Future Food Systems:Policies and programs to assure food for   the poorest under climate change                         Ca...
Outline1. Food insecurity: the most vulnerable in a   changing risk environment2. Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food in...
1. Food insecurity: the most vulnerable   WFP supported over 100 million people in over 80 countries
Food insecurity: the most vulnerable                                           Most undernourished people –              ...
A changing risk environment Resource scarcity and degradation (land, water, food,  energy, biodiversity) Climate change,...
Disaster and extreme weather trends                                      Droughts                                       Fl...
Price volatility 9 billion people by 2050 50-70% more food needed Decreasing stocks and increasing demand
Intensifying hunger risks
Towards an expanding food security challenge         1 billion hungry people at       People who are or may be or         ...
2. Back to the basics: vulnerable livelihoods’ foodaccess                           Household food                        ...
Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity   and povertyHousehold Food  Availability                                ...
Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity   and poverty (cont.)                      DroughtHousehold Food         ...
Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity   and poverty (cont.)Household Food                                      ...
3. Breaking the cycle: supporting vulnerable HHs    achieve FNS and resilience                                            ...
4. Can CSA work in the context of food insecurity?Yes, as part of a broader approach to food systems and FNS              ...
CSA approaches must be context sensitive...                Context A                                   Context B          ...
CSA can add value when itsupports measures that addressbasic FNS needs:   Asset creation for livelihoods enhancement and ...
WFP’s experience• FNS security, livelihoods and  vulnerability focus• Emergencies, transitions, development• Linking Risk ...
WFP’s experience• Gender focus• Linking farmers to markets:  Purchase for Progress (P4P) and Home-  grown school feeding ...
5. ConclusionIn vulnerable areas “CSA-type” approachesmust be framed as part of broader FNS policyefforts that: Are peopl...
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Scaramella - Future food systems - Hunger for action - 2012-09-04

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‘Scenarios for Policy: Transforming Farming, Landscape and Food Systems for the 21st Century’ was a side event held at the Hunger for Action Conference: 2nd Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change. This session, coordinated by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS) considered future policy options for the major transformative changes needed in farming, landscapes and food systems to make climate-smart agriculture a reality.

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Scaramella - Future food systems - Hunger for action - 2012-09-04

  1. 1. Future Food Systems:Policies and programs to assure food for the poorest under climate change Carlo Scaramella, WFP Climate Change, Environment and DRR Coordinator 2nd Global conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Hanoi, Vietnam – 4 September, 2012
  2. 2. Outline1. Food insecurity: the most vulnerable in a changing risk environment2. Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity and poverty3. Breaking the cycle: supporting vulnerable HHs achieve FNS and resilience4. Can CSA work in the context of food insecurity?5. Conclusions
  3. 3. 1. Food insecurity: the most vulnerable WFP supported over 100 million people in over 80 countries
  4. 4. Food insecurity: the most vulnerable  Most undernourished people – 75% – are farmers and pastoralists One billion  They live in poor, marginal and degraded rural areas hungry  They struggle to make a living on people less than 1 hectare or work on other people’s fields  Often unable to produce more than WFP’s assists 100 million people “the bottom of the bottom billion” 70% of food and nutrition requirements
  5. 5. A changing risk environment Resource scarcity and degradation (land, water, food, energy, biodiversity) Climate change, a hunger risk multiplier Food price volatility Intensifying disasters trends Governance challenges, migration, conflict Equity, poverty, development challenges Inter-dependency and complexity of risk drivers
  6. 6. Disaster and extreme weather trends Droughts Floods Storms
  7. 7. Price volatility 9 billion people by 2050 50-70% more food needed Decreasing stocks and increasing demand
  8. 8. Intensifying hunger risks
  9. 9. Towards an expanding food security challenge 1 billion hungry people at People who are or may be or present become vulnerable to future risks Climate impact Resource scarcity and degradation Food price volatility Disasters Population growth Conflict … ... leading to changing scenarios of food insecurity, ie, massive urbanization, further depletion of resources, new governance challenges, conflict...
  10. 10. 2. Back to the basics: vulnerable livelihoods’ foodaccess Household food access Investments in productive Food aid Gathering Own production Food assets, inputs and barter Hunting (food or cash crop, purchases and technologies livestock, fish farm) Other essential non-food Sales Cash income expenditures (clothes, health, education) Non-agricultural Cash Debts Trading Employment production receipts incurred
  11. 11. Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity and povertyHousehold Food Availability Livelihoods and food needs met Seasonal/transitional food No shortages in a shortages good year, but little margin
  12. 12. Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity and poverty (cont.) DroughtHousehold Food Livelihoods and food needs met Availability Major drought/shock has immediate and long term impacts on household livelihoods
  13. 13. Vulnerable livelihoods’ cycle of food insecurity and poverty (cont.)Household Food Livelihoods and food needs met Availability Reducing quality or quantity of meals Sale or loss of Children drop assets and out of school negative coping Exacerbated land degradation
  14. 14. 3. Breaking the cycle: supporting vulnerable HHs achieve FNS and resilience DroughtHousehold Food Livelihoods and food needs met Availability  ensuring sufficient food availability through own production and functioning markets  supporting local and national resilience building strategies helping vulnerable people enhance their food and nutrition security  protecting people from seasonal shortages and disasters ensuring access to nutritious food
  15. 15. 4. Can CSA work in the context of food insecurity?Yes, as part of a broader approach to food systems and FNS social services empower safety -ment nets Food security CSA & resilience insurance risk market management access …
  16. 16. CSA approaches must be context sensitive... Context A Context B Most vulnerable and food insecure areas Productivity Adaptation Mitigation Productivity Productivity Adaptation Adaptation Mitigation Mitigation
  17. 17. CSA can add value when itsupports measures that addressbasic FNS needs: Asset creation for livelihoods enhancement and resilience Affordable technologies, including ecosystem/landscape management/NRM, agro- forestry DRM enhancement, including innovative risk transfer Productive safety nets (for protection and incentives) Enhanced access to land and markets Strengthen local food systems and economies
  18. 18. WFP’s experience• FNS security, livelihoods and vulnerability focus• Emergencies, transitions, development• Linking Risk Management, resilience and adaptation (assets, resources and capacities)• Productive safety nets• NRM, land rehabilitation and reclamation (e.g. Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Somalia, Uganda, Niger…)
  19. 19. WFP’s experience• Gender focus• Linking farmers to markets: Purchase for Progress (P4P) and Home- grown school feeding Innovative risk transfer and insurance:  HARITA/ R4: “weather-insurance-for-work”  LEAP: “climate-proofing” Ethiopia’s PSNP
  20. 20. 5. ConclusionIn vulnerable areas “CSA-type” approachesmust be framed as part of broader FNS policyefforts that: Are people centered, community based and supporting local resilience strategies Address drivers of vulnerability, risk and food and nutrition insecurity Empower communities and provide opportunities for the most vulnerable and at risk Improve governance and enable action locally and at scale Foster sustainable development
  21. 21. Thank you.
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