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Reduced emissions from intensified rice production systems
 

Reduced emissions from intensified rice production systems

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Presentation of Syed Faiz-ul Islam at 2013 workshop of the Climate Food and Farming Network: http://ccafs.cgiar.org/climate-food-and-farming-network

Presentation of Syed Faiz-ul Islam at 2013 workshop of the Climate Food and Farming Network: http://ccafs.cgiar.org/climate-food-and-farming-network

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    Reduced emissions from intensified rice production systems Reduced emissions from intensified rice production systems Presentation Transcript

    • Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate Programme “Agricultural Transformation by Innovation (AgTraIn)” “Reduced emissions from intensified rice production systems Prepared by: Syed Faiz-ul Islam Supervisors: Andreas de Neergaard Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen. & Jan Willem van Groenigen Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University. ”
    • Outline  Background & Justification  Objective & Research Questions  Methodology  Expected Outcomes  List of References
    • Background & Justification • Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important agricultural staples that feed more than half of the world population.  Globally, agriculture accounts for 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic CH4 and N2O emissions respectively (Smith et al., 2007).  within agriculture, intensified rice production system is one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric CH4 and N2O (IPCC 2007).  Emissions are predicted to increase by 35–60% up to the year 2030 as a result of the increasing application of chemical and manure fertilizers (FAO, 2003).  Mitigation of GHGs from agriculture without compromising food and livelihood security of rural poor a major societal and scientific challenge .
    • Background & Justification  CH4 and N2O production and emission depend on timing between fertilization and water management and on the size of the labile N and C pools, which yet to be investigated.  Agronomic productivity has to be linked with GHG emission (Yield-scaled GHG emission).  Efficient utilization of differently treated Farm yard manures can be a potential alternative of chemical fertilizers while their possible alternative GHG emissions need clarification.  Integrated rice farming systems and farmers socio-phychological trait need to be investigated for better adoption and diffusion of climate smart technologies.
    • Objective and Research Questions The objective of the current project is to identify and test management practices which can reduce methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from smallholders intensified rice farming systems per unit of area as well as per unit of yield and analyze the farming dimensions and farmers rationale toward adoption and diffusion of climate smart techniques related to soil nutrients and water management.  1. What is the impact of timely application of mineral and organic fertilisers–relative to water table management on N2O and CH4 emissions from smallholders intensified rice farming systems?  2. What is the yield-scaled nitrous oxide and methane emission (agronomic assessment of GHG) of intensified rice production systems and its difference with traditional area based emissions?  3. How does the quality of organic fertilisers influence methane and nitrous oxide emissions, their best ways of utilization, and what are the possible alternate emissions from these organic materials?  4. What are the livelihood and farming dimensions of integrated rice farming systems along with smallholder famer’s rationale of adoption of various “climate smart” techniques related to fertilisation and water management?
    • Methodology University of Copenhagen, Wageningen University and International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) research and laboratory facility will be used for fieldwork and laboratory analysis.  Field experiment: Split-plot experiment comprise of water regime (the main plot)and fertilizer application (the sub-plot) treatments (Liu et al., 2010; Liu et al., 2012). CH4 and N2O emission: Static chamber and gas chromatography techniques (Rochette and Eriksen-Hamel , 2008).  Yield-scaled GHG emissions: According to Mosier et al., (2006) and Linquist et al., (2012)  GHG emissions and nutrient turnover analysis of Farm Yard Manure(FYM): Greenhouse Gas Assessment Incubations (Spokas & Reicosky, 2009) and real time analysis of FYM  Farming systems and livelihood impacts: Farming System and Sustainable livelihood Approach with single visit recall data collection, interviews and PRA
    • Expected Outcomes Scientific publications……..  One to two literature review article  One to two paper on emissions as studies in fields  One paper on laboratory experiments  One paper on Integrated rice farming system and livelihood
    • List of References          FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization), 2003. World Agricultural Towards 2015/2030. An FAO Perspective. Rome. IPCC(Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), 2007. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In: Solomon S, Qin D, Manning M, Chen Z, Marquis M, Averyt K B, Tignor M, and Miller H L (Eds.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. Linquist, B., Van Groenigen, K. J., Adviento-Borbe, M. A., Pittelkow, Cameron., Van Kessel, C., 2012. An agronomic assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from major cereal crops. Global Change Biology 18, 194–209. Liu, S., Qin, Y., Zou, J., Liu, Q., 2010. Effects of water regime during rice-growing season on annual direct N2O emission in a paddy rice–winter wheat rotation system in southeast China. Science of the Total Environment 408, 906– 913. Liu, S., Zhang, L., Jiang, J., Chen, N., Yang, X., Xiong, Z., Zou, J., 2012. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice seedling nurseries under flooding and moist irrigation regimes in Southeast China. Science of the Total Environment 426, 166-171. Mosier, A.R., Halvorson, A.D., Reule, C.A., Liu, X.J., 2006. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in irrigated cropping systems in north-eastern Colorado. J. Environ. Qual. 35, 1584. Rochette P., and Eriksen-Hamel N.S., 2008. Chamber Measurements of Soil Nitrous Oxide Flux: Are Absolute Values Reliable. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 72, 331-342. Smith P., Martino D., Cai Z., Gwary D., Janzen H., Kumar P., et al., 2007. Agriculture. In:Metz B, Davidson OR, Bosch PR, Dave R,Meyer LA, editors. Climate Change 2007: Mitigation. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ChangeCambridge: Cambridge University Press p. 497–540. Spokas, A.K., and Reicosky, C.D., 2009. Impacts of sixteen different biochars on soil greenhouse gas production. Annals of Environmental Science 3, 179-193.