1
Led by
Partner logo
Climate-smart agriculture:
options for practices and systems
Sonja Vermeulen
Head of Research
CGIAR ...
2
Led by
CSA options involve farms,
landscapes, food systems
and services
landscape
crops
livestock
fish
food system
servi...
3
Led by
CSA options for landscapes
landscape
Ensure close links
between practice
and policy (e.g.
land use zoning)
Manage...
4
Led byExample: Sustainable land management in
Ethiopia
Photos: W. Bewket, AAU
 190,000 ha rehabilitated
 98,000 househ...
5
Led by
CSA options for crops & fields
crops
Crop diversification and
“climate-ready” species
and cultivars
Altering crop...
6
Led byExample: Alternate-Wetting-and-Drying
(AWD) in Vietnam
30% water
25-50% emissions
 lower costs for farmers
 same...
7
Led by
CSA options for livestock
livestock
High-quality diets that
increase conversion
efficiency and reduce
emissions
H...
8
Led byExample: Forest land use and cattle
management in Brazil
Photo: N. Palmer, CIAT
45% higher stocking density
no i...
9
Led by
CSA options for fisheries
& aquaculture
fish
Better physical
defences against
sea surges
Quota schemes
matched to...
10
Led by
Photo: Government of China
Example: Integrated mollusc and finfish
aquaculture in China
net carbon sink
(0.04 t...
11
Led by
CSA options for food systems
food system
More creative
and efficient use
of by-products
Less energy-
intensity i...
12
Led byExample: “Love Food Hate Waste”
in United Kingdom
 13 % less household food waste
 consumers saving $4 billion
...
13
Led by
CSA options for services
services
Monitoring &
data for food
security, climate &
ecosystems
Early warning
system...
14
Led byExample: Seasonal weather forecasts in
Senegal
3 million farmers get forecasts
70 community radio stations
bet...
15
Led by
In summary,
climate-smart agriculture options are:
 Often based on proven low-cost practices
 Achievable at la...
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Sonja Vermeulen: Climate-smart options - FAO Online Learning Event May 2014

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Presentation by CCAFS Head of Research, Sonja Vermeulen, about climate-smart agriculture practices and systems. The presentation was held as part of a webinar hosted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), who in May 2014 is organizing a climate-smart agriculture online learning event with two webinars and facilitated online discussions. The event is part of the Climate Change Mitigation in Agriculture Community of Practice.

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Sonja Vermeulen: Climate-smart options - FAO Online Learning Event May 2014

  1. 1. 1 Led by Partner logo Climate-smart agriculture: options for practices and systems Sonja Vermeulen Head of Research CGIAR Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security www.ccafs.cgiar.org Climate-Smart Agriculture Online Learning Event FAO 13–27 May 2014 www.fao.org/climatechange/micca/79527
  2. 2. 2 Led by CSA options involve farms, landscapes, food systems and services landscape crops livestock fish food system services Photo: N. Palmer, CIAT
  3. 3. 3 Led by CSA options for landscapes landscape Ensure close links between practice and policy (e.g. land use zoning) Manage livestock & wildlife over wide areas Increase cover of trees and perennials Restore degraded wetlands, peatlands, grasslands and watersheds Create diversity of land uses Harvest floods & manage groundwater Address coastal salinity & sea surges Protect against large- scale erosion
  4. 4. 4 Led byExample: Sustainable land management in Ethiopia Photos: W. Bewket, AAU  190,000 ha rehabilitated  98,000 households benefit  Cut-and-carry feed for livestock  380,000 m3 waterways  900,000 m3 compost
  5. 5. 5 Led by CSA options for crops & fields crops Crop diversification and “climate-ready” species and cultivars Altering cropping patterns & planting dates Better soil and nutrient management e.g. erosion control and micro-dosing Improved water use efficiency (irrigation systems, water micro- harvesting) Monitoring & managing new trends in pests and diseases Agroforestry, intercropping & on-farm biodiversity
  6. 6. 6 Led byExample: Alternate-Wetting-and-Drying (AWD) in Vietnam 30% water 25-50% emissions  lower costs for farmers  same yields  better food security • Keep flooded for first 15 days and at flowering • Irrigate when water drops to 15 cm below the surface
  7. 7. 7 Led by CSA options for livestock livestock High-quality diets that increase conversion efficiency and reduce emissions Herd management e.g. sale or slaughter at different ages Changing patterns of pastoralism and use of water points Livestock diversification and “climate-ready” species and breeds Improved pasture management Use of human food waste for pigs & chickens
  8. 8. 8 Led byExample: Forest land use and cattle management in Brazil Photo: N. Palmer, CIAT 45% higher stocking density no increase in pasture area better pasture quality 40% reduction in emissions agriculture decoupled from deforestation
  9. 9. 9 Led by CSA options for fisheries & aquaculture fish Better physical defences against sea surges Quota schemes matched to monitoring of fish stocks Greater energy efficiency in harvesting Rehabilitation of mangroves & breeding grounds Less dependence of aquaculture on marine fish feed Reducing losses and wastage
  10. 10. 10 Led by Photo: Government of China Example: Integrated mollusc and finfish aquaculture in China net carbon sink (0.04 tonnes per hectare)  diversified food supply energy use & costs
  11. 11. 11 Led by CSA options for food systems food system More creative and efficient use of by-products Less energy- intensity in fertilizer production Improving resilience of infrastructure for storage & transport (e.g. roads, ports) Changing diets Greater attention to food safety Reducing post- harvest losses & consumer wastage
  12. 12. 12 Led byExample: “Love Food Hate Waste” in United Kingdom  13 % less household food waste  consumers saving $4 billion  national water footprint down 4%  3.6 million tonnes CO2eq less per year
  13. 13. 13 Led by CSA options for services services Monitoring & data for food security, climate & ecosystems Early warning systems & weather forecasts Mobile phone, radio & other extension or information for farmers Research that links farmers & science Weather insurance & micro-finance Financial transfers & other “safety nets” for climate shocks
  14. 14. 14 Led byExample: Seasonal weather forecasts in Senegal 3 million farmers get forecasts 70 community radio stations better food security outcomes
  15. 15. 15 Led by In summary, climate-smart agriculture options are:  Often based on proven low-cost practices  Achievable at large scale  Best if integrated, not applied one by one  Vital for future food supplies  Already in the hands of farmers, businesses and governments Thank you! www.ccafs.cgiar.org Twitter: @cgiarclimate
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