Learning Event No 9, Session 2, From Agriculture and Rural Development Day (ARDD) 2011
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Learning Event No 9, Session 2, From Agriculture and Rural Development Day (ARDD) 2011

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How can rainwater management help support food production and smallholder farmers’ ability to adapt to climate variability and change? Presentation from the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food ...

How can rainwater management help support food production and smallholder farmers’ ability to adapt to climate variability and change? Presentation from the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food Security (CPWF) from learning event number 9, session 2, Room G. How can Rainwater management help support smallholder farmers' ability to adapt to climate variability and change

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Learning Event No 9, Session 2, From Agriculture and Rural Development Day (ARDD) 2011 Learning Event No 9, Session 2, From Agriculture and Rural Development Day (ARDD) 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • How  can  rainwater  management  help   support  smallholder  farmers’  ability  to  adapt  to  climate  variability  and  change?    
  • Learning  Event   Objec>ve    •  To  demonstrate  the   value  of  inves>ng  in   rainwater   management  to   strengthen  adap>ve   capacity  of   smallholder  farmers    
  • Rainfed  farming  at  risk    Dependence on igreen and blue limate  variability   from   ncreasing  c water 2000
  • Per  capita  water  storage  in  cubic  meters  in   human-­‐made  reservoirs  by  con>nent…      …but  large  dams  are  not  the  only  op>on,  nor  a  sufficient  op>on,  for  climate  smart  agriculture  
  • Climate  smart:  adapta>on,  mi>ga>on  and  livelihoods   start  with  rain,  manage  for  variety  of  livelihood   strategies  and  landscape  niches     4/02/2011  ILRI  Campus,   Water  and  Agriculture  Share  Fair   ETHIOPIA    
  • Consider  A  Range  of  Agricultural  Water   Management  Op>ons  Fish, Livestock, Crops,Ecosystem Services
  • Rainwater  Management   •  It  is  about  capturing,  storing,   managing  and  increasing   produc>vity  of  water     •  It  can  rehabilitate  landscapes   under  scenarios  of  increasing  or   decreasing  rainfall  and  increased   climate  variability.     •  It  can  be  decentralized,  adaptable,   inexpensive,  relevant  to  large   areas  of  lands  currently  being  used   for  rainfed  agriculture.  
  • Collec.ve  ac.on   Capturing  water     In  landscapes       Managing  landscapes    yield  more  water   Rainwater  Management   Systems     More  Food  /    More  Income  /  Resilient      Ins.tu.ons!    Ins.tu.ons!       Storing  water  Ins.tu.ons!     Improved  WP    
  • Inves.ng  in  Watershed  Management      Upstream-­‐downstream  linkages    (Irriga.on)  
  • Market  Incen.ves:  Rainwater  harves.ng  with  high  value  crops   10  
  • Need  to  think  beyond  crop  produc.on  §  Feed  quality;  reduce  methane   emissions  §  Integrate  livestock  into  wider   development  agenda  (e.g.   irriga>on;  watershed   management);  §  Watering  points  in  closer   distances    (>  35%  milk  yield);  §  Limit  conversion  of  range  to   annual  croplands;  C  sequestra>on  §  Maximize  transpira>on  at  the   expense  of  evapora>on  (feed);  §  Market  Incen>ves  
  • Policy Implications.. •  Investment  priority  towards   landscape  rainwater  management,   water  storage;   •  Strengthening  /  Building  local   ins.tu.ons  (byelaws/  religious   organiza.ons/    WUA);   •  Facilitate  informa.on  flow  /   technologies  using  local  channels;   •  Policy  commitment  to  link   development  with  ecosystem   services  -­‐  Water;       12  
  •         Policy Implications..    •   Policy  geared  towards  climate-­‐sensi.ve  systems      (Agriculture  /  wetlands  /  water  towers)  and   vulnerable  communi.es;      •  Na.onal  government  investments  favoring  small   storage  structures  •  Cross-­‐boundary  hydrological  planning  /   watershed  management;  (drought  and  flood   monitoring  and  informa.on  system;  coping   strategies);     13  
  • Bus  Stops  on  Successful  Examples  •  Objec>ves   –  Present  successful  examples   of  small  scale  Rainwater   management     –  Get  feedback  on  how  these   can  go  to  scale  
  • Successful  Examples  1.  Zai  pits  for  in  situ  water   management:  Mathias  Fosu   (Back  of  Room)  2.  Groundwater  u>liza>on:   Deborah  Bossio  (Outside  lec)  3.  Landscape  water  management:   Enyew  Adgo  (Inside  front)  4.  In-­‐field  rainwater  harves>ng:   Jacobus  Botha  (In  the  corner   outside)  
  • Process  •  2  rounds  of  bus  stops  x  15  minutes  •  Presenters  will  present  for  5-­‐6   minutes  on  the  innova>on,  why   successful  and  its  limita>ons   –  Discussion  :  “How  can  we  bring  the   innova>on  to  scale”     –  Try  to  balance  number  of  people   in  each  bus  stop  •  Acer,  come  back  to  synthesize  key   messages  and  how  RWM  approaches   can  be  beier  integrated  into  regional   and  na>onal  debates    
  • Learn  more  at  •  CPWF  website  Hip://www.waterandfood.org   –  More  on  rainwater  management:     –  hip://waterandfood.org/page/News-­‐and-­‐Events/ news:83    •  IWMI  website:  www.iwmi.org