the license in the last slide, but what about the license itself?
  • * So this is the actual license, the document that lawyers have drafted and vetted so that the license works like it’s supposed to according to US and international copyright laws. This is the first way the license is expressed, written by and for lawyers. * This is what makes CC BY enforceable in a court of law.
  • * But since most of us are not lawyers, we also make the licenses available in a format that normal people can read and understand. * We call this the “human readable” summary of the license, which sums up the most important terms and conditions of the license into non-technical language. * One way to think of it is as the user-friendly interface to the actual license.
  • * The third and final layer of the license design is the machine-readable metadata. This is what really makes the CC license viable for the Internet age. This small snippet of HTML code summarizes the CC license and associated metadata (such as who the work is authored by) into a format that software, search engines, and other kinds of technology can understand. * Btw, You don’t have to worry about coming up with this code by yourself, because we have a tool that spits it out for you. All you have to do is copy and paste into your webpage – Jane will go over that later.
  • And once you have pasted the code into your webpage, others can discover your work through search services with CC license filters, such as Google advanced search and many other platforms. You can check out how it works by going to search dot creativecommons dot org.
  • Today, you can search through more than 500 million works on the web under CC licenses. The number continues to grow!
  • And these works are not limited to the U.S., but originate from all around the world. It doesn ’t matter where the author of the CC licensed work lives, because CC licenses work globally. We’ve worked very hard to make sure of that by working with affiliate teams in 74 jurisdictions around the world.
  • And many of these millions of works are educational resources, also known as open educational resources or OER. OER are possible because of the CC licenses, which provide the legal framework that allows people and institutions to share and build on these the educational resources openly. The OER movement is a movement of organizations and individuals that offer free educational resources under CC licenses to anyone in the world.
  • But I’m sure at this point a lot of you may be thinking, what are open educational resources?
  • The Hewlett Foundation defines OER as ……. As you can see from this definition, all educational resources carrying a CC BY license are considered OER. As we went over before, CC BY enables “ free use and re-purposing by others. ” Not all open licenses – not even all of the CC licenses! – enable this.
  • So by fulfilling the CC BY grant requirement, you are joining a global open education movement dedicated to furthering universal access to education.
  • All of these initiatives, and more, are using CC licenses to share their educational materials with the world. I’m sure you’ve heard of the more popular ones, such as MIT OpenCourseware, the Khan Academy, and Curriki.
  • This includes Wikipedia, which about 2 years ago merged all their content into using CC attribution share-alike license
  • And Flickr, the popular photo sharing community.
  • And let’s not forget whitehouse.gov. For those of you who don’t know, all third party materials on whitehouse.gov are defaulted under a CC BY license.
  • Well, you can use the CC search tool I showed you on a previous slide, or you can go to open4us.org where we give you a list of places to find OER.
  • Simply go to this web address to access those resources.
  • So that’s Creative Commons and CC BY in a nutshell. Before we move on to the next question involving the actual marking and implementation of the CC BY license for grantee works, does anyone have questions about Creative Commons, the CC BY license, or OER? Ok, so the next (and last major question) we’re going to answer today is “How should grantees properly mark their work with CC BY?”
  • Follow the instructions and arrows. The first box called License Features asks you 2 questions – you can leave everything at the default setting. The default setting for this tool is the CC BY license, which makes your job easy. Yes – to allow modifications. The CC By license allows modifications. Yes – to allow commercial uses. The CC BY license allows commercial uses. Ignore License jurisdiction – the default setting – international – is the one you want. It is the license specified in the SGA. To the right you’ll see that you’ve selected the CC BY license without having to do anything! Then follow the arrow to the bottom, where it says Have a web page? There is the automatic machine-readable code that we mentioned earlier. It’s there for you to copy and paste. On the webpage where you will be hosting your materials, copy and paste the code into the page’s editing interface. If you have no idea how to do this, don’t worry – you’re probably not going to be the one in charge of editing your project’s website. Simply send the person who will be in charge of that to this tool and to me if they have any questions and I will work with them directly to get it on the website.
  • Once you copy and paste the code into your web page, the page will automatically display this CC BY license icon and text. The license statement an icon are automatically linked to the license deed that Cable showed you earlier. It’s that easy for anyone to add the CC license to their website.
  • This notice reflects the specifics to your project and who the work is by.
  • At the end of the textbook they give credit for all the different pieces. You can see that it’s as simple as a title, link to the original content, name of the author, and a link to the CC license of the original content.
  • At the end of the textbook they give credit for all the different pieces. You can see that it’s as simple as a title, link to the original content, name of the author, and a link to the CC license of the original content.
  • Here’s another FAQ we’ve received a lot. Who do we put as the author of our materials, eg. consortium, college, or faculty? The answer: The author of the material is normally the person or group of individuals who created the material. However, your consortium or college may have a policy on who is listed as the author (eg: it could be the consortium, the college, or the individual). Any particular policy is not stipulated by the grant.
  • Which brings us to the next frequently asked question, How do we credit the U.S. DOL as a funder of our materials? The Answer: See the Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables in the Round One SGA (pdf), Section III.G.6, which states that “The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds, including its incorporation in the Licenses:”
  • The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds
  • The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds, including its incorporation in the license: Please note that this disclaimer is separate from the CC BY license notice which you are attaching to your works. The CC BY license is issued by you directly to the public for their reuse of your works, and does not involve the DOL as a third party.
  • Please note that this disclaimer is separate from the CC BY license notice which you are attaching to your works. The CC BY license is issued by you directly to the public for their reuse of your works, and does not involve the DOL as a third party.
  • Now we’re going to go over several frequently asked questions we’ve received from grantees, but before we do that I wanted to pause here to see if anyone had any questions about CC license marking. Questions?
  • The U.S. DOL requires that materials be submitted at the end of the grant. Please consult your DOL federal program officer for details.
  • Grantees are encouraged to share draft and pre-final versions of content, through self-hosting or by depositing them in a publicly-accessible repository. Though no policy mandates sharing of content before final deposit with DOL, sharing content can help avoid duplicate efforts by other grantees and consortia.
  • Another question we’ve received is whether grantees can change the license after the project has ended. The answer: CC licenses are not revocable. Once a work is published under a CC license, licensees may continue using the work according to the license terms for the duration of copyright protection. Notwithstanding, CC licenses do not prohibit licensors from ceasing distribution of their works at any time; however, you might check with the U.S. Department of Labor if the grant allows you to do so.
  • Many grantees have express some concern over getting their faculty and other third party stakeholders on board with the CC BY license requirement. However, The SGA explicitly stated that any materials created through these funds will be made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution license and that was agreed to by the consortium when they accepted the money from the DOL. That is, the you can tell faculty that they have already agreed to openly license materials created with DOL grant funds. When dealing with a faculty or staff member that is hesitant to openly licensing their materials it is best to describe the benefits that will come with the sharing; benefits such as wider recognition of their quality work, a larger audience that will benefit from their work, and an ability to publicly refer to their quality work for others to review. All of these benefits encourage more positive work to happen with the faculty member and will potentially aid in their chances of receiving future funding.
  • Lastly, I can’t possibly remember everything from this webinar. Where can I get some answers in the future when I need them?
  • Our free services are outlined at Open4us.org, along with the OPEN service partners’ services, which you will also be learning about today. We also provide a lot of resources at this website and will be continuously updating it as needs and questions arise throughout the period of your grant. It’s pretty much your one-stop shop for a lot of the support you will need throughout your grant period, and as we’ve mentioned yesterday and today – all our services are free. There is an FAQ section that goes over every question we answered today and more!
  • If that doesn’t help, email us!
  • You’ll be happy to note that this presentation itself is licensed under CC BY, with proper marking and all! (Open for questions).

CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College CC Overview for North Georgia Technical College Presentation Transcript

  • Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) for North George Tech
  • Dr. Cable Green Director of Global Learning Jane Park Project Manager
  • 1. CC BY grant requirement 2. Understanding Creative Commons, CC BY, OER 3. Marking works with CC BY 4. Questions? Overview
  • What is the CC BY requirement in the TAACCCT grant?
  • Open Licensing Requirement for TAACCCT Rounds 1, 2 & 3
  • “as a condition of the receipt of a TAACCCT grant, the grantee will be required to license to the public (not including the Federal Government) all work created with the support of the grant (Work) under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY) license. Work that must be licensed under the CCBY includes both new content created with the grant funds and modifications made to pre-existing, grantee-owned content using grant funds.” SGA, Round 2 (p. 8 / Section I.D.5 )
  • FAQ: What if we are buying commercial content with grant funds? Do we have to license it CC BY?
  • “Only work that is developed by the grantee with the grant funds is required to be licensed under the CC BY license. Pre-existing copyrighted materials licensed to, or purchased by the grantee from third parties, including modifications of such materials, remain subject to the intellectual property rights the grantee receives under the terms of the particular license or purchase. In addition, works created by the grantee without grant funds do not fall under the CC BY license requirement.” Copyrighted materials clarification (p. 9)
  • FAQ: What if we have a mix of our own content plus proprietary licensed materials?
  • What is Creative Commons? What is CC BY?
  • http://creativecommons.org
  • 12 12 10.creativecommons.org
  • Here’s why we exist
  • C “sharing” by ryancr - flickr.com/photos/ryanr/142455033/
  • CC BY-NC-SA / by Judy Baxter: http://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/501511984/
  • CC BY-NC “fuzzy copyright” by PugnoM - http://www.flickr.com/photos/pugno_muliebriter/1384247192/
  • What do we do? We make sharing content easy, legal and scalable.
  • With Creative Commons, creators can grant copy and reuse permissions in advance.
  • How do we do it? Free copyright licenses that creators can attach to their works.
  • A simple, standardized copyright license
  • least freeLeast free
  • CC licenses are unique because they are expressed in three ways.
  • Lawyer Readable Legal Code
  • Human Readable Deed
  • <span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"> <span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">My Photo</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL" property="cc:attributionName" href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creati ve Commons Attribution 3.0 License</a>. <span rel="dc:source" href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/> Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at <a rel="cc:morePermissions" href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZM O</a>.</span> </span> <span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"> <span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">My Photo</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL" property="cc:attributionName" href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creati ve Commons Attribution 3.0 License</a>. <span rel="dc:source" href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/> Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at <a rel="cc:morePermissions" href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZM O</a>.</span> </span> Machine Readable Metadata
  • http://search.creativecommons.or g
  • 200+ affiliates. 74 jurisdictions.
  • Open Educational Resources (OER)Open Educational Resources (OER)
  • FAQ: What is OER?
  • OER: Teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.
  • CCBY“Atlas,it’stimeforyourbath”Woodleywonderworks http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/440672445/in/photostream/
  • Wikipedia: Over 77,000 contributors working on over 22 million articles in 285 languages
  • FAQ: How do we find OER?
  • http://open4us.org/find-oer
  • How do I add the CC BY license to my grant materials? JANE
  • Licensing your work is easy. No registration is required. You simply add a notice that your work is under CC BY. Here’s how you do that 
  • http://creativecommons.org/choose Go to our tool:
  • <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br />This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a>.v This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. _______________________________________________________________
  • You can edit the text for your specific project. Go back to http://creativecommons.org/choose
  • Optional fields
  • <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US"><img alt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0" src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /></a><br /><span xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/dc/terms/" property="dct:title">Welding 101</span> by <a xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" href="https://www.northgatech.edu/" property="cc:attributionName" rel="cc:attributionURL">North Georgia Technical College</a> is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/deed.en_US">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a>. Welding 101 by North Georgia Technical College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. _______________________________________________________________
  • What if I want to add the notice to a document? Go back to http://creativecommons.org/choose
  • Optional fields
  • Paste where you usually put © info
  • Examples 
  • Webpage: creativecommons.org
  • Document: Free to Learn Guide
  • Presentation: This one Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org
  • What about videos? photos? other media? We can help you. We’ll send you examples and assist you directly. Just email taa@creativecommons.org
  • My project is a mix of my own + third party works – CC licensed and proprietary. 1)How do I apply the CC BY license in this case? 2)How do I give credit to the third parties?
  • 1)Change the CC BY license notice to: Except otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.
  • Then, make sure to note those materials that are governed by different terms. You can do this on a separate credits page at the end of the resource. Example 
  • You can also note it right next to the material. Example 
  • That depends. Is the third party material CC licensed or proprietary? If proprietary, give credit how you usually do. (We can’t tell you how to do this.) If it’s CC licensed, here are some tips!
  • When attributing a CC licensed work, use this acronym: ASL Author Source License
  • Example 
  • ASL Author(s) Source (link!) License (make sure it is linked to the right deed!)
  • thor ense urce
  • FAQ: Who do we put as the author of our materials (eg. consortium, college, faculty)?
  • Up to your consortium or college’s policy. Grant doesn’t stipulate.
  • FAQ: How do we credit the U.S. DOL as a funder of our materials?
  • See Section I.D.6 of the Round 2 SGA: Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables “The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds…”
  • “This product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The product was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.” Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables (p. 9)
  • This is separate from and has nothing to do with the CC BY license notice. You can include it in the same section where you usually add your disclaimers or notices.
  • More FAQs
  • FAQ: When are grant materials required to be publicly available?
  • At the end of the grant. Please consult your DOL federal program officer for details.
  • FAQ: Should our materials be in a final version before being made available?
  • They don’t have to be! We encourage sharing drafts to avoid duplicate efforts by other grantees.
  • FAQ: Can we change the license on the materials after the project has ended?
  • If it was created with grant funds, it must be under the CC BY license. Any future versions created without grant funds can be licensed separately, but must include attribution to the original CC BY licensed version.
  • FAQ: We are meeting resistance from faculty and others around opening materials. What steps can I take?
  • Remind them it is required by the grant! If that doesn’t help, we have talking points we can send you about the benefits of opening up publicly funded materials. Email taa@creativecommons.org.
  • FAQ: I can’t remember all this. Where can I go when I’m actually applying the CC BY license?
  • http://open4us.org
  • TAA@creativecommons.org
  • Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org