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Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
Multicompetence
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Multicompetence

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  • 1. Multicompetence Cook 1992, 2009
  • 2. Multicompetence? the coexistence of more than one language in the human brain the opposite of the idea of separate language systems
  • 3. Multicompetence? the compound state of mind with two grammarsVS. Monocompetence (the state of the mind with only one grammar)
  • 4. Cook 1992MAIN QUESTIONS:1. Is multicompetence a different state of mind from monocompetence?2. Is multicompetence simply adding an L1 competence, albeit defective?
  • 5. Cook 1992IN OTHER WORDS … Are languages known by an individual separate entities in the brain or are they part of a supersystem?
  • 6. Implications of multicompetence a multicompetence perspective allows for languages to be viewed as part of a larger system rather than as separate entities in a learner’s mind.
  • 7. Implications of multicompetence the introduction of the multicompetence concept changed the way in which crosslinguistic influence was viewed: transfer became multidirectional
  • 8. Supersystem? since the first language or languages are in the same mind, they must form a language supersystem at some level other than be completely isolated systems (Cook, 2003
  • 9. Supersystem? reaction to Selinker’s (1972) notion of Interlanguage that distinguishes a system of stages in-between the first and second language. (as per Rothman et. al, 2011)
  • 10. Further claims: languages in the multilingual mind are connected in a larger supersystem whereby changes in one language will automatically have an impact on the other existing languages
  • 11. That is: a language that has been acquired is not viewed as a stable system in which knowledge, once stored, is invulnerable to change
  • 12. Clyne 2003 multicompetence implies that languages are always subject to change and this change is influenced in great part, by sociolinguistic as well as psycholinguistic factors.
  • 13. Language Attrition clear evidence that languages (native or non native) show signs of decline when they are not used.
  • 14. Furthermore since languages are assumed as being in constant change, the idea of ‘end-state’ becomes irrelevant (Rothman et. al, 2011)
  • 15. And … the notion of multicompetence might prove explanatory for researchers of all paradigms, as its core tenets are compatible with virtually any existing theory of acquisition  can account for individual variation and unexpected development patterns (Rothman et. al. 2011)

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